Oct 04, 2022  
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    CHM 4420 - QUALITATIVE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY


    The identification of organic compounds by various classical and instrumental techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CHM 3302.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CHM 4421 - ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY


    An advanced lecture course designed to deepen and expand knowledge in the field. Topics such as reactions, mechanisms, reactive intermediates, photochemistry, kinetics, stereochemistry, natural products, and spectroscopy may be stressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CHM 3302 and CHM 3321.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CHM 4431 - ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY


    A presentation of atomic structure and periodic properties. In addition to other topics; valence bond, molecular orbital, crystal and ligand field theories are treated. Laboratory sessions include one hour of lecture on theory and techniques in the preparation of representative compounds.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CHM 1112 and CHM 3321.

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
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    CHM 4432 - STRUCTURAL CHEMISTRY


    The symmetry and structural properties of molecular systems are utilized to determine their energy levels. The electronic and vibrational spectroscopic properties of these systems will be predicted also utilizing symmetry properties. These spectra-structure correlations will be made on organic and inorganic systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CHM 3302 and CHM 3321.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CHM 4490 - PROBLEMS IN CHEMISTRY


    Involves the student in study projects under the direct supervision of an instructor. Library and laboratory research in selected problems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for one through three credits.
  
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    CHM 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
  •  

    CHN 1101 - INTRODUCTORY CHINESE I


    For students with little or no prior experience in Chinese (Mandarin) language. Skills are taught within a cultural context and include pronunciation, speaking, and listening comprehension skills, as well as an introduction to the Chinese writing system. 

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CHN 1102 - INTRODUCTORY CHINESE II


    A continuation of CHN-1101, Introductory Chinese I.  Skills are taught within a cultural context and include pronunciation, speaking, and listening comprehension skills, as well as an introduction to the Chinese writing system. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: CHN 1101.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    CIS 1000 - ORIENTATION TO CIS


    Required for all CIS majors. Introduces students to the structure and organization of the computing field. Also covers topics such as professional, ethical, legal, security, and social responsibilities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    CIS 1102 - VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING


    Introduces problem solving through the use of the programming language, Visual Basic. Enables students to write programs, which they can use for Windows development, scientific computing, spreadsheet design, and database work.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 1103 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTERS


    Introduces an operating System for microcomputers and the use of word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    CIS 1109 - EXPLORATIONS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE


    This course gives the student a general introduction to the foundations and principles of computer science. Elements of software development and object-oriented programming are introduced. Students will learn basic, fundamental programming constructs using a real-world programming language. Topics may include handling computer input and output, user interfaces, 2D and 3D graphics, animation, sound, games, and multimedia.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CIS 1115 - PROGRAMMING WITH OBJECTS


    Introduction to computer-based problem solving and programming using a high-level language. Topics include problem solving methodologies, program design, algorithm development, and testing. Language concepts include variables, data types and expressions, assignment, control-flow statements, arrays, sorting, functions, and classes and objects.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisites:  CIS 1115L.

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
  •  

    CIS 1115L - PROGRAMMING WITH OBJECTS LAB


    Guided programming exercises in support of concepts taught in CIS 1115.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisites: CIS 1115.

    Credits: 0 cr.
  
  •  

    CIS 2203 - SOFTWARE FOR BUSINESS APPLICATIONS


    Advanced applications of spreadsheets, data base management systems, and graphics.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    CIS 2206 - BUSINESS PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS I


    An introduction to analyzing and designing solutions to business-related problems using a business programming language.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 1115.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3300 - PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES


    Comparative study of current programming languages. Examines the structure of languages and their use in problem solving.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3315

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    CIS 3303 - WEB SITE DESIGN


    An introduction to the principles of Web Site Design. The syntax and semantics of HTML is covered. Multimedia elements will also be introduced.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    CIS 3304 - ADVANCED WEB DESIGN


    This course introduces modern techniques in advanced web design. Topics include advanced CSS and XHTML, JavaScript, AJAX, DOM, advanced graphic elements for web design, and using forms to acquire input. Other advanced topics may be discussed, including Rich Internet Applications and server-side development.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CIS-3303; and CIS-1115 or CIS-1102 or CIS-1109

    Credits: 3
  
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    CIS 3305 - COMPUTER SECURITY AND ETHICS


    This course addresses issues related to computer security and ethics. Students are expected to develop basic understanding of important concepts and theories in these areas and be able to apply them in the real world. Major topics include: theories of ethical decision-making, information privacy, professional and ethical responsibilities, microcomputer security, network and telecommunications security, and encryption techniques.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    CIS 3306 - BUSINESS PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS II


    A second course in business programming stressing data processing and advanced programming techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 1115

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3308 - OPERATIONS RESEARCH


    The development and use of the techniques of operations research. Topics include linear programming, queuing theory, probabilistic inventory models and simulation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CIS 2203 or 3315; MA 1125 or 3314; MA 1129, 3260 or 3280; MA 1170 or 2231.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3309 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS


    This is an introductory course to computer-based information systems (CBIS) with emphasis on information processing systems as a tool for management of organizations. This course requires that students learn to use software and hardware to facilitate managerial decision-making, planning, and control.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 1115 or CIS 2203.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3311 - SOFTWARE ENGINEERING


    This is an introductory course which covers the application of engineering principles to the building of computer software. It provides a general overview to the field of Software Engineering. Topics may include theories, tools, and methods for the systematic representation, design, implementation, verification, validation, management, and maintenance of computer software systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3315.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3315 - DATA STRUCTURES


    Introduces fundamental data structures such as arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Other more advanced topics may include recursion, sorting and hashing.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 1115.

    Co-Requisites:  CIS 3315L.

    Credits: 4 cr.

  
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    CIS 3315L - DATA STRUCTURES LAB


    Guided programming exercises in support of concepts taught in CIS 3315.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 1115.

    Co-Requisites:  CIS 3315.

    Credits: 0 cr.

  
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    CIS 3320 - COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE


    Classification of computers. Defining hardware and software interfaces within a computer system. Special purpose architectures.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3325 - OPERATING SYSTEMS


    Functions and characteristics of an operating system: concurrent processes, system nucleus, memory management, input and output, filing system, resource allocation and scheduling, system protection and reliability, and job control.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3315 and CIS 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3330 - COMPUTER ORGANIZATION


    Overview of computer hardware, computer structure, machine representation of information, instruction codes, addressing, concepts of digital logic, microprogramming and assembly language programming.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 1115.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3340 - DATABASE SYSTEMS


    First course in the theory and use of database management systems. Provides experience in the creation of an actual database system and the manipulation of the data in it.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3309 or CIS 3315.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3350 - ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS


    An introduction to the study of the theory and design of algorithms. Topics may include analysis of Abstract Data Types (ADTs), NP-Completeness, study of various graph algorithms, searching and sorting algorithms, and a look at algorithm design techniques such as greedy algorithms, divide and conquer, dynamic programming, and branch-and-bound.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3315.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3360 - MOBILE APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT


    This course explores the trends, designs and deployment issues of mobile application development, covers mobile platforms, mobile browsers, mobile devices, mobile computing and interface designs, emphasizes the process of creating mobile applications, and identifies the main technologies used in the realm of mobile application development.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CIS-1115

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    CIS 3370 - BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE


    This course provides an understanding of data organization and examines the Business Intelligence (BI) processes and techniques used in transforming data to information and knowledge. The course introduces concepts and terminology, various kinds of applications, how to build and use the BI and analytics infrastructure, and different data access and analysis tools.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CIS-3309

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    CIS 3390 - NETWORKING 1


    Introduction to the underlying principles of networking. Concepts of network protocols and network applications are covered. TCP/IP principles will be taught.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3315.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3397 - CIS PRACTICUM


    The CIS practicum gives students the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills in computer and Information Science while working with a private or public agency. This practical experience augments the skills learned in the classroom. Permission of advisor required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 60 earned credits and permission of advisor.

    Credits: 1 - 5 cr.
  
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    CIS 4309 - E-COMMERCE SYSTEMS


    This course provides tools, skills, and an understanding of technology, business concepts and issues that surround the emergence of electronic commerce. The student develops an understanding of the current practices and opportunities in electronic publishing, electronic shopping, electronic distribution, and electronic collaboration. The student also explores several of the problem areas in electronic commerce.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3303 or CIS 3309 or CIS 3340.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4400 - CIS SENIOR SEMINAR


    Capstone course giving students an opportunity to explore current research and areas of interest in computing and information systems. Topics may vary.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    CIS 4410 - MIS SEMINAR


    A seminar on current topics in computer-based information systems (CBIS), which examines state-of-the-art issues associated with the design, development, implementation, control and management of computer-based information systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3309 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4420 - SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN COMPUTER APPLICATIONS


    Study of a specialized topic. Possible topics include Computer Aided Design, Data Base Systems, Telecommunications, Advanced Business Programming.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4440 - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE


    The application of computers to solve problems and to understand the principles of human intelligence including search, reasoning, and problem reduction. Applications to games, expert systems, natural language, learning, robotics, and computer vision.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3315.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4450 - ORGANIZATIONAL INTERNSHIP


    Supervised and evaluated participation in the regular activities of a business, government, agency, or appropriate organization. In consultation with the supervising faculty member, the student is expected to prepare a comprehensive final report relating to the work accomplished during the field experience.

    Credits: 6 - 12 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 12 credits. No more than 6 credits count toward the major.
  
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    CIS 4460 - SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN


    This course provides an introduction to Systems Analysis and Design. Topics include: the systems development life cycle; organization, data, and process modeling; structured and object-oriented analysis and design. Students will also learn about input and output design, database design, usability issues, human-computer interaction, quality assurance and implementation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3306 and CIS 3340

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    CIS 4470 - SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION & PROJECT MANAGEMENT


    This course will provide an opportunity for students to combine and apply knowledge from prior classes to implement a project. It also describes the problems of managing and implementing a project within an organization for the purpose of achieving a specific objective. It will broadly cover the operational and conceptual issue faced by modern project managers.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite:CIS 4460

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    CIS 4490 - NETWORKING II


    Second course in data and computer communications. Communication principles, computer requirements, networking, standards, and future trends and issues will be examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CIS 3390 and CIS 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1, 2 or 3 credits at one time.
  
  •  

    CJA 1100 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE


    An introduction to the field of criminal justice, its major components, roles and functions. Emphasis is placed upon concepts of law and the historical descriptive analysis of the police, courts, and corrections.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 2200 - SURVEY OF POLICING


    Introduction to law enforcement problems and practices; its legal, political, and historical framework. An analysis of police organizations and their relationship with other criminal justice and social agencies.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 2201 - SURVEY OF CORRECTIONS


    Origin and history of incarceration practices and procedures; associated organizational, criminological and penological concepts; categories of inmates and laws affecting classification; special custody problems and treatment programs, staff organization; professional, administrative and custodial personnel training, recruitment and promotions; interagency relationships and cooperation; release programs, furloughs, work-release, and final discharge.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 2220 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS


    An introduction to research methodology with particular emphasis place on criminal justice issues. Examines research theory, its major components, statistics, and its application to various criminal justice agencies in the areas of police, courts, and corrections.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CJA 1100.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    CJA 2225 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY


    Provides and understanding of the discipline of criminology through an examination of its theories, basic assumptions, and definitions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CJA 1100.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 2350 - VICTIMOLOGY


    This course explores the field of victimology along with the development and scope of the victim’s movement. Attention is also given to issues associated with violent crime victimization,  the victim-offender relationship, and ways in which various criminal justice personnel can serve the interests of crime victims.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take: CJA 1100, CJA 2200, and CJA 2201.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 2400 - CRIMES OF THE CENTURY


    An examination of select iconic crimes occurring over the last 100 years. Emphasis will be placed on cases that have redefined historical eras and culture, generated wide publicity and opinion about crime, and influenced the social, political, and legal landscape of America.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take: CJA 1100, CJA 2200, and CJA 2201.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    CJA 3262 - CRIMINAL INTERVIEWING AND INTERROGATION


    An advanced approach to understanding criminal interviews and interrogations. Special attention will be given to such topics as verbal and non-verbal deception, interview/interrogation structure, and techniques used to obtain confessions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CJA 1100, CJA 2200, and CJA 2201 or SCI 1104.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3354 - CRIMINAL LAW


    This course is designed to give students an understanding of the origins and purposes of criminal law, the constitutional limitations on criminal law, and the general principles of criminal liability and defenses to criminal liability. The definitions and various elements of crimes of most frequent concern will also be examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CJA 1100, 2200, & 2201.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3355 - CONSTITUTIONAL CRIMINAL PROCEDURE


    The theme of this course is centered on balancing the values which are central to our constitutional democracy; community security and individual liberty.  The Constitutional basis for the law of criminal procedure will be explored by reading and discussing Supreme Court decisions regarding Due Process, Equal Protection, arrest, search and seizure.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CJA 1100, CJA 2200 and CJA 2201.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3357 - CORRECTIONAL STRATEGIES


    Offender classification; special offender groups, treatment, custody, recidivism, and strategies designed to change offender conduct.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CJA 1100, 2200, & 2201.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3365 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY


    This course assesses past and current prevention strategies used in the criminal justice system.

    Special importance will be placed on theoretical underpinnings of crime and prevention strategies, research methodology and evaluation, and program effectiveness.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CJA 1100, CJA 2200, CJA 2201, & CJA 2225.

    Credits: 3cr.

  
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    CJA 3380 - VIOLENT CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR


    Introduces the leading theories and research on violent criminal behavior. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the violent offender and the victim of the offender. Attention is given to predicting dangerous offenders while examining the specific crimes of murder, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CJA 1100 and CJA 2225.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    CJA 3385 - COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS


    Course provides a comparative analysis of various criminal justice systems throughout the world. The course will focus on understanding the origin and operation of foreign criminal justice systems, while specifically identifying similarities and differences with the criminal justice system in the United States.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CJA 1100, 2200 & 2201.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    CJA 3395 - DELINQUENCY AND THE JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM


    An examination of the delinquency problem and its causes, potential prevention strategies, and rehabilitation programs. The course will also examine the legal rights of the juvenile offender and the evolution of those rights from a constitutional perspective.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CJA 1100, CJA 2200 and CJA 2201.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3400 - CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE


    An examination of the nature and extent of crime in modern society. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary criminal justice issues selected from, but not limited to, terrorism, organized crime, white collar crime, victimless crime, corruption, human trafficking, and serial murder.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take: CJA 1100, CJA 2200, CJA 2201.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    CJA 4300 - WHITE COLLAR CRIME


    This course explores the evolution, nature and extent of white-collar crime along with how it is investigated, prosecuted and punished. Particular emphasis is placed on discussing specific types of white collar crimes, financial and victimization costs, and criminal justice and societal responses to white collar crime.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take: CJA 1100, CJA 2200, CJA 2201, and CJA 2225.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    CJA 4305 - TERRORISM


    This course examines the history of terrorism, the meaning of the term, specific examples of the topic, and terrorist groups active in the world today. The purpose of the course is to give students a broad overview of terrorism, as this subject relates to criminology and criminal justice. The student is encouraged to think of terrorism as a topic of study that is part of the criminal justice world, and also as a subject that is unique to itself.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take: CJA 1100, CJA 2200, CJA 2201, CJA 2220.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    CJA 4350 - ORGANIZED CRIME


    This course provides an overview of organized crime, both in the United States and transnationally. Focus is placed on the evolution and nature of organized crime, application of criminological theory to the understanding of organized crime, examination of multiple organized crime groups, along with legislative and law enforcement approaches used to curtail the organized crime phenomenon.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CJA 1100, CJA 2200, CJA 2201, & CJA 2225.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4425 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE ETHICS


    Explores a variety of ethical and moral issues, in practice and theory, relating to the field of criminal justice and criminology. Attention will be placed on the specific problems and diverse perspectives associated with the operation and implementation of justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CJA 1100, CJA 2200,CJA 2201 & CJA 2225.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4450 - INTERNSHIP


    An opportunity for upper division students to synthesize academic coursework within a professional criminal justice environment in their chosen area of concentration. The goal of the internship is to offer the student an opportunity to explore a particular field of interest and determine if there is enough interest to pursue if after graduation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CJA 1100, CJA 2200, CJA 2201; at least 15 total credits in CJA; at least junior standing or 90 credits and approval of department faculty.

    Credits: 6 - 12 cr. Notes: May be taken for 6 through 12 credits.
  
  •  

    CJA 4453 - POLICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION


    Organizational theory, budgeting, personnel management planning, information management theory, civil service, unions, management prerogatives, supervision, executive development, manpower distribution schemes, and policy development and execution as applied in both small and large law enforcement agencies.

    Prerequisites & Notes: CJA 1100 and CJA 2200.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4475 - SERIAL MURDER


    A broad overview of serial, spree and mass murder in the U.S. during the 20th century. Examines the myths and social construction of serial murder, FBI involvement, crime scene analysis, the organized and disorganized offender, and crime scene, history of serial murder in the U.S., construction of profiling, and behavior typology, and also examines offender typology (gender, race and team serial killers).

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CJA 1100, 2200, & 2201.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    CJA 4490 - SENIOR SEMINAR


    This is a capstone course designed to: 1) help seniors integrate the knowledge gained from their other criminal justice courses; 2) assist them in developing analytical thinking skills through focusing on several selected topics; and 3) to instill confidence that they have acquired a core body of knowledge that will assist them when they enter a criminal justice agency or graduate school.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    CJA 4496 - SELECTED TOPICS


    A thorough investigation of a selected topic, particular problem or case study in criminal justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take CJA 1100, 2200, & 2201.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    CJA 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1, 2 or 3 credits at one time.
  
  •  

    CJA 4505 - SERIAL MURDER CASE STUDY


    The course will introduce the student to the world and mind of the serial killer through an in-depth examination of a case study of one such offender, namely Jack the Ripper. The student will examine the typology of serial murder from the perspective of the crime and the offender, and from the world of the investigative criminal justice practitioner. The student will explore this case based on social factors, victimology, law enforcement, forensic science, and the media.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take: CJA 1100, CJA 2200, CJA 2201.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    COM 1101 - ORAL COMMUNICATION


    Objectives are to help the student to formulate his/her own ideas coherently, evaluate factual material, and use sound reasoning patterns in his/her preparation and attempts to communicate concepts orally; to determine and select the most effective means of expression in formal and informal speaking situations. Required of all Mansfield students.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    COM 1102 - EFFECTIVE PUBLIC SPEAKING


    Introduces students to the principles of effective communication, with a specific focus on public speaking.  Course topic includes audience analysis, organizational structure, the use of supplementary visual and auditory aids, components of different types of speeches, and delivery elements.  Students will develop public speaking skills through activities, collaborative learning, peer critiques, and analysis of public speeches and other messages.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    COM 1103 - SPEAKING EFFECTIVELY IN GROUPS


    Introduces students to principles of effective communication with a specific focus on speaking formally and informally in groups.
    Course topics include the basics of communication, developing effective speaking skills in a group context, group dynamics, teamwork, and problem-solving.  Students will participate in various types of group presentations and engage in analytical message critique.  This course enables students to work more effectively in groups, develop teams, lead, and make effective group and individual presentations.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    COM 2201 - INTRODUCTION TO MASS MEDIA


    Studies the application of modern mass media, its origin, history, theory, principles, and philosophy to the areas of entertainment, instruction, and audience persuasion.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    COM 2205 - INTERPRETING COMMUNICATION RESEARCH


    Interpreting Communication Research examines the methods used to collect human communication research and the skills critical to evaluating and reporting research results.  Students will become critical consumers of research and skilled in data collection (e.g. survey construction, interviewing, focus groups, observation, etc.) and analysis through the SPSS program.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 1101, COM 1102 or COM 1103.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    COM 2208 - INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONIC MEDIA


    This course examines the history, background, structure, current operations, effects and theories of the various electronic media industries such as television, radio, film, and the internet.  This course also introduces electronic media students to basic production equipment, terminology and skills.  Media is a foundations course that provides students the tools and knowledge to succeed in more advanced electronic media courses and broaden understanding of the interrelationships between society, culture and electronic media industries.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    COM 2209 - COMMUNICATION IN THE DIGITAL AGE


    This course is designed to examine the impact of new media and information technology on our daily lives, going beyond technical and how-to issues to examine how new media affects our communication practices with others.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    COM 2210 - INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC RELATIONS


    Study of public relations and its role as a management function that develops relationships between organizations and their publics.   Principles, theories, and practice of public relations will be examined.  Ethical considerations and social media impact are considered.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    COM 2211 - PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING


    This course will offer a broad overview of advertising background issues and functions.  The course will explore the historical, social, cultural, legal, and economic influences on advertising.  The course will also cover the basic principles and practices of the advertising industry.  Students will be introduced to the creative/media strategy decision processes. 

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    COM 2214 - SPORTS AND THE MEDIA


    This is an introductory course designed to study the relationships of the sports media to the sports industry as well as the opportunities for and responsibilities of sports media professionals who cover it. The historical, ethical, legal, cultural, and economic considerations related to sports and various sports media in the U.S. and around the world will be examined. This course examines the impact sports and the media have had and are continuing to have on each other.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    COM 2220 - ELECTRONIC MEDIA HISTORY


    An introduction to the American electronic media systems which examines the history of the media and relates it to current issues in the industries.  The course utilizes historical programming examples, examines various electronic media technology, and develops student awareness of the importance of electronic media in our society.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    COM 2221 - INTERPERSONAL CONFLICT


    Conflict and its management are critical issues that pervade all aspects of life. This course will explore the nature and complexities of conflict, influences on conflict and the causes of conflict in relationships (intimate, friendships, and family), in groups, and in the workplace. This course focuses on the skills and strategies in managing conflict more effectively.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    COM 2230 - WRITING FOR ELECTRONIC MEDIA


    A basic course in the writing techniques used in American electronic media.  The course focuses on the development of original ideas for a range of commercial and promotional needs, including an original video series.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: COM 2208 or professor permission.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 2250 - SPECIAL PROJECTS


    A project initiated by the student to increase his/her knowledge in an advanced area not offered as a regular class.  Intensive study of a subject area under the guidance of a faculty member who has special expertise in that subject.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3270 - AUDIO PRODUCTION


    An introductory course in the theory and operation of audio equipment and the creation of various audio presentations. Students write, produce, and perform in a series of individual and group projects.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3271 - QUEER TV


    Television has had a long history in regard to glbt (gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered) images.  These images and lack of them have had an impact on how society views these minority sexualities/genders.  Working from the theoretical perspectives of social learning, cultivation and queer theories this coursed explores how television has portrayed glbt groups since its inception in the early 1940’s and the impact these images have had on society from the creation of media advocacy groups to increased acceptance of these minority groups.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3272 - FILM and SOCIETY


    This is a course on film and its impact on social diversity.  Aside from viewing a series of classic and well-known films, students will learn about film language and its proper usage, a film’s impact on our society, economy and politics and how all of this relates to the history of film.  Through lectures, online discussions and viewing films, students explore various cultures, gender inequality, social dilemmas and the historical impacts within film since 1895.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 30 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3273 - MASS MEDIA AND SOCIETY


    Media is an integral part of society by not only reflecting society but sometimes leading it.  As media continues to evolve through different delivery methods, industry consolidation, and segmentation of the market, its pervasive impact is felt daily.  This course explores the interrelationship of media and society and the impact media is having on society as well as society on media through a study of current media controversies and personal media use.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3274 - GAY and LESBIAN FILM IMAGES


    Through lecture, film viewing and critiques, this course explores the development and evolution of gay and lesbian images in films from the pre-code silent film days to the present and the cultural context in which they were created. 

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3300 - DIGITAL COMMUNICATION IN PUBLIC RELATIONS


    This course is designed to explore digital communication used in field of public relations. The strategies used in this form of communication will be addressed through the study and application of emerging technologies.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2210

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    COM 3301 - INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION


    Introductory study of the theoretical and practical aspects of television studio production.  Topics include studio cameras, scripting, interviewing, lighting, sound and post-production editing.  Students will work in groups on assignments and projects for further exposure with the equipment.  Active participation in Mountaineer News will be required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2208 or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3303 - TELEVISION AND RADIO ANNOUNCING


    This course will examine the use and development of the human voice as a tool to inform and persuade.  The course offers in-depth training in effective communication in a variety of settings employed by the electronic media.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3304 - ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION


    Advanced study of the theoretical and practical aspects of television field production.  Students will be exposed to video field cameras, advanced editing techniques, directing and producing elements to complete an individual or group project by semester’s end.  Active participation in Mountaineer news will be required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2208 and COM 3301 or professor permission.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3306 - NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION


    This course covers the importance of nonverbal messages in communication. Attention is given to facial expression, body movement and posture, symbols and other forms of nonverbal expression. Students taking this course will (1) better understand the nonverbal communication they project, (2) learn how to interpret the nonverbals of others around them, (3) recognize the intercultural differences in nonverbal communication, (4) be better able to communicate nonverbally in today’s global society, and (5) be able to understand the implications of communicating without nonverbals when using specific communication channels such as email.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 1101, COM 1102 or COM 1103

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3309 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN MASS MEDIA


    This changing topic course will introduce students to various aspects of Mass Communication study of interest to the profession. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: 45 earned credits. 

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3310 - ELECTRONIC MEDIA SALES AND MANAGEMENT


    This course presents current practices, problems and issues of electronic media sales and management. Lectures, readings and class presentations provide an introduction to the business aspects of electronic media.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2201 and 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3311 - ELECTRONIC MEDIA PROGRAMMING


    A comprehensive examination of the programming strategies employed in the electronic media industries with an emphasis on radio and television. Special emphasis is placed on program acquisition, scheduling, financing, and the role of first-run and off-network television syndication in addition to satellite cable systems and new electronic media outlets. Lectures, readings and class discussion provide an introduction to the programming aspects of electronic media.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2201 and COM 2208.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3320 - PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING


    This course will familiarize the student with various forms of public relations writing and enhance their skills in written communication.  Students will produce public relations material for both traditional and digital media outlets.  Emphasis is placed on message design, strategy, audience analysis, and communication channels.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2210.

    Credits: 3 cr.
 

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