Oct 04, 2022  
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    PHY 4440 - PHYSICS PRACTICUM


    The physics practicum gives students the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills in physics while working with a private or public agency. The practical experience required augments the physics learned in the classroom.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 - 6 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 6 credits. No more than 3 credits can count towards the major.
  
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    PHY 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
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    PSC 2201 - INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN GOVERNMENT


    An introductory course on the major institutions and processes of the U.S. political system. Topics discussed include the principles of governance, separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism, civil rights and liberties, and policymaking.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 2204 - STATE AND LOCAL POLITICS


    Examines the institutions and actors of state and local governments.  Emphasizes the challenges facing subnational governments and the process and implementation of policymaking.  The comparative method is used to explore a variety of approaches to state and local governance.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 2210 - INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS


    Introduces students to the basic concepts, theories, actors, and issues of international relations.  Provides an analytical framework from which to understand contemporary international relations.  Topics discussed include causes of war, cooperation among countries, threats to international security, non-state actors, human rights, globalization, and transnational issues.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 2212 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS


    This course examines several major countries from all regions of the world.  It addresses historical development, economic systems, political institutions and processes of each country from a comparative perspective.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 2245 - TERRORISM


    This course examines terrorism in a global and political context.  It covers varied definitions of terrorism, its sources, methods, and organizational structures.  Specific movements in all regions of the world are included.  Additional attention is given to the US in the post-9/11 world and issues that involve counter-terrorism and democracy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3301 - CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AND PARTICIPATION


    Examines how social, economic, and psychological factors shape political attitudes and behavior.  Covers the study of public opinion, political participation, and voting behavior.  Addresses issues related to building a civic-minded public.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3306 - CAMPAIGNS and ELECTIONS


    This course focuses on the US electoral process and the actors involved in political campaigns, including political parties and interest groups. It critiques the strategies and tactics of political campaigns.  Topics include grassroots organizing, the effect of media, negative campaigns, and campaign finance and electoral reform.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 3 credits of PSC.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3308 - SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH METHODS


    Techniques and procedures for processing social science data. Ability to develop and evaluate research report and to judge how findings may be applied to improve political science practices are the primary goals of the course. Previous training in statistics strongly recommended.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3311 - SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY


    An analysis of philosophical concepts and arguments presupposed in social and political discourse. Topics include: liberty and its limits, human rights, economic and social justice, the nature of political obligation and disobedience. Emphasis is on evaluating philosophical theories from both contemporary and historical sources.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PHL 2201, PHL 2202, PHL 2205 or PHL 2350.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3322 - PHILOSOPHY OF LAW


    An analysis of philosophical concepts and arguments presupposed in legal discourse and reasoning. Topics will include the nature of law and legal decision making, theories of justice, privacy, responsibility and punishment. Emphasis is on examining specific legal cases from both contemporary and historical sources.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PHL 2201, PHL 2202, or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3328 - GLOBALIZATION


    Examines the major theoretical approaches to globalization.  Explores the growth and impact of globalization and how it affects economic, cultural, political, and human development.  Analyzes global issues and the major actors involved in globalization, including states, international organizations, multinational corporations, and nongovernmental organizations.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3340 - INTELLIGENCE STUDIES


    This course focuses on intelligence analysis-what it is, who does it, and who uses it. It includes an examination of the development of the intelligence community, tensions between this community and policy makers, and implications for democratic governance.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    PSC 3350 - HUMAN RIGHTS


    Focuses on the promotion and protection of human rights in the international political system. Examines international networks of activists and their effect on international relations.  Topics include war crimes, humanitarian intervention, environmental policies, and workers’ rights.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3351 - INTERNATIONAL LAW


    This course focuses on the major principles of international jurisprudence. It includes an analysis of the purposes and functions of international organizational (IOs), which play a significant role in bringing order to the international political system. Particular attention will be paid to case law involving the World Court and the International Criminal Court, as well as other international legal institutions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3365 - POLITICS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES


    This course is an introduction to the economic, social, and political changes in those countries sometimes described as “emerging,” “developing,” underdeveloped,” “Third World,” or “Southern.”  Drawing from the nations of Latin America, Africa, and Asia, we examine the role of the state in the struggle for political and economic development.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must complete 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr.

  
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    PSC 3377 - LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS


    Examines the political systems of the Latin American region in terms of historical, political, economic, and social aspects. Special attention to the idea of political development and change.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 3380 - MIDDLE EAST POLITICS


    Examines the political systems of the Middle Eastern region in terms of historical, political, economic, and social aspects. Special attention to the idea of political development and change.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    PSC 3385 - FIELD RESEARCH ABROAD


    This is short-term study abroad option (country may vary) usually offered during a summer session. The course examines the politics and culture of a specific country through local experience and interviews.

     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Variable Credits: 3-6cr.

  
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    PSC 4401 - TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS


    Examines in depth a specific aspect of the American political system, such as interest groups, political parties, the media, political campaigns and elections, or the judicial system.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 4402 - THE US PRESIDENCY


    Examines the roles and powers of the executive branch in the US political system.  Addresses the historical development of the institution and the relationship with other political actors (particularly Congress).  Includes how the changing media and public environment has impacted the presidency and highlights the most recent campaigns.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 4404 - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW


    Studies the U.S. Constitution in a historical context.  Focuses on the federal judiciary, mainly the Supreme Court, as the primary interpreter of the Constitution.  Analyzes major landmark court decisions that have shaped American civil liberties and civil rights.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 4412 - TOPICS IN GLOBAL POLITICS


    Examines a global aspect of politics, such as a regional focus (e.g. the Middle East) or a thematic focus (e.g. developing countries, international war and peace).

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 4415 - U S FOREIGN POLICY


    Examines the content and process of U.S. foreign policy since 1900. Emphasis is on interests, objectives and strategies in key regions as well as domestic forces and constraints.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: HST 4415.
  
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    PSC 4430 - GLOBAL DEMOCRATICIZATION


    Examines the concepts related to democratic theory, early forms of democratic practices, the development of democracy in Europe and the U.S., and the spread of democracy worldwide. Special attention given to why and how countries become - or fail to become - democratic.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take 3 credits of PSC and Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSC 4444 - POLITICAL SCIENCE SEMINAR


    This capstone course centers on a student driven research project that demonstrates discipline-specific skills and knowledge.

    Prerequisites & Notes:  Must have 60 earned credits and PSC major.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    PSC 4449 - PRACTICUM


    Designed to give experience in the work of an agency or organization and an understanding of its position in the community.  The student should become aware of the agency/organization’s philosophy and goals, its formal and informal organization, and its role in the political system.

    Credits: 1 -5 cr.
  
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    PSC 4450 - INTERNSHIP


    Designed to give experience in the work of an agency or organization and an understanding of its position in the community.  The student should become aware of the agency/organization’s philosophy and goals, its formal and informal organization, and its role in the political system.

    Credits: 6 - 15 cr.
  
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    PSC 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
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    PSY 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY


    Designed to familiarize students with the application of scientific psychology to human life. Emphasis is on “normal” behavior and its antecedents. Includes the study of broad categories of human behavior through various psychological models.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 1151 - ORIENTATION TO PSYCHOLOGY


    Intended for students who have recently become or are seriously considering a psychology major. Will focus on assessing initial skill levels, career choices and planning, critical skills and experiences that may be required for entry into the workforce or graduate study; department policies and procedures; and writing style requirements of the American Psychological Association (APA).

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisites: PSY 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 1160 - HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY


    History of psychology from ancient times to modern era.  Explores the interaction of cultural influences, science, religion, and politics in different time periods. Discovers the relationship between yesterday’s thinking to today’s experiences.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    PSY 2201 - PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT


    An introduction to the assessment of human behaviors in clinical-counseling, educational, and organizational settings. Emphasis is placed on teaching students to be informed consumers and critical thinkers regarding the development and use of psychological tests and assessments.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 2206 - RESEARCH METHODS I


    A practical, skills-based introduction to research methods in psychology including the scientific method, experimental design, survey construction, data collection, and data analysis. Students will be exposed to a variety of computer programs including Excel, SPSS, and Survey Pro as well as information technology resources including PILOT, PsychInfo, EBSCOhost, and Web search engines.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101 or PSY 1151.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 2210 - PSYCHOLOGY OF FAMILY RELATIONS


    This survey course covers the psychological dynamics of the family as a unit, parent-child interactions, the effect of developmental events on the psychology of the family, divorce, single parent families, etc. Class discussion and videotapes are used to illustrate these concepts.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 2212 - HUMAN SEXUALITY


    Provides a survey of scientific findings and contemporary perspectives in the area of human sexuality.  Covers cultural, psychological, emotional, physiological, and developmental aspects of human sexuality and the information needed to help students make responsible decisions concerning their own sexuality and sexual behavior.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 2421 - DEATH AND DYING


    Provides an overview of the psychological aspects of death and dying in our society. Topics include attitudes toward and preparation for death, the terminally ill patient, funeral rituals and burial, mourning and grief, and suicide and euthanasia. Classroom material is supplemented by the student’s self-exploration and writing on feelings, attitudes, and beliefs about death.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3290 - LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT


    Surveys empirical findings regarding the interactive aspects of human behavioral development from conception through old age. Includes examination of major theories regarding physical, social, emotional, and mental development. Emphasizes normal development as it is experienced at each stage of human life span.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3292 - CHILD PSYCHOLOGY


    Surveys theories and empirical findings regarding the interactive aspects of human behavioral development from conception through pre-adolescence. Examines major findings regarding physical, social, emotional, and mental development. Emphasizes normal development as it is experienced at each stage of the childhood years before adolescence.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3300 - HELPING SKILLS


    Designed to help students develop effective listening and interpersonal skills for conducting counseling. The primary emphasis of this course is on (1) the application of counseling and psychological theory to actual casework and (2) the development of counseling skills through observing and conducting peer counseling sessions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101 and upper division standing.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3301 - THEORIES OF COUNSELING


    Considers the major theories of psychological treatment and behavior change. The major theories covered include: psychodynamic, humanistic, behavior, cognitive, and family systems therapies. Emphasis is placed on student understanding of conceptual bases of dominant counseling models.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101 and upper division standing.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3303 - MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELING


    This course provides an examination of various theories and models of intervention within couples and families, with strong emphasis on systems theory. Course content addresses normal family development and systemic problems. Students will learn to describe, explain, and apply theories to case scenarios, role-plays and other demonstrative exercises.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101 and must have 15 credits

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    PSY 3306 - RESEARCH METHODS II


    Research methods II is a hands-on application of the material introduced in Research Methods I. Students in this course will conceptualize, design and conduct independent research projects. From data collected during this semester students will learn to present their research findings in a organized and coherent manner. Research designs covered in this course will range from survey to true experimental designs. Considerable attention will be paid to the conducting of ethical research.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101 and PSY 2206.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3306L - RESEARCH METHODS LAB


    Research Methods Lab.

    Credits: 1 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: PSY 3306.
  
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    PSY 3307 - COUNSELING YOUTH IN SMALL GROUPS


    This course focuses on developing the knowledge and skills needed for counseling young people in group settings such as schools, community programs, recreation programs, residential care, and mental health facilities.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101 or Professor Permission

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    PSY 3309 - STEREOTYPING AND PREJUDICE


    This course addresses social psychological research examining stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination.  Attention is focused on the development, maintenance, use, and reduction of prejudice and stereotypes.  The impact and psychological consequences of stereotyping and prejudice for their victims also are examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3310 - SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY


    Covers the individual aspects of social behavior. Attention is focused on problems in perception, thinking, and motivation. The following topics are examined: theories of person perception, attitude formation, personality structure, motivational determinants of group membership and social conformity, social roles and leadership.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3311 - INTRODUCTION TO SMALL GROUP PROCESS


    Basic principles of small group process are examined through didactic and experiential approaches. Applications in various settings are examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3312 - DEVIANT BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL PROCESS


    Psychological theories of deviant behavior are studied. Major areas include: sexual deviations, prostitution, juvenile delinquency, suicide, obesity, drug addiction, etc., and the various treatment modalities.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3315 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I


    Introduces the field of Human Resource Management (HRM). Covers strategic management and HRM, the legal context, measurement of job content, recruiting, selection, and human resource development.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. Notes: May be taken before or after PSY 3316.
  
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    PSY 3316 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT II


    Continues coverage of the field of Human Resource Management (HRM). Topics include performance management, terminations, workplace safety and health (OSHA), workplace violence, health information privacy issues, job design, organization development, and international HRM.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. Notes: May be taken before or after PSY 3315.
  
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    PSY 3319 - POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY


    An overview of current research in the area of positive psychology. Specific attention will be paid to areas of human positivity, happiness, resilience and flow. Student readings and reflective work will reinforcement theoretical concepts and personal understanding.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 Earned credits

    Credits: 3cr General Education Requirement: Un
  
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    PSY 3321 - ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY


    An overview of research, theory, and trends in the study of adolescence as a stage in human development from the onset of biological pubescence to the transition to young adulthood. Consideration of the multiple and interacting influences on adolescent development and behavior is a major focus of the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3324 - ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING


    Addresses the study of trends in human development from the transition to early adulthood, through senescence, to death. Examines the social, biological, cognitive, and personality components of the aging process. Emphasizes variations in psychological adaptations to personal changes and role transitions during the adult years.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3325 - ADVANCED LEADERSHIP


    Provides students with an in-depth understanding of leadership issues and examines applications of leadership principles to the college environment as well as other settings in the community. Students will participate in a campus or community setting where they can study and apply these principles.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3326 - CHILD & ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY


    This course will explore the major developmental theories, current research in child and adolescent development, and contexts for development. Particular attention is focused on physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development as well as identity issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    PSY 3332 - PSYCHOLOGY OF STRESS MANAGEMENT


    This course provides a current overview of stress and stress-related dysfunction. Techniques for managing stress are emphasized through demonstration and student participation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3345 - ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY


    This course will provide an overview of how to conduct research in social psychology. Students will design, conduct, analyze, and present social psychology research projects. Topics to be addressed in the course include person perception, attitudes, social cognition, group processes, social influence, aggression, helping behavior, interpersonal attraction and prejudice.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101, PSY 2206 AND PSY 3310

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    PSY 3353 - CAREER PLANNING


    An opportunity for Psychology majors to explore career, graduate school and field placement possibilities in their concentration area prior to selecting an internship or completing capstone experiences in the major. Required for all majors: may be taken in lieu of PSY 1151 for students entering the major with more than 45 semester hours completed. The course meets weekly (7 weeks) in the first half of the semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1151 or 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 1 cr. Notes: It may be taken in the same semester as PSY 3352.
  
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    PSY 3355 - HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY


    This course examines relationships that exist between our behavior, our environment, and health and disease. Specific areas of review include the psychology of physical activity, smoking cessation, weight-control, stress-disease links with cancer and cardiovascular disease, and models of health care seeking behaviors. Laboratory exercises further explore aspects of health and disease affected by social and behavioral conditions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 2206 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
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    PSY 3368 - COGNITION AND MEMORY


    This course offers an in-depth study of human cognition and memory. Topics covered include basic sensation and perception, attention, categorization, thinking, reasoning, problem solving, and decision-making. There also is an emphasis placed on basic and applied aspects of memory.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take PSY 1101 & PSY 2206

    Credits: 4cr
  
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    PSY 3391 - PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS


    Provides an introduction to the history of psychological disorders as well as an overview of the symptoms, causes, and treatments of psychological disorders. Emphasis is placed on the biopsychosocial model of psychological disorders.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 3392 - CHILD PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS


    This course explores neurodevelopmental disorders and psychopathology that can arise in childhood and adolescence. Includes current research in child psychological disorders and focuses on diagnosis, treatment and prevention.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take PSY 1101

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    PSY 3395 - PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM


    PSY 3395 (Psychology Practicum) provides academic credit for training and supervised experiences in selected human service programs, mental health agencies, hospitals, human resources offices, etc. appropriate to student’s interests and curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Notes: At least sophomore standing as a psychology major and approval of the department chairperson.

    Variable Credits: 1-3
  
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    PSY 3500 - SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY


    This course deals with pertinent issues in school psychology, such as ethics, emergent technologies, history and foundations of school psychology, legal issues professional issues and standards, alternative models for delivery of school psychological services, as well as roles and foundations of the school psychologist.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    PSY 3550 - APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS


    Introduces students to current principles of learning and their application to the analysis of human behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the experimental analysis of human behavior and applying the principles to improve quality of life.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101

    Credits: 4cr
  
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    PSY 4406 - INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY


    This course provides an introduction to the field of clinical neuropsychology including the study of the human brain and a variety of neurological disorders. Students explore a variety of different disorders and will be introduced to neuropsychological assessment techniques. This course is particularly useful for pre-med, nursing, biology, and psychology students.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101 or BSC 1104 or permission of instructor and 49 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 4408 - CHILD FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY


    This course offers an intensive study of how children’s cognitive development relates to eyewitness testimony and interviewing in a forensic setting. Topics include development of memory systems, memory for emotional experiences, children’s testimonial competency, and lineup identifications.  Students also will learn about other cognitive processes and how they relate to children’s accuracy for recalling events.  Emphasis will be placed on reading and understanding the empirical literature as it relates to real-world examples.

    Prerequisites & Notes: psy 1101

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    PSY 4415 - LABOR RELATIONS


    Labor relations are part of the organizational landscape in manufacturing, service, government, and professional sports. This course examines the history of unions, the organizing process, roles of both parties in contract negotiation and administration, strikes and conflict resolution, grievances, and arbitration processes.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 4416 - COMPENSATION & BENEFITS


    Introduces participants to current issues and techniques in compensation and benefits. Coverage includes the legal context for compensation, job evaluation and point factor systems, construction of compensation surveys, pay for performance systems, workers’ compensation, Social Security, unemployment insurance, ERISA and retirement plans and issues in executive compensation. The course emphasizes conceptual, social, and practical issues related to the development of an administration of compensation systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 4422 - PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN


    Designed to introduce students to the myriad factors influencing the development of girls and women in a variety of cultures and societies. Areas covered include feminist scholarship and research; gender socialization, women’s biology and health; sexuality, relationships and family; and work, career, and power issues. Students taking the course for graduate credit (PSY 5522) are required to complete an independent research project.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 4430 - PERSONALILTY PSYCHOLOGY


    Considers individual differences in characteristic patterns of thinking, feeling, behaving, and motivation. Theoretical ideologies identify differences among individuals and similarities found in human nature.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 4441 - FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY


    Introduces the role of psychologists in the legal system. Assignments examine and evaluate assumptions made by the legal system about psychological and scientific issues. This approach serves as a framework for considering specific psycho-legal issues. Students study issues pertaining to jury trials, the insanity plea, punishment and sentencing issues, the rights of children, and other important questions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101 and 49 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 4445 - ADVANCED COUNSELING SKILLS AND INTERVENTIONS


    This course provides an advanced understanding of the counseling process including presenting problem identification, assessment, and interventions. Additional emphasis will be placed on crisis assessment interventions, ethical considerations, and case conceptualization. Practical application assignments will enable students to develop advanced counseling skills.

    Prerequisites & Notes:  PSY 3300

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 4490 - SENIOR SEMINAR


    In this course senior psychology majors explore their strengths and weaknesses and review the knowledge and skills they have acquired as a psychology major. Students are directed toward understanding how their skill sets and personal preferences may be successfully applied after completion of the B.S. degree (work or graduate school). Additionally, students submit a portfolio of their work while at Mansfield and complete a research-based seminar paper.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Senior standing or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    PSY 4495 - INTERNSHIP


    Provides practical experience and beginning professional skills to selected students. This is an internship that will focus on applied skills, community service, or research work in settings appropriate to student’s interests and curriculum, including metal health and other human service programs, hospitals, human resource offices, and industrial or governmental agencies. The goal is to relate theoretical learning to practical applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: At least junior standing as a psychology major and approval of department faculty.

    Credits: 6 - 12 cr. Notes: May be taken for 6 through 12 credits.  Letter grades (A-F) will be assigned.
  
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    PSY 4496 - RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP


    Provides students with intensive experiences in empirical research under close supervision. Qualified students become involved in ongoing research projects, working with experienced researchers. Students are encouraged to serve their apprenticeship at other campuses or institutional settings.

    Credits: 1 - 15 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 15 credits.
  
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    PSY 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
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    REC 1200 - INTRODUCTION TO OUTDOOR RECREATION


    An introduction to the broad range of skills and knowledge needed by recreation professionals, especially as related to leadership of outdoor activities.  Topics include:  The inherent value of recreation, trends and growth in the field, the role of the public and private sectors, proper training of new guides, marketing recreational opportunities and case studies. 

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    REC 1310 - ROCK CLIMBING


    Covers the broad range of activities concerned with rock climbing, with an emphasis on climbing skills, technical skills with ropes and hardware, and safety.  Participation in weekend and off-campus sessions is required. 

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    REC 1320 - MOUNTAIN BIKING


    Cover the broad range of activities concerned with mountain biking, with an emphasis on riding skills, maintenance, and safety.  Participation in weekend and off-campus sessions is required. 

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    REC 1330 - RIVER GUIDING


    Cover the broad range of activities concerned with river guiding, with an emphasis on river hydrology and navigation, safety and risk management, technical skills, and trip organization.  Weekend and off-campus sessions required.   Course includes a guided raft trip.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    REC 1340 - KAYAKING


    Cover the broad range of activities concerned with kayaking and canoeing, with an emphasis on skills and safety.  Participation in weekend and off-campus sessions is required.  

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    REC 1380 - TEAM BUILDING / LOW ROPES ELEMENTS


    This course focuses on developing self-confidence, decision making skills, cooperation, trust building, goal setting and teamwork through the use of numerous ropes/challenge course elements. Learning how to lead others through a challenge course is an integral part of the class.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    REC 1390 - HIKING AND BACKPACKING


    Covers the broad range of activities concerned with hiking and backpacking, with an emphasis on basic map reading, needed equipment, safety, trip organization, pioneering skills, and outdoor etiquette. Weekend and off-campus sessions required. Course includes a guided hike.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes:  

     


    Credits: 1 cr.

  
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    REC 1400 - FACILITATING HIGH ROPES ELEMENTS


    This course covers skills and fundamentals required to successfully facilitate a high ropes course, including intangible leadership skills (preparedness, assessing group dynamic, communication, risk management, self-confidence) and tangible hard skills (belaying, knot tying, ability to operate high elements).

    Credits: 1cr.
  
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    REC 1550 - NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY


    Covers nature photography using digital cameras with an emphasis on tools and techniques for beginners.  Topics include: lighting; macro and telephoto photography; photographing landscapes, plants and animals, water, and people. Participation in weekend and off-campus sessions is required. 

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    REC 1560 - OBSERVING ANIMALS


    Covers the various skills, tools, and techniques necessary to successfully guide guests to observe wild animals in their natural setting.  Will focus on animals native to Pennsylvania and to the forested regions of the northeastern United States.  Topics include: using a field guide, habitat associations, animal activity patterns, animal signs and tracks, vocalizations and calling, animal body language, blinds and camouflage.  Participation in weekend and off-campus sessions is required. 

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    REC 1570 - EDIBLE/MEDICINAL PLANTS


    Students will learn the historical/cultural background for the use of edible and medicinal plants, especially those native to Pennsylvania. They will learn to identify and prepare many of the more commonly used species plus receive pointers on conveying this information to the general public.  Although designed for nature tourism guides, this class is appropriate for anyone interested in the topic.  Participation in weekend and off-campus sessions is required. 

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    REC 2909 - WOMEN OUTDOORS


    This course approaches the experience and perception of women outdoors from a variety of disciplines-rhetoric, cultural geography, recreations and leisure studies, history, and literature-all from a feminist perspective. We read essays giving an analytical framework for the books and films by women who hunt, fish, rock climb, mountain bike and surf. We explore issues such as how our cultural views and metaphorical constructs of women and nature affect participation in outdoor recreation, how women involved with recreation are talked to and about as compared to men, and what all this means for women who participate in outdoor recreation and for men who work or play outdoors with women.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Minimum 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: WS 2909
  
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    REC 3020 - PRACTICUM


    An out-of-class learning experience that allows students to observe or participate in applied work.   Practicums are graded S or U - they do not affect GPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 - 5 cr. Notes: May be repeated for a total of five credits.
  
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    REC 3100 - LEADING OUTDOOR RECREATION TRIPS


    Course covers the elements required for successful outdoor trips: trip organization, group dynamics, safety and risk management, interpretation of the cultural and natural environment, and outdoor ethics.

    Prerequisites & Notes: REC 1200.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    REC 3200 - WOMEN OUTDOORS


    This course approaches the experience and perception of women outdoors from a variety of disciplines-rhetoric, cultural geography, recreations and leisure studies, history, and literature-all from a feminist perspective. We read essays giving an analytical framework for the books and films by women who hunt, fish, rock climb, hike, backpack, mountain bike and surf. We explore issues such as how our cultural views and metaphorical constructs of women and nature affect participation in outdoor recreation, how women involved with outdoor recreation are talked to and about as compared to men, and what all this means for women who participate in outdoor recreation and for men who work or play outdoors with women.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    REC 3700 - RECREATION MANAGEMENT IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTORS


    Covers management of outdoor recreation organizations in both the private and public sector.  Marketing, budgets and finances, risk management, trip organization and logistics, and community relations are among the major topics covered. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: REC 1200.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    REC 4496 - INTERNSHIP


    Offers practical work experience and the opportunity to apply and to further develop appropriate skills.  All internships will be grades S or U - they do not affect your QPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 6 - 12 cr.
  
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    RPL 2815 - PLANNING AND POPULATION


    Examination of regional and urban planning models, and demographics analysis. Topics include population growth, sustainable planning, land use, zoning, transportation, planning for demographic change (“graying” of the United States), impacts of urban sprawl, urban revitalization and New Urbanism. Field trips may be required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Minimum 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    RTH 1101 - FUNDAMENTALS OF RESPIRATORY CARE I


    A study of the function of the cardiopulmonary systems to prepare the student for further study in respiratory pathophysiology. Relevant clinical applications are included.

    Prerequisites & Notes: BSC 1121, BSC 1122, MA 1128 each with a grade of at least “C” and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    RTH 1102 - FUNDAMENTALS OF RESPIRATORY CARE II


    Classroom instruction and laboratory practice of fundamental respiratory care assessment and therapeutic procedures.  Topics include physical examination of the patient, bedside pulmonary function tests medical gas therapy, aerosol therapy, airway pharmacology, lung expansion therapy, airway clearance therapy, airway management, and infection control.

    Prerequisites & Notes: BSC 1121, BSC 1122, MA 1128 each with a grade of at least “C” and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5.

     

    Credits: 4 cr.

  
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    RTH 1111 - PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTING


    This course covers lung function in health and disease. Techniques used to measure lung function are discussed and demonstrated. The student is instructed in the interpretation of pulmonary function tests.

    Prerequisites & Notes: RTH-1101 & RTH-1102 with a grade of at least “C” in each.

    Credits: 2 cr.
 

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