Oct 04, 2022  
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    SPA 3320 - ADVANCED SPANISH STRUCTURE


    Study and application of Spanish structural patterns; emphasizes syntax.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPA 3351 - TOPICS IN THE LITERATURE OF SPAIN


    SPA 3351 is a Peninsular Literature course designed to enhance and refine the introductory literary skills gained in SPA 3310. As a topics course it will vary each semester in thematic focus. Nevertheless, one can expect to study in detail a particular era, writer, genre, or Peninsular literary phenomena. Some examples might include: The Medieval Text, Golden Age Theater, Cervantes, Becquer, The Realist versus Surrealist Text, The Works of Garcia Lorca, Literature of Exile, Feminist Voices in Spanish Literature, New Theater, or Avant-garde Movements.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 3310 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPA 3360 - TOPICS IN THE LITERATURE OF LATIN AMERICA


    SPA 3360 is a Latin American Literature course designed to enhance and refine the introductory literary skills gained in SPA 3310. As a topics course it will vary each semester in thematic focus. Nevertheless, one can expect to study in detail a particular area, writer, genre, or Latin American literary phenomena. Some examples might include: Latin American Parody, Journalism and Art Criticism in Latin America, the Avant-garde, Latin American Children’s Literature, Feminist Voices in Latin American Literature, or Experimental Urban Theater.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 3310 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPA 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
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    SPE 1001 - FOUNDATIONS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION


    Examines the nature and need of persons who are exceptional in emotional, social, physical, and intellectual development.  Discussions will include key historical foundations, major legislation, laws and policies, identification procedures, placement options, current issues and trends in Special Education.  Observations in Special Education settings are required. 

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Professional Elective
  
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    SPE 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION


    Examines the nature and need of persons who are exceptional in emotional, social, physical, and intellectual development, including the gifted and talented. Discussions will include career opportunities, social issues, current trends in Special Education, rehabilitation and related settings. Observation in Special Education settings will be available.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Professional Elective
  
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    SPE 2270 - EARLY CHILDHOOD DISABILITIES


    Examines the nature, needs and education of young children with disabilities in infant-toddler, preschool, and primary programs. Emphasis will be on identification, multi-disciplinary educational planning, parent counseling, agencies, and services. Coverage will include special classes, resource rooms and mainstream education including curriculum methods and materials plus the roles of other professionals. Observations and child studies are required.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    SPE 2276 - INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS


    This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers with the skills to provide linguistically and culturally appropriate instruction, assessment, and learning opportunities for students identified as English Language Learners (ELL).  We will examine current trends and issues in Second Language Acquisition (SLA), theoretical notions and research in the study of language acquisition, enculturation, acculturation, and cognitive development. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 2290 - CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY


    Designed to introduce multicultural and global education as a concept. Students will examine personal awareness and attitudes, cultural knowledge, instructional strategies, and curricular resources impacting PreK-12. Consideration will be given to the instructional needs of English Language Learners (ELL) and effective teaching/learning theories, approaches, research results, and public policies that pertain to diverse learners.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    SPE 2300 - INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING and DESIGN


    Teacher education candidates will examine the components of curriculum development, content and adjustments.  Students will develop knowledge and skills in goal development, instructional delivery options, and instructional planning for students in a variety of service delivery options.  In addition, student will review the purposes of assessment in the curriculum development and modification process.  Students will be required to interview a special education teacher and a special education administrator. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 2350 - SUPPORTING STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN INCLUSIVE SETTINGS


    This course will introduce the learning and behavioral characteristics of students who have been diagnosed with high or low-incidence disabilities. This will examine the etiology of different disabilities and how they can be supported in the general education setting. An overview of instructional strategies, learning styles, and organizations that serve both of these populations.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    SPE 3270 - MENTALLY AND PHYSICALLY DISABLED


    Introduction to etiology, characteristics, education, management, and laws pertaining to children and adults with mental and physical disabilities.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1101 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3275 - INCLUSION OF DIVERSE LEARNERS


    This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to teach in schools which are becoming diverse. Issues, which include gender, social class, race, ethnicity, disabilities and religion, will be discussed. The teacher candidate will develop skills in teaching pedagogy, assessment curriculum development and teacher student relationships.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3280 - CHILDREN IN NEED OF EMOTIONAL SUPPORT


    Examines the etiology of emotional disturbance with concentration on the characteristics, diagnostic procedures, therapy, educational strategies, instructional materials, and relevant research in relation to the education of emotional/behavioral disturbance. Includes observation and child study experience.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3290 - LEARNING DISABILITIES


    Introduction to the definition, identification, etiology, and epidemiology of learning disabilities with a particular emphasis on methods of differential diagnosis and educational procedure. Remediation strategies, classroom management, and research will be studied.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3291 - HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES


    The focus of this course will be on the specific disabilities that are considered to be high incidence in the field of special education. In relation to these disabilities, particular attention will be given to the causation, inclusion (including legislation and documentation), instruction (both in general and special education) with needed modifications, and evaluation of progress related to the IEP. Highlights will include development of adaptations and accommodations, literacy skills development, and cognitive skills development. A field component is a required part of this course

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 2350.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3300 - CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT & ADJUSTMENT


    Examines curriculum development, adjustments, methods, and materials in Special Education. Studies IEP goals, school organization, grouping, planning unit instruction, teaching-learning process, evaluating pupil progress, and parent and other agency relationships.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 3270 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3315 - COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AND ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGIES


    Designed to provide an overview of communication needs for individuals with disabilities. Language development, assistive technology and alternative communication systems will be explored. The scope of this course is intended to enable students to become familiar with assessment and intervention strategies for students with communication disorders.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3346 - LITERACY INSTRUCTION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES


    Designed to address the needs of pre-service teachers who have the responsibility for literacy development and instruction for students with disabilities. Emphasis will be given to literacy components, evidence-based practices, and varying challenges students with disabilities have in learning to read and write.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    SPE 3351 - BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION


     

    This course content will rely heavily on evidence-based practices from the field of applied behavior analysis. The strategies for addressing behavior concerns in the classroom will emphasize research documented positive behavioral supports, including antecedent control techniques and discrimination training. A tiered intervention approach will be presented to respond to the intensity of the behavioral concern.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 2290 or SPE 2350.

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    SPE 3352 - ASSESSMENT and EVIDENCE-BASED BEHAVIOR SUPPORT FOR INCLUSION


    This course is intended to expose students to three knowledge areas in order to facilitate inclusion: requirements in assessing the educational needs of children who may require special education services, awareness of social/emotional development and the skills required to establish a positive behavioral support classroom environment.  Both process (informal assessment) and product (formal assessment) will be considered.  For positive behavior support; functional assessment/functional analysis, antecedent control techniques and reinforcement will be emphasized. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3361 - AUTISM AND BEHAVIOR DISORDERS


    Students will review evidence-based practices for the intervention with students who have behavior disorders and/or are diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The class will review procedures and processes for the general education classroom as well as focus on individual interventions for students who demonstrate more disruptive behavior. This class will focus on interventions for students who have already been identified as in need of special education services. A field component will be arranged.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take 3 credits from subject SPE.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    SPE 3370 - EARLY CHILDHOOD DISABILITIES


    Examines the nature, needs, and education of young children with disabilities in infant-toddler, preschool, and primary programs. Emphasis will be on identification, multi-disciplinary educational planning, parent counseling, agencies, and services. Coverage will include special classes, resource rooms, and mainstream education including curriculum, methods, and materials plus the roles of other professionals. Observations and child studies are required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3380 - ASSESSMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION


    This course will examine the requirements for the assessment of students with special needs who may require special education services. This will review information related to standardized testing requirements as well as the types of scores used to make eligibility determinations for eligibility. Students will be exposed to the assessment-instruction cycle. This will include practice in utilizing and interpreting assessments.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 2290 or SPE 2350.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3390 - METHODS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MILD DISABILITIES


    Provides organizational procedures, curriculum practices, methods and techniques used in educating mildly handicapped students K-12 in need of academic learning support. Emphasis is on direct teaching, collaborative practices, transitional planning, and curriculum adaptation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1101 and SPE 3300.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 3400 - BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL: SCHOOL EXPERIENCES IN BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL


    A pre-student teaching intensive field experience course.  Students will demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions in pr-k-4th grade education.  Field experiences will be marked by attentions to candidate reflection, continuous learning, research-validated and ethical practices, advocacy for children knowledge and understanding of diversity, collaboration with others, adapting instruction to individual student learning differences, and commitment to professional standards and growth. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE-2800 and 60 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ELE-3400
  
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    SPE 3552 - ADVANCED EVIDENCE - BASED BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT


    This course content will rely heavily on evidence-based practices from the field of applied behavior analysis.  The strategies for addressing behavior concerns in the classroom will emphasize research-documented positive behavioral supports, including antecedent control techniques and discrimination training.  A tiered intervention approach will be presented to respond to the intensity of the behavioral concern.  Field application of the behavior principles will be arranged. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 4400 - STUDENT TEACHING


    (By arrangement). Opportunity to apply knowledge and skills acquired in professional preparation. Accomplished by a field experience under the supervision of master teachers in two different special classes in university established centers. Observations and conferences are scheduled by the departmental supervisor.

    Credits: 12 cr.
  
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    SPE 4400L - SENIOR LAB: BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL


    This lab is designed to develop and refine professional competencies prior to accepting a teaching position.  Topics include current issues; school organization, administration, and law; teacher certification issues; collective bargaining and unions; philosophies of teaching; seeking a professional position; and beginning a teaching career. 

    Credits: 0 cr.
  
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    SPE 4420 - OBSERVATION AND PARTICIPATION - SPECIAL ED


    Observation and participation in classroom setting. Emphasizing teaching/learning process, selecting, organizing, and presenting lessons and materials. Projects and demonstrations required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1101.  Co-requisites:  SPE 3351, ELE 3383 and ELE 3384.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 4430 - TECHNOLOGY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION


    This course will highlight ways in which technology can be used to increase access to curriculum, instruction, and social activities for students with disabilities in the general and special education setting. Students will use and understand how assistive technologies can increase educational access and improve achievement for students with special needs. This course will explore types of assistive technologies and resources needed and required in schools, community, home, and in preparation for the workforce. This will include the review of evidence-based practices, various technologies available, a review of UDL and ways in which it supports technology integration, as well as the integration of augmentative technologies to support communication and learning in all settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take SPE-1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 4440 - INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES


    Teacher education candidates will study the nature and needs of children with moderate to severe disabilities.  Focus will be on the educational and transitional needs of these candidates.  The teacher education candidates will develop knowledge and skills in identification, assessment, educational techniques and strategies which are coupled with supportive measures, materials and techniques.  Use instructional adaptations such as assistive technology will be stressed.  A field component will be required. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE-2350.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 4445 - ADVANCED INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION


    This course provides organizational procedures, curriculum practice, methods and techniques used in educating mildly handicapped students K-12 in need of academic learning support. Emphasis is on direct teaching, collaborative practices, transitional planning, and curriculum adaptation.  This is achieved via large and small group class discussions, chapter readings, participation in a curriculum-based intervention in a general education classroom at the elementary level and other related exercises.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 2290 and SPE 2350.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPE 4450 - INTERNSHIP


    A supervised field experience in a professional setting serving individuals with disabilities.

    Credits: 12 cr.
  
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    SPE 4460 - PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR


    Designed to develop and refine the professional competencies of the special education major prior to the field experience and/or accepting a professional position. Coverage includes general orientation to the profession, current issues, school organization and administration, techniques for seeking a professional position, the scope of the field of special education, and professional responsibilities.

    Credits: 2 cr.
  
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    SPE 4465 - ETHICS, SCHOOL LAW, AND PROFESSIONAL COLLABORATION


    This course is an in-depth study of the legislation and litigation involved with individuals with disabilities specifically concentrating on those students between the ages of birth-21 years. A historical as well as current study of legislation used as the basis for providing special education services on the federal and state level will be covered. The legal system on the federal and state level is covered as well as critical litigations that have influenced the field of special education. The student will become knowledgeable about the legal precedence as well as state compliance timelines and requirements for all that they do as a special educator. Students will review and discuss process for ethical decision-making and apply those processes to case studies. Additionally, students will review effective collaboration practices related to inclusive practices and develop a plan for collaboration with other teachers, families, and community agencies.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE-1001

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    SPE 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 - 3 credits at one time.
  
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    SWK 1500 - SOCIAL WORK AND POPULAR CULTURE USING MOVIES


    Analyzes the Social Work profession as portrayed in popular culture.  Popular culture will be explained and defined.  The most current theories will be used to give the courses context.  Several movies representing popular culture will be viewed in order to synthesize the theories as they are applied to Social Work.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 1800 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK


    Introduces students to the profession of Social Work. Provides an overview of social work by familiarizing the students with a generalist perspective and includes issues such as diversity, populations at risk, and the values and ethics of the profession. Examines the history of the profession, social welfare policies, economic justice, and human behavior theories that are related to social work practice.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 2246 - PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY AND PRE-PRACTICE EXPERIENCE


    Builds upon the basic knowledge, values and ethics learned in introductory course with a student initiation into Social Work practice.  Course components include: an overview of the program curriculum and degree requirements, content about professional values and behavior, and the application of communication techniques and basic helping skills that will ground students in generalist practice.  Analysis of the ethical principles of the National Association of Social Workers will engage students in ethical-decision making.  Exploration of the dynamic context of practice requires the completion of a 30-hour shadow observation in a social work setting.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 2249 - PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS


    Familiarizes students with the use of communication skills in professional social work, including written, verbal, and non-verbal communication. Exposes students to APA style writing, library resources, and an introduction to verbal and non-verbal communication with clients. Requires the completion of an early field education experience.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    SWK 2500 - DIVERSITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE


    This online course increases awareness, knowledge, and understanding of issues related to diversity, human rights, social and economic justice.  Students will examine the history of social welfare and the social work profession’s response to oppression of at risk groups. Personal and interpersonal connections to power and privilege are explored. Topics include race and racism, classism, sexism, ableism, youth and elder oppression. Students will learn skills to mobilize power towards positive change in systems.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 2800 - SUBSTANCE USE & BEHAVIOR DISORDER COUNSELING FIELD PRACTICUM


    The Addiction and Substance use Field Practicum provides students with the hands on experience to refine the knowledge, values, ethics, and skills of the Addition and Substance use counselor for competent practice. The experience compels students to apply the various theory, skills, values, and perspectives they have been taught throughout their coursework. Students must complete 400 hours in a professional setting that provides service to individuals with substance use and behavior disorders.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take SWK 2246 & CHM 1105

    Credits: 12 Notes: Internship
  
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    SWK 3300 - HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT


    Focuses on the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments. Includes empirically based theories and knowledge that focus on the interactions between and among individuals, groups, societies, and economic systems. Includes theories and knowledge of biological, sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development across the life span; the range of social systems in which people live (individual, family, group, organizational, and community); and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3301 - HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I


    This course provides foundation knowledge of human behavior and the social environments as a basis for direct practice with individuals, families and groups. It includes theoretical and empirical knowledge of system interactions with people’s biological, sociological, cultural and psychological development across the life span. It
    examines the ways that social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3302 - HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II


    The course focuses on human behavior and the social environment from the prespective of larger groups, organizations and communities. It includes empirically based theories and knowledge that analyzes interactions between and among cultures, groups, societies, the natural environment, economic and political systems. Students will learn the skills to engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice to promote human and community well-being.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    SWK 3308 - EVALUATION RESEARCH


    Provides an understanding of a scientific, analytic, and ethical approach to building knowledge for social work practice through qualitative and quantitative research content. Prepares students to develop, use, and effectively communicate empirically based knowledge and critical thinking skills, including evidence-based interventions.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3315 - EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL WELFARE IN AMERICA


    Analyzes the history and evolution of social welfare services, the history of social work and major policies that form the foundation of social welfare. Includes the impact of social welfare on populations at risk and examines factors that contribute to and constitute being at risk. Provides knowledge of distributive justice, human and civil rights, and the global interconnections of oppression.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3320 - HEALTHY AGING AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE SKILLS


    Provides students from a variety of careers (such as social work and psychology) with an introduction to gerontology. Emphasizes a person-in-environment perspective to interacting with older persons and includes a practice-based component. Provides an opportunity for students to practice interaction skills with older persons. Offers current implications of aging in our complex, and increasingly older, modern society.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3321 - CHILD WELFARE


    Introduces students to the field of child welfare in social work. Students will explore issues affecting the lives of children in the United States and current services developed to meet children’s needs. The course is taught from a systems, strengths-based perspective.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3322 - TRAUMA IN SOCIAL WORK


    Introduces students to the issue of trauma and trauma treatment at both an individual and systems level.  Emphasis is placed upon the variety of variables which both contribute to and are impacted by trauma.  Analysis of key factors such as psychobiology, central nervous system involvement, impact and implication on intra psychic functioning, attachment and bonding, as well exploration and discussion around dynamics such as hyper vigilance, hyper arousal, re-enactment, repetition compulsion, flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, and disassociation will be explored at length.  Students will be trained in an “iinjury” model of assessment and treatment, with an emphasis on expanding the ability to think critically relative to these core functions, and the range of evidenced based interventions be introduced, from which students will learn to integrate the various models and apply theory to practice.  The issue of ethics in treatment will be interwoven throughout, as well as the principle and practice of self-care for the worker.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3323 - LEADERSHIP IN SOCIAL WORK


    Analyzes the variety of leadership roles available within the social work industry, with emphasis being placed upon leadership in the private, not-for-profit sector.  Various models of leadership and leadership theory will be introduced, and students will examine the unique role social work leaders play in the human service field and differentiate this from leadership in other venues.  Critical analysis and didactic learning around such key factors as strategic planning, supervision, human resource management, and fiscal planning will be addressed, as well as the ethical considerations and implications inherent in leadership in Social Work.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SWK 1800 and 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3324 - SOCIAL WORK AND HEALTH CARE


    Focuses on the application of social work in a variety of health care settings and is designed to develop a beginning knowledge of: medical terminology, physiology, health care systems and insurance issues, community factors, the effect of illness and disease on the patient and family members, cultural and ethical issues.  Critical practice issues considered will include theories of health behaviors, patient’s rights, assessment and intervention, religion, sexuality and social problems that affect health care.  Class activities, group exercises and case studies will encourage students to exhibit skills of problem-solving and effective communication with both clients and other members of the health care team.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3325 - PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE


    Analyzes issues and intervention strategies of social workers in a variety of settings regarding mental illness.  Understanding mental disorders from a  social work perspective will organize the course.  Problems frequently presented, treatment alternatives, interdisciplinary practice and ethical issues will be covered.  Knowledge of psychopharmacology and roles social workers play in medication management will be examined.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3326 - SOCIAL WORK AND CASE MANAGEMENT


    Analyzes issues and intervention strategies of social workers in a variety of settings requiring case management.  Principles of case management, problems frequently encountered, interdisciplinary practice and ethical issues will be covered.  Knowledge of case management and roles social workers play in it will be examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3327 - ADDICTION: ASSESSMENT, TREATMENT, & PREVENTION


    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the issues surrounding addiction as it pertains to alcohol and substance misuse. The course will explore the biological, psychological and social aspects of drug and alcohol use. Assessment, treatment and prevention are studied along with the ethnic and cultural dimensions of substance abuse. Forms of addictive behavior will be explored as well as underlying theoretical models that guide practice.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    SWK 3330 - SOCIAL POLICY


    Provides knowledge and skills to understand major social policies that form the current structure of social welfare services and the role of policy in service delivery, social work practice and attainment of individual and social well-being. Analyzes and researches organizational, local, state, national, and international issues in social welfare policy and social service delivery. Prepares students to influence, formulate and advocate for policy, consistent with social work values, as a means of alleviating poverty, oppression and other forms of social and economic injustice.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3350 - SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH SMALL GROUPS


    Focuses on ethical practice content that encompasses values, knowledge, and skills to work with GROUPS, including engaging clients in an appropriate working relationship; identifying needs, resources, and assets; collecting and assessing information; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; and planning for service delivery. Includes content on identifying, analyzing, and implementing empirically based interventions designed to achieve client goals, through the use of communication skills, supervision, and consultation. Emphasizes strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems, especially those populations at risk, in relation to their broader environments. Promotes strategies for effective practice with persons from diverse backgrounds and considers technological advances.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Social work candidacy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3351 - SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH COMMUNITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS


    Focuses on ethical practice content that encompasses values, knowledge, and skills to work with COMMUNITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS, including engaging clients in an appropriate working relationship; identifying needs, resources, and assets; collecting and assessing information; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; and planning for service delivery. Includes content on identifying, analyzing, and implementing empirically based interventions designed to achieve client goals, through the use of communication skills, supervision, and consultation. Emphasizes strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems, especially those populations at risk, in relation to their broader environments. Promotes strategies for effective practice with persons from diverse backgrounds and considers technological advances.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Social work candidacy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3352 - SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH FAMILIES


    Focuses on ethical practice content that encompasses values, knowledge, and skills to work with FAMILIES, including engaging clients in an appropriate working relationship; identifying needs, resources, and assets; collecting and assessing information; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; and planning for service delivery. Includes content on identifying, analyzing, and implementing empirically based interventions designed to achieve client goals, through the use of communication skills, supervision, and consultation. Emphasizes strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems, especially those populations at risk, in relation to their broader environments. Promotes strategies for effective practice with persons from diverse backgrounds and considers technological advances.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Social work candidacy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3353 - SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH INDIVIDUALS


    Focuses on ethical practice content that encompasses values, knowledge, and skills to work with INDIVIDUALS, including engaging clients in an appropriate working relationship; identifying needs, resources, and assets; collecting and assessing information; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; and planning for service delivery. Includes content on identifying, analyzing, and implementing empirically based interventions designed to achieve client goals, through the use of communication skills, supervision, and consultation. Emphasizes strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems, especially those populations at risk, in relation to their broader environments. Promotes strategies for effective practice with persons from diverse backgrounds and considers technological advances.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Social work candidacy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3452 - CHILD WELFARE PRACTICUM


    Students enrolled in the Child Welfare for Baccalaureates Program (CWEB) will complete a 475 hour practicum in a child welfare agency which meets the requirement of the state CWEB Program, reinforces students’ identification with the purposes, values, and ethics of the field of social work in child welfare, fosters the integration of empirical and practice-based knowledge, and promotes the development of professional competence for child welfare social work practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Enrollment in the CWEB Program.

    Co-requisites: SWK 3321.

    Credits: 1 cr.

  
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    SWK 4452 - FIELD EDUCATION


    Provides a 500 hour supervised field placement in an agency setting.  Field education reinforces students’ identification with the purposes, value, and ethics of the profession, fosters the integration of empirical and evidenced based practice knowledge, and promotes the development of professional competence for generalist social work practice.  Field Education incorporates a Capstone paper and presentation, which represents the culminating assignment for the Social Work program, and is designed to focus on the integration of the curriculum with the Field Education experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Completion of all SWK major required courses with the exception of SWK 4453, and the acceptance of the Field Education Application by the Faculty Evaluation Committee. Co-requisite: SWK 4453.

    Credits: 12 cr.
  
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    SWK 4453 - FIELD SEMINAR


    Taken concurrently with SWK 4452, this seminar integrates the field experience with the knowledge, values, ethics, and skills of the social work profession for competent generalist practice. Prepares students for active participation in the process of supervision and addresses issues of diversity, populations at risk, and social and economic justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisite: SWK 4452.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    SWK 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
  •  

    WLC 2500 - INTRODUCTION TO PARIS


    This course is an introduction to everyday life in Paris, at once a global modern city and a living museum.  Paris is a vibrant culture and commercial hub and the academic place of excellence in France, a city of continuity and change, of love and conflicts - the home of expatriates, artists, romantics, and revolutionaries of every kind.  We will study the history and geography of Paris and trace the city’s evolution, from its Roman arena to its Eiffel Tower, from the Louvre’s medieval foundations to its ultra-modern glass pyramid.  We will look at architecture, painting, sculpture, music, literature, film, and popular culture and study how they express ways of life over the centuries.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    WLC 2510 - INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN FILM


    This course is taught in English and introduces students to film as a mirror of German culture, offering a cross-section of typical sociopolitical and cultural themes.  Topics might include Expressionist films and their relation to art and literature, films from divided Germany with perspectives from West and East, films about coming to grips with the Nazi German past, and trends in German cinema since the reunification in 1990.  Students will become acquainted with some of the important figures in German films and will examine contemporary issues in society via the film medium.  Evaluations include class discussion, reaction papers, quizzes, exams, and projects.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    WLC 2520 - INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN CULTURES


    This course will expose students to the major cultural transformations that have shaped the development of many of the Latin American civilizations from the pre-Columbian period to the present.  Course topics may include Ancient Americas, the Conquest, the Colonial World, the creation of the Nation State, Globalization, and Intervention and Diaspora.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    WLC 3300 - PHONETICS AND LANGUAGE STRUCTURES


    This course is a general introduction to phonetics and language structures, open to all students and taught in English.  Students can expect to study the speech organs and how this knowledge helps to articulate and pronounce foreign language words with more precision and better sentence rhythm, and they will learn how to use the International Phonetic Alphabet.  The themes of this class may also include:  communication systems, common language structures, language dialects, regional pronunciation patterns, word and sentence structures, origins of puzzling phenomena in English, language acquisition, and identity.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    WLC 3310 - LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION


    In this course, students will explore the cultures of the French, German and Spanish speaking worlds by reading a representative selection of literary works in translation.  Students can expect to read, study, and discuss a representative sample of translated texts in all of these languages and in all of the major literary genres.  A variety of themes will be covered in this course, some of which include: gender, mythology, sports, voices of resistance, stereotyping, modernity, family, immigration, diaspora, civil rights, etc. Throughout the course, students will reflect on cultural differences in thought, aesthetic style, and thematic emphasis.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    WLC 3320 - FRANCE THROUGH FILM


    This course gives students an opportunity to look at a culture other than their own through its representation in films, and helps them discover unknown aspects of their own culture through the examination of a foreign one. While watching a selection of French movies (in French with English subtitles), we will explore aspects of recent French history and their influence contemporary French culture; reflect on the interaction of various cultural (social) systems in France and other French-speaking communities; work on analytical skills; learn how to read film, literature, essays and relate them to a historical/social/cultural background. The films chosen illustrate key periods of French society from the pre-Revolutionary period to the beginning of the 21st century.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take ENG 1112

    Credits: 3cr

  
  •  

    WLC 3336 - GERMANY A VIRTUAL TOUR


    By means of an imaginary trip through the states of contemporary Germany, this course offers a detailed overview of the country’s geography, major cities and towns, regional identities, and tourist destinations and curiosities within each region. Along the way, pertinent information about economy, customs, cultural idiosyncrasies, architecture, history, technological developments, and many other aspects is discussed. Students gain insight into their own way of life and culture through frequent comparison with German culture throughout the course “trip.” Extensive use is made of Internet resources, along with other print and audiovisual materials, supported and evaluated by class discussions, brief presentations, quizzes and tests, and a final project.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 Earned Credits

    Credits: 3crs
  
  •  

    WLC 3340 - FRENCH GRAPHIC LITERATURE


    This course explores major directions of French graphic literature since the early 20th century. Reading French-language “bandes dessinees” (comic strips, or graphic novels) in English translations helps us discover aspects of French and French-speaking culture. Representative texts include “comic” (funny) strips playing with stereotypical representations of cultures in history or science-fiction, short stories representing current events and social situations in France, “serious” graphic literature interpreting  major social or historical events, and/or literary works in the French language. Students reflect on intercultural representations in France and other French-speaking places while analyzing comics within their complex background of social, cultural, historical events.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 or 30 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    WLC 3350 - CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN FILM


    Contemporary Latin American Film is an overview of Latin America history, culture, and art through film.  The general objective of the course is to foster an understanding of the key historical, social, and artistic movements represented in a selection of Latin American films. Some of the topics to be included in this course are: class struggle and conflict, the role of women in contemporary Latin American history, the Mexican revolution, the Cuban revolution, human rights, nationalism, Latin America-United States relations, bilingualism, multiculturalism, exile and diaspora, the “lettered city”, and narrative transculturation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 30 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr
  
  •  

    WLC 4400 - GLOBAL EXPERIENCE


    This is a culminating course for students completing the WLC major, designed to help them reflect upon what they learned about a second language and culture during their study at MU and abroad, and to integrate and synthesize their international intercultural experiences. To meet this course’s requirements, students will have completed at least one of the WLC core courses and an approved study-abroad program (or approved equivalent experience) in which they earned at least 9 hours of upper-division academic credit. After their return to Mansfield, students will prepare a paper based on an original research project approved prior to their departure. While they study abroad, students will collect data for the project; their report will be written, revised and presented in WLC 4400 (artifact to be added to student portfolio).

    Prerequisites & Notes: 9cr of Study abroad and approval of Modern language department chair.

    Credits: 3cr
  
  •  

    WLC 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline.
    The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field. May be taken for one,
    two or three credits at one time.

    Variable Credits: 1-3cr
  
  •  

    WS 1100 - INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S STUDIES


    Cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural examination of the ways that language, images, and socialization have constructed women’s roles. Examines contemporary women’s issues (work and family, sexuality, violence against women), as well as the women’s movement and the role of women artists. Emphasis is on students (both female and male) working to discover the impact of these roles and issues in their own lives as well as in the larger world.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    WS 2909 - WOMEN OUTDOORS


    This course approaches the experience and perception of women outdoors from a variety of disciplines-rhetoric, cultural geography, recreations and leisure studies, history, and literature-all from a feminist perspective. We read essays giving an analytical framework for the books and films by women who hunt, fish, rock climb, mountain bike and surf. We explore issues such as how our cultural views and metaphorical constructs of women and nature affect participation in outdoor recreation, how women involved with recreation are talked to and about as compared to men, and what all this means for women who participate in outdoor recreation and for men who work or play outdoors with women.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Minimum 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: REC 2909
  
  •  

    WS 4410 - SEMINAR IN WOMEN’S STUDIES


    An in-depth examination of a topic in Women’s Studies including women’s contributions, knowledge, and perceptions taught from a cross-disciplinary, cross-cultural perspective in seminar style. This serves as the capstone course for the Women’s Studies minor.

    Prerequisites & Notes: WS 1100, two other Women’s Studies courses, and junior standing or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for a total of 9 credits.
  
  •  

    WSM 1625L - WATERSHED MANAGEMENT LAB


    This is a field-based laboratory that investigates surface water in the context of watershed management. Students will collect data and solve problems related to stream discharge, water quality, and sediment dynamics. Students will produce written reports detailing field methods, analysis methods, and interpretations.

    Credits: 0cr
  
  •  

    WSM 3010 - WATERSHED SYSTEMS


    This watershed course focuses on system analysis of the physical, chemical and biological interactions of watersheds. It will consider procedures used to characterize the human, aquatic, riparian, and upland features. It will look at conditions, processes and interactions within a watershed, including lakes and rivers. The system analysis at the watershed level provides a systematic way to understand and organize information for the purpose of understanding the consequences of management actions prior to implementation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: WSM 1625 & WSM 1625L.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    WSM 3020 - PRACTICUM


    An out-of-class learning experience that allows students to observe or participate in applied work.  Practicums are graded S or U - they do not affect your GPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 - 5 crs. Notes: May be repeated for a total of five credits. 
  
  •  

    WSM 3300 - GLOBAL WATER ISSUES


    This course introduces students to fundamentals of water issues around the world, and how they affect the development, design, evolution and sustainability of societies and economic viability. Included will be discussion of case examples where conflicts over water allocations, drought limitations, water quality problems and catastrophic floods are damaging societies and international relations. Students will be exposed to and discuss current and developing methods for reducing such problems in support of more sustainable societies.

    Credits: 3cr
  
  •  

    WSM 3500 - WATERSHED RESTORATION


    An advanced course in Watershed Management that covers various aspects of watershed restoration including: what it is, how its accomplished, and who carries it out.  Also covers the scientific approach to watershed assessment and the role of public education in restoration activities.  Field work is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: WSM 1625.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Professional Electives
  
  •  

    WSM 4496 - INTERNSHIP


    Offers practical work experience and the opportunity to apply and to further develop appropriate skills.  All internships will be grades S or U - they do not affect your QPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 6 - 12 cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 1010 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY I


    Course content provides an introduction to the basic elements of radiologic technology. Students will discuss and evaluate mediolegal issues, professionalism in radiology, radiation protection practices, and radiologic terms. This course is a professional course within the Radiology Technology curriculum and radiology students are given preference. With instructor permission, course enrollment is open to any university student.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 1020 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY II


    The goal of this course is to present a basic introduction to imaging equipment operation and concepts of patient care. Students will also learn radiographic examination considerations for the extremities, spine, shoulder girdle, pelvic girdle and bony thorax.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take XRT 1010, BSC 1121, and MA 1128.

    Credits: 5cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 1030 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY III


    Course content acquaints the student with principles of radiation exposure and concepts of radiation biology.  Emphasis will be placed on radiographic examinations of the biliary, urinary, and digestive systems. Basic contrast studies and pediatric radiography is also presented. Drug pharmacology and radiographic contrast media will be discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take XRT-1020 and BSC-1122.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 1040 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY IV


    Course content is designed to impart an understanding of the components, principles and operation of digital imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology. Factors that impact exposure factors, image acquisition, display, archiving/retrieval, and image quality are included. This course also includes  radiographic examinations of the cranium, mobile, and trauma radiography and a review of previously learned concepts from other professional courses.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take XRT 1030.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 1104 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY IV


    Course content acquaints students with the principles of radiographic film processing. Emphasis will be placed on radiographic examinations of the cranium, mobile radiography, and trauma radiography. Students will learn concepts related to image analysis and review introductory radiographic concepts presented in previous professional courses.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1103.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 1105 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY V


    This course includes the study of pathology and disease, computed tomography (CT), and quality assurance.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1040.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 1106 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY VI


    The purpose of this course is to review the knowledge and skills underlying the performance of the major tasks typically required of an entry-level diagnostic radiographer. Students will also become familiar with the basic concept of technical reporting and evaluation. (Pre-requisite: XRT 1105).

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1105.

     

    Credits: 4 cr.

  
  •  

    XRT 1107 - FUNDAMENTALS OF RADIOLOGIC SCIENCE AND HEALTH CARE


    Content is designed to provide an overview of the foundations in radiography and the practitioner’s role in the health care delivery system. Principles, practices and policies of the health care organization(s) will be examined and discussed in addition to professional responsibilities of the radiographer.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XTR 1010, BSC 1121 and MA 1128.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 1108 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR THE RADIOGRAPHER


    Students will be introduced to the origins of medical terminology and the word-building system used in the medical field. The words, abbreviations, and symbols used in the medical environment will be discussed. An orientation to the understanding of radiographic orders and interpretation of diagnostic reports will be addressed through the related terminology.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1010, BSC 1121, and MA 1128.

    Credits: 2 cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 2203 - X-RAY PHYSICS


    This course will provide the student will knowledge of basic radiologic physics. Atomic theory, nature and characteristics of radiation, x-ray production, and fundamentals of photon interactions with matter are discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1030.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    XRT 2221 - CLINICAL COURSE I


    The main purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the proper operation and utilization of modern diagnostic radiologic equipment. Initially, students will receive a general orientation regarding the clinical facilities and policies. While under the direct supervision of clinical faculty and registered radiographers, students will perform the radiographic examinations presented in course XRT 1020. Students are required to demonstrate and practice the competencies, which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1010, BSC 1121, and MA 1128.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
  •  

    XRT 2222 - CLINICAL COURSE II


    Students will practice the competencies acquired in the previous clinical course and begin working towards achieving competency for radiographic examinations presented in course XRT 1030. Clinical rotations will begin in the specialty areas. Students are required to demonstrate and practice the competencies which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1020 and XRT 2221.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
  •  

    XRT 2223 - CLINICAL COURSE III


    Students will continue to practice the competencies acquired in the previous clinical courses while working towards achieving competency for examinations of the skull. Emphasis will be placed on radiographic examinations from courses XRT 1020, XRT 1030, and XRT 1040. Clinical rotations will continue in the specialty areas. Students will also begin an evening clinical rotation which emphasizes trauma radiography. Students are required to demonstrate and practice competencies which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1030, and XRT 2222.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
  •  

    XRT 2224 - CLINICAL COURSE IV


    Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate competency for general diagnostic examinations of most systems of the body, while continuing to practice the competencies acquired in previous clinical course. Training will begin in the areas of nuclear medicine and vascular imaging and will continue to magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. Students are required to demonstrate and practice the competencies, which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1040, and XRT 2223.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
  •  

    XRT 2225 - CLINICAL COURSE V


    During this final clinical practicum, students will complete clinical assignments that require the demonstration of competencies in a wide variety of general diagnostic entry-level radiologic examinations. Students will have a final opportunity to practice competencies achieved in previous clinical practice. Clinical rotations through the specialty areas will be completed. Students are required to demonstrate and practice the competencies which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    (Pre-requisites: XRT 1105 and XRT 2224.)

     

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1105 and XRT 2224.

    Corequisite: XRT 1106.

    Credits: 3 cr.

 

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