Nov 28, 2022  
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    RTH 1112 - ARTERIAL BLOOD GASES


    This course covers the sampling and analysis of arterial blood and the interpretation of test results. Majors only.

    Prerequisites & Notes: BSC 1121, BSC 1122 and MA-1128 with a grade of at least “C” and a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.

    Co-Requisite:  RTH 1101

    Credits: 1 cr.

  
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    RTH 2204 - RESPIRATORY CARE PHARMACOLOGY


    Examines the action and uses of pharmacologic agents. Emphasis is on drugs used in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac and pulmonary disease, and includes the calculation of dosages and solutions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: RTH 1102 with a grade of at least  “C”.

    Credits: 2 cr.
  
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    RTH 2205 - RESPIRATORY DISEASE


    This course provides the respiratory therapy student with the pulmonary disease knowledge base necessary to implement therapist-driven protocols and provide appropriate care to patients.  Topics include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, restrictive pulmonary disorders, infectious pulmonary disease, pulmonary vascular disease, and pulmonary pathology associated with trauma.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTH 1101, RTH 1102 and RTH 1112 with a grade of at least “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH 1111 & RTH 2211

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    RTH 2208 - PERINATAL/PEDIATRIC RESPIRATORY CARE


    Examines respiratory physiology and pathophysiology relevant to the newborn and pediatric patient. The principles, techniques, and equipment relied upon in providing respiratory care to this age group are identified and demonstrated.

    Prerequisites & Notes: RTH 1111, RTH 2204, RTH 2205 and RTH 2211 with a grade of at least “C” in each.

    Credits: 2 cr.
  
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    RTH 2211 - MECHANICAL VENTILATION


    Classroom instruction and laboratory practice in the management of patients requiring continuous mechanical support of ventilation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: RTH 1101, RTH 1102 & RTH 1112 with a grade of at least “C” in each.

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
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    RTH 2212 - ADVANCED CARDIOPULMONARY CARE


    Examines cardiovascular problems, advanced cardiopulmonary monitoring techniques, special procedures, pulmonary rehabilitation, and home care.

    Prerequisites & Notes: RTH 1111, RTH 2204, RTH 2205 and RTH 2211 with a grade of at least “C” in each.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    RTH 2221 - CLINICAL PRACTICUM I


    An introduction to fundamental assessment and therapeutic procedures provided to patients in the hospital setting.  Each student will have a weekly half-day rotation to the clinical site for observation and hands-on experience treating patients in the critical and non-critical care areas of the hospital. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: BSC 1121 and BSC 1122 with a grade of at least “C” in each , a grade point average of at least 2.5 and current healthcare provider BLS certification.

    Co-requisites: RTH 1101, RTH 1102 and RTH 1112.

    Credits: 1 cr.

  
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    RTH 2222 - CLINICAL PRACTICUM II


    The student will practice the administration of fundamental respiratory care procedures to patients in the hospital under the supervision of experienced respiratory therapists. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: RTH 1101, RTH 1102, RTH 1112, and RTH 2221 with a grade of at least “C” in each and health care provider BLS certification.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    RTH 2223 - CLINICAL PRACTICUM III


    The student will demonstrate competence in the administration of fundamental respiratory care procedures and begin practicing more advanced respiratory care procedures in the critical care units and diagnostic laboratories. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: RTH 1111, RTH 2204, RTH 2205, RTH 2211, and RTH 2222 with a grade of at least “C” in each and health care provider BLS certification.

    Credits: 5 cr.
  
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    RTH 2224 - CLINICAL PRACTICUM IV


    The student will demonstrate competence in the administration of advanced respiratory care procedures in the critical care units and diagnostic laboratories.  Rotations to specialty care facilities are included. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: RTH 2208, RTH 2212, and RTH 2223 with a grade of at least “C” in each and health care provider BLS Certification.

    Credits: 6 cr.
  
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    RTH 3110 - PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTING


    This course covers lung function in health and disease. Techniques used to measure lung function are discussed and demonstrated. The student is instructed in the interpretation of pulmonary function tests.

    Prerequisites & Notes:  Prerequisites:BSC-1121 BSC-1122 BSC-3271 CHM-1101 & MA-1128 with a grade of at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3303, RTH-3301, RTH-3312 & RTH-3121.

    Credits: 2cr

  
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    RTH 3112 - ARTERIAL BLOOD GASES


    This course covers the sampling and analysis of arterial blood and the interpretation of test results.

    Prerequisites & Notes:  Prerequisites: BSC-1121 BSC-1122 BSC-3271 CHM-1101 & MA-1128 with a grade of at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3303, RTH-3301, RTH-3110 & RTH-3121.

    Credits: 2cr

  
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    RTH 3121 - CLINICAL PRACTICUM I


    The student will demonstrate continuing competence in the administration of fundamental respiratory care procedures and practice respiratory care procedures in the critical care units and diagnostic laboratories. The student will consistently develop knowledge and ability to perform more advanced skills needed to care for patients in the assigned clinical setting. The student will develop personal behaviors consistent with professional expectations of the registered respiratory therapist.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes:  Prerequisites: BSC-1121, BSC-1122, BSC-3271, CHM-1101 & MA-1128 with a grade of at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3301, RTH-3303, RTH-3112, RTH-3110.

    Credits: 1cr

  
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    RTH 3204 - RESPIRATORY CARE PHARMACOLOGY


    This course examines the action and uses of pharmacologic agents. Emphasis is on drugs used in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac and pulmonary disease and included the calculation of dosages and solutions.

    Prerequisites & Notes:  Prerequisites: RTH-3301 RTH-3303 RTH-3112 RTH-3121 RTH-3110 with a grade of at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3205, RTH-3211, RTH-3210 & RTH-3222.

    Credits: 2cr

  
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    RTH 3205 - RESPIRATORY DISEASE I


    This course provides the respiratory therapy student with knowledge of pulmonary diseases necessary to implement therapist-driven protocols and provide appropriate care to patients. Topics include Respiratory Assessment and Failure, acute and chronic obstructive, acute and chronic infectious respiratory disease, neuromuscular disease, interstitial lung disease and sleep disordered breathing conditions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites:RTH-3301 RTH-3303 RTH-3112 RTH-3121 RTH-3110 with a grade of at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3204, RTH-3211, RTH-3222 & RTH-3210.

    Credits: 3cr.

  
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    RTH 3210 - RESPIRATORY CARE IN ALTERNATIVE SITES


    This course examines alternative areas that respiratory care is practiced outside of acute hospital setting. At the end of this course, the students will understand their role as respiratory therapists in the homecare, subacute care, pulmonary rehabilitation, sleep lab and long-term ventilator hospital. This course provides a pulmonary rehabilitation, home care respiratory therapy and respiratory therapist’s role in disease management.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTH-3303 and RTH-3110 with a ggrade of at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3205, RTH-3204, RTH-3222 & RTH-3211.

    Credits: 2cr

  
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    RTH 3211 - MECHANICAL VENTILATION I


    The mechanics of ventilation and breath delivery is presented along with an introduction of ventilators. Discussion includes the mechanics of ventilator modes classification, the control interrelations, the electro-pneumatic/microprocessor systems and the audiovisual alarm systems, a selection of current ventilator models are presented during lab and provide hands on experience in troubleshooting, setup, control function, alarm setting and mode changes.  A selection of current ventilator models is presented using labs to provide hands-on experience in troubleshooting, setup, control function, alarm setting and mode change.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTH-3301 RTH-3303 RTH-3112 with a grade of at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3205, RTH-3204, RTH-3222 & RTH-3210.

    Credits: 4cr

  
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    RTH 3222 - CLINICAL PRACTICUM II


    This semester’s clinical experience is intended primarily to allow the student to become proficient in the administration of common respiratory therapy modalities to patients. Floor therapy and intensive care rotations allow the student to establish competence in providing oxygen and aerosol (including medications) therapies, lung expansion and airway clearance techniques. Students will practice manual ventilation and basic care of the artificial airway in the ICU and PACU settings. Students will rotate through the arterial blood gas and pulmonary function laboratories learning to procure blood samples and conducting pulmonary function tests. A rotation to the Non-Invasive Cardiology lab will allow the students to gain experience in performing electrocardiograms and observing serval non-invasive cardiac procedures. Learners will have an observational rotation in the operating room at Robert Packer Hospital under guidance of staff anesthesia personnel.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTH-3301, RTH-3303, RTH-3112,  with a grade of at least a “C” in each and health care provider BLS certification.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3202, RTH-3204, RTH-3211 & RTH-3210.

     

    Credits: 3cr

  
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    RTH 3301 - FUNDAMENTALS OF RESPIRATORY CARE I


    An examination of respiratory system anatomy and physiology, medical gas physics, chest radiology, and the principles of electrocardiography.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: BSC-1121, BSC-1122, BSC-3271, CHM-1101 & MA-1128 with a grade of at least “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3303, RTH-3112, RTH-3110 & RTH 3121.

    Credits: 3cr.

  
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    RTH 3303 - FUNDAMENTALS OF RESPIRATORY CARE II


    Classroom instruction and laboratory practice of fundamental respiratory care assessment and therapeutic procedures. Topics include physical examination of the patient, bedside pulmonary function tests medical gas therapy, aerosol therapy, airway pharmacology, lung expansion therapy, airway clearance therapy, airway management, and infection control.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: BSC-1121, BSC-1122, BSC 3271, CHM-1101 & MA-1128 with a grade of at least “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-3301, RTH-3112, RTH-3110 & RTH-3121.

    Credits: 4cr

  
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    RTH 3506 - RESPIRATORY DISEASE II


    This course provides the respiratory therapy student with additional knowledge of pulmonary diseases necessary to implement therapist-driven protocols and provide appropriate care to patients. Topics include Acute conditions such as Hemodynamic emergencies and Shock, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Heart Failure and Pulmonary Vascular Conditions, Interstitial lung disease, infections in the immunocompromised patient, Lung Cancer and pulmonary compromise associated with specific lung injuries (trauma, near drowning, smoke inhalation and burns).

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: 3205 with a grade of at least a ”C”.

    Co-Requisite: RTH-3523.

    Credits: 2cr

  
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    RTH 3523 - CLINICAL PRACTICUM III


    The primary focus of the RTH 3523 Clinical Practicum III course is the assessment, development and implementation of a respiratory care plan for the stable and critically ill patients. Clinical time will be devoted to care of adult patients requiring ventilatory support (both acute and long term) and each student will be returning to the arterial blood gas laboratory, pulmonary function laboratory, and operating room. Students will also participate in rotations through the specialty areas of home care, pulmonary rehabilitation and sleep disorders to gain knowledge and understanding of these aspects of respiratory care.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTH-3110, RTH-3204, RTH-3205, RTH-3211 & RTH-3222 with a grade of at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisite: RTH-3506.

    Credits: 4cr

  
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    RTH 4108 - PERINATAL/PEDIATRIC RESPIRATORY CARE


    Students will learn the pathology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of the cardiopulmonary diseases unique to the newborn and pediatric patient population. There will be discussion of the development of the fetus, high-risk pregnancies and the rolls of respiratory therapists in labor and delivery. This course is intended to prepare the student for hands-on clinical rotation to the neonatal and pediatric intensive care units and introduce the student to this area of specialization.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTH-3110, RTH-3204, RTH-3205 & RTH-3211 with at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-4111, RTH-4112 & RTH-4124.

     

    Credits: 3cr

  
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    RTH 4111 - MECHANICAL VENTILATION II


    The mechanics of ventilation and breath delivery is presented along with an introduction of ventilators. Discussion includes the mechanics of ventilator modes classification, the control interrelations, the electro-pneumatic/microprocessor system and the audiovisual alarm systems, a selection of current ventilator models are presented during lab and provide hands on experience in troubleshooting, setup, control function, alarm setting and mode changes. A selection of current ventilator models is presented using  labs to provide hands-on experience in troubleshooting, setup, control function, alarm setting and mode change.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: RTH-3211 with at least a “C” grade.

    Co-requisites: RTh-4108, RTH-4112 & RTH-4124.

    Credits: 3cr

  
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    RTH 4112 - ADVANCED CARDIOPULMONARY CARE


    A discussion of the care of patients with cardiovascular problems. Hemodynamics of critically ill patients is emphasized and discussion of how ventilator management affects hemodynamic status.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTH-3110, RTH-3204, RTH-3205 & RTH-3211 with at least a grade of “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-4111, RTH-4108 & RTH-4124.

    Credits: 3cr

  
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    RTH 4124 - CLINICAL PRACTICUM IV


    Application of respiratory care to the patient in critical and long-term ventilator unit. The student will demonstrate competence in the arterial blood gas and pulmonary function labs and continue practicing endotracheal intubation and assisting the physician with bronchoscopy. Students will complete a course in Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) and east the American Heart Association certification in ACLS.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: RTH-3523 with a grade of at least a “C”.

    Co-requisites: RTH-4108, RTH-4111 & RTH 4112.

    Credits: 5cr

  
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    RTH 4216 - RESPIRATORY CARE LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT


    This course provides a discussion of current practices/trends of techniques used in the leadership of the health care environment. Emphasis will be placed upon specific skill sets used by managers of today’s workforce.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTH-4112 & RTH-4124 with a grade of at least a “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-4224 & RTH-4225.

    Credits: 3cr

  
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    RTH 4224 - RESPIRATORY THERAPY SEMINAR


    This is an advanced course that includes a comprehensive review of respiratory care research. A discussion of the methods of scientific research including an overview of the research process, components of a research paper, developing research questions, framing a hypothesis, performing a literature search and review, and designing a research proposal.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTH-4112 & RTH-4124 with at least a grade of “C” in each.

    Co-requisites: RTH-4216 & RTH-4225.

    Credits: 3cr

  
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    RTH 4225 - CLINICAL PRACTICUM V


    This final clinical course provides the student with many opportunities to integrate didactic knowledge and psychomotor skills in preparation for the respiratory therapy national board (NBRC) exams as well as future employment. The student continues to practice and demonstrate competence in several areas including care of the critically ill patient, floor therapy, endotracheal intubation, arterial blood gas and pulmonary function labs and assisting the physician with bronchoscopy. Specialty rotations are included to the neonatal intensive care unit, pediatric intensive care unit and physician rounds.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: RTh-4124, RTH-4108, RTH-4111 & RTH-4412 with a grade of at least a “C” in each and health care provider BLS and ACLS certification.

    Co-requisites: RTH-4216 & RTH-4224. 

    Credits: 5cr

  
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    RUS 1101 - INTRODUCTORY RUSSIAN I


    Oral alphabet drill, written alphabet drill, study of specific letters and sounds, pronunciation and orthography, personal pronouns, present tense, first conjugation verbs, accusative of personal pronoun questions, indirect questions and negation, present tense, second conjugation verbs, reflexive verbs, gender of nouns, accusative of nouns (direct objects), verbs of going, months and years with numbers, prepositional case of nouns, possessive pronouns/adjectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: proven foreign language ability.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    RUS 1102 - INTRODUCTORY RUSSIAN II


    Dative case of pronouns, double negatives, conjunctions. Noun plurals, stress shift in plurals, geographical information, expressions with dative, demonstrative pronouns, adjectives, superlative degree, past tense, future tense, accusative of adjectives/possessive pronouns, relative pronouns, partitive genitive, instrumental case with prepositions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: RUS 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    RUS 2201 - INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I


    The perfective and imperfective aspect of verbs, dates and the negative case, dative case of nouns, adjectives and pronouns, instrumental case without prepositions, relative pronouns, partitive genitive, passive voice, instrumental case with prepositions, masculine nouns with stressed endings, genitive plural, adjectives modified by numbers, dative, instrumental and prepositional plural, indefinite pronouns, adjectives and adverbs, comparative degree of adjectives and adverbs, reading of simple texts.

    Prerequisites & Notes: RUS 1101 and RUS 1102 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    RUS 3370 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    Open to students who wish to study abroad. Plans for foreign study should be presented at least one semester prior to departure. Number of credits granted will be based upon validated credentials presented to the department. The student should register for RUS 3370 - RUS 3380 prior to departure. Students should consult the regulations for study-abroad available in the Office of the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    RUS 3371 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See RUS 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    RUS 3372 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See RUS 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    RUS 3373 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See RUS 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    RUS 3374 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See RUS 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    RUS 3375 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See RUS 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    SCI 1104 - FORENSIC SCIENCE


    Forensic science is the application of science to law. this course will study the collection and identification of materials used as evidence. This will include an understanding of their physical and chemical nature and origins at the crime scene. Further, the student will utilize the collected evidence to suggest scenarios for crime scenes.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SCI 1107 - PHYSICAL SCIENCE I


    An introduction to astronomy, forces and motion, and energy. Students will often construct laboratory apparatus from readily available sources to make physical measurements. This general education course is particularly suitable for elementary education majors.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SCI 1108 - PHYSICAL SCIENCE II


    An introduction to the atom, chemistry, electricity and magnetism, sound, and light. Students will often construct laboratory apparatus from readily available sources to make physical measurements. This general education course is particularly suitable for elementary education majors.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SCI 1125 - THE SCIENCE OF MUSIC


    Provides scientific explanations for the physical basis of sound and music. Topics will include: what comprises music versus noise, the biological interpretation of music, how sounds are made with different instruments, and digital aspects of modern music production and engineering. Explanation will require an introduction to Newton’s laws of motion, wave mechanics and acoustics, and some basic concepts of electricity and circuits. Students will explore these ideas hands on in the lab portion of the course.

    General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge - Natural and Physical Sciences
  
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    SCI 2264 - COURTROOM PROCEEDINGS AND TESTIMONY


    This course provides the student of forensic science a practical look inside the courtroom and the expectations of an expert witness. Some topics to be covered during this course include: the role of each player in a courtroom proceeding; the procedures involved in the direct and cross examination of experts; the types of expert testimony; the expectations of dress, demeanor and delivery when providing expert testimony; and the importance of ethical behavior when providing expert testimony.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take: SCI 1104 or CJA 1100.

    Credits: 1cr.
  
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    SCI 3270 - NANOTECH LAB EXPERIENCE


    An intensive nanotechnology laboratory experience. Topics covered include: material safety and equipment; basic nanotechnology processes; thin film deposition; lithography; materials modification; and device characterization, packaging, and testing.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of Nanotechnology Coordinator required.

    Credits: 18 cr.
  
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    SCI 4400 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION


    This is a course for one to three credits for practicing teachers and for graduate and undergraduate students who are enrolled in education programs. The course may focus on one or more physical science topics, but content, activities, and methods will be treated with equal importance for a variety of classroom settings. The information, ideas, and activities obtained will be timely and useful to teachers in their classrooms.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    SFM 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY


    An introduction to the basic principles and implementation of Environmental Health and Safety in industrial and other types of organizations. Required as a first course for students enrolled in the Environmental Health and Safety major.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    SFM 1800 - JOB SITE SAFETY


    This course will cover basic safety procedures and OSHA regulations pertaining to common work sites, including well pads.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: GEG-1800
  
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    SFM 2002 - REGULATION OF INDUSTRAIL HEALTH AND SAFETY


    An overview of the regulation of industrial health and safety. Students will gain an understanding of industrial and occupational health and safety, safety legislation and regulation, ergonomics and safety management, fire prevention and protection, safety systems, and various resources for ensuring the health and safety of an industrial workforce. Special attention will be given to the safety needs of the gas production and service industry.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SFM-1101

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SFM 3000 - REGULATION OF INDUSTRIAL HEALTH AND SAFETY


    This course builds on concepts covered in SFM 1101 Introduction to Environmental Health and Safety. Specific standards and regulations, including those contained in 29CFR1910, will be covered. Additional topics include an overview of the legal and ethical dimensions of safety management as well using trend analysis to reduce workplace hazards.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take SFM-1101.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    SFM 3001 - SAFETY PROGRAM MANAGEMENT


    An overview of strategies for developing and managing safety programs. Students will gain an understanding of the elements of effective cultures of safety and design a basic safety education program for a simulated workplace need.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SFM-1101

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SFM 3002 - CRITICAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT


    A comprehensive overview of critical incident management. Students will gain an understanding of best practices for managing critical incidents that may put lives, property, or the environment at risk. Simulations of critical incidents will be used to ensure students learn relevant skills.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SFM-1101

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SFM 3003 - HUMAN FACTORS IN SAFETY


    An overview of human factors in safety management and accident prevention. Students will review theories of human factors in safety and learn through case analysis ways to reduce the probability of accidents by more effectively recognizing risks and managing human behaviors at the worksite.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SFM-1101

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SFM 3020 - PRACTICUM


    An out-of-class learning experience that allows students to observe or participate in applied work. May be taken for 1-5 credits and repeated for a total of 5 credits. Practicums are grades S and U-they do not affect your QPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 earned credits and permission of instructor.

    Variable Credits: 1-5cr
  
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    SFM 3100 - FIRE SAFETY


    Fire Safety provides an overview of fire prevention; fire behavior and fire suppression systems. Topics include the chemistry of fire; the Life Safety Code and other related safety codes; fire prevention methods and measures; types, and functions and features of some of the most common fixed and portable extinguishing systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take SFM-1101

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    SFM 3200 - INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE


    The course concentrates on concepts, terminology, and methodology in the practice of industrial hygiene. Sampling techniques for various contaminants, air and noise pollution, in particular are also covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take SFM 1101, MA 1135.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    SFM 4495 - INTERNSHIP


    An out-of-class learning experience that allows students to observe or participate in applied work. May be taken for 6-12 credits and repeated for a total of 12 credits. Internships are grades S or U-they do not affect your QPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 earned credits and permission of instructor.

    Variable Credits: 6-12cr.
  
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    SOC 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY


    Introduction to the basic concepts, premises, and techniques involved in the scientific approach to the study of human societies. Analysis is made of selected aspects of social behavior at interpersonal, intergroup, and societal levels. Global perspectives are explored.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 1121 - CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS


    A survey of the major problems in contemporary society with special attention to the major paradigms (conflict, functionalist, interactionist) that are used to interpret the formation of social policy and social movement. Special focus is on social and economic justice and populations at risk globally and locally.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 2200 - RACISM IN AMERICA


    This course examines the diversity of race and ethnicity in the U.S. Race is one of the most critical, divisive, and defining issues in the United States today.  Using a sociological approach, this course treats race and ethnicity as social constructs that permeate social life, are entrenched in social structures and institutions, and change over time and place. The course examines how the construct of race develops in relationship to other systems of social differentiation, including class and gender. We will consider how these coexisting social hierarchies shape identities, determine life chances, establish relationships of marginality and privilege, and generate social stability and conflict.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 2203 - TELEPHONE SURVEY RESEARCH


    Provides training in applied social research. Students are directly involved in constructing an interview schedule, selecting a sample, conducting telephone interviews, coding and analyzing data, and writing a report.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SOC 1101, PSY 1101 or ANH 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 2232 - AMERICAN FAMILY SYSTEMS


    An examination of the diversity of marriage and family life in American society as reflected in changing social conditions and social policies. Focus is given to social and economic justice and populations at risk, including the identification and function of values, norms, and codes relevant to marriage and family decision making.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 2260 - SOCIAL STRATIFICATION


    This general education course provides an introduction to the study of social stratification in the United States of America and around the world. Students will investigate the dimensions of inequality among social positions analyze the means by which individuals, groups and countries attain unequal rank, and critique theories of this intersection of class, race, gender and country. Explores the problems associated with theorizing about and measuring social class.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 3280 - SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR


    Explores sociological theories and research on deviant behavior. Emphasis is on understanding the social construction of what is considered deviance in society, the social patterns behind deviant behavior within society, and how deviance is a necessary part of society. Major and minor forms of deviant behavior will be explored using these perspectives.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 3301 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR


    Overview of the major concepts, theories, and research findings in the field of organizational behavior. Examines the sociological analysis of organizations in modern society, the social dimensions of high performance organizations, and how to direct and lead individuals, groups and organizations.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 3305 - SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION


    Analysis of the interrelationships between religion and other aspects of society, particularly with reference to the problems of order and change.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 3307 - SOCIAL RESEARCH I: RESEARCH DESIGN DATA COLLECTION


    Examines the basic relationship of research with social theory, the challenges of defining a problem for study, the selection of an appropriate sample, and the challenges faced in using various techniques to collect data from a sample. Careful consideration is given to the ethical issues that arise in the conduct of research.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 3308 - SOCIAL RESEARCH II: ANALYSIS, INTERPRETATION, AND APPLICATIONS


    Covers how social scientists handle quantitative data. Reviews the scientific method, causality, the types of variables encountered in social research, and how data informs social theory. The focus is on learning basic techniques for describing social science data and testing for relationships between variables. Includes training in statistical software package and student-driven applied research projects; thus previous training in statistics strongly recommended.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 3310 - SOCIOLOGY OF SEX AND GENDER


    This course introduces major sociological concepts, theories, and perspectives about gender and sex. The main purpose of this course is to explore how society and culture work together to shape our lives and our gender identities.  The course will explore the relationship between gender and major social institutions, such as family and economy.  This will examine how culture, economy, and education, maintain, reproduce, and change gender roles within the United States and across the world. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 24 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    SOC 3320 - SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION


    Globalization is profoundly remaking social structure and transforming the lives of people in every corner of the planet.  The objective of this course is to survey the distinct themes sub-areas that make up the sociology of globalization.  These include: theories of globalization; the global economy; political globalization; globalization and culture; transnational civil society/transnational social movements; globalization and gender/race/ethnicity; and transnational migration, etc.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 3322 - SOCIOLOGY OF AGING


    Analyzes the influence of social interaction upon the process, stages, and problems of aging, particularly of older age. Student-conducted oral history is utilized not only as a catalyst for intergenerational understanding and respect, but also as a therapeutic social work technique designed to enhance the self-image of older people by having them look back over their personal histories and through that process help them to meet the human need to attain a self-appreciation of the validity and significance of their lives.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: SOC 5522.
  
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    SOC 3336 - POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY


    Covers the intersection of sociology and politics. Investigates the development of policy issues, people’s reactions and responses to them, and resolution of the issues in the public arena. Focuses on the dynamics of power and influence in the social relations: who has power, who does not, and why.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    SOC 3342 - ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY


    Environmental sociology explores how the environment, society, politics, economics, technology and the individual intersect. Key contemporary environmental debates are investigated. Topics covered include the environmental movement, the sustainable development debate, capitalism and technology, global warming, environmental justice and the ecological society. Theory and empirical studies inform the exploration.

    Credits: 3 cr
  
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    SOC 3350 - SELECTED TOPICS SEMINAR


    Review of a specialty area in anthropology, sociology or the study of a problem from an interdisciplinary position.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Upper division standing and permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 - 6 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 6 credits.
  
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    SOC 3357 - SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION


    This course is designed to introduce students to the major sociological theories and research in the area of education. Students will examine the history and structure of education in the U.S. and how the U.S. compares with other countries. Understanding who makes it and who doesn’t in the U.S. education system and why, is the major focus of the course.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    SOC 3360 - SOCIOLOGY OF MEDICINE


    This course includes the sociological study of physical health and illness, therapy, rehabilitation, and the organization of health care systems in the United States. It examines help-seeking behaviors, utilization of health care services, issues of bioethics, and the roles of health care service providers all from the sociological perspective. Race, class, and gender stratification within the health care system will also be explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 3365 - DISABILITY AND SOCIETY


    This course examines the influence of societal structure in the socialization of persons with disabilities.  It examines various perspectives to view disability.  Students also learn the complexity and diversity of sociological issues surrounding disability, including those arising from the family, parenting, school, workplace and society, as well as social movements related to disability and other socialization issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes:

    Must have 30 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    SOC 3370 - SOCIOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD


    This course explores the nature of childhood and the development and socialization of children from infancy through adolescence.  Through course readings, assignments, and discussions, the course will cover the agencies and social forces that shape children.  This course will incorporate the perspective, which rather than assuming that children are passive participants starts from the assumption that children are active participants who both shape and are shaped by their social world.  The course will also address the future of childhood which might be especially beneficial to current or future policy makers.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 3388 - SOCIOLOGY OF CHINA


    Sociology of China surveys sociological concepts as they are applied by sociologists who study China. Research and writing on Chinese society from the core substantive areas within sociology will be covered including culture, theory, family, social interaction, social stratification, education, social movements, the environment, the economy and so on. Students will develop an understanding of present day China and how it has been evolving.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 24 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    SOC 3395 - SOCIOLOGY OF WORK


    This course provides a critical introduction to work and occupations in American society. It uses theory, empirical data, and research findings to explore how work is shaped by the structure of society. Students engage in fundamental sociological analysis of work and its history, organization, culture, inequalities, diversity, on-the-job characteristics, connections to power, and intersection with other spheres of social life.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 24 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    SOC 3415 - AMERICAN VALUES IN CONFLICT


    Analyzes American values and values conflicts from a sociological perspective, placing such values and conflicts within a context of ideological orientation, ethnic/racial and social class diversity, group interaction, socio-cultural change, and societal policy.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    SOC 4441 - ORGANIZATIONAL INTERNSHIP


    Provides experience in the regular activities of a business, government agency, or social service organization. Students will prepare an analysis of the organization’s role system and its real or potential area of stress.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor; SOC 3301 strongly recommended.

    Credits: 6 - 15 cr.
  
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    SOC 4449 - PRACTICUM


    This course is designed to provide an applied experience working in an agency or organization. Students will develop an understanding of organization’s position in the community.  The student should become aware of the agency/organization’s social interaction patterns, the organization’s mission and role, and its strengths and weaknesses.  Students are expected to help the organization reach its goals through the application of sociological concepts and training.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 4480 - SOCIAL SCIENCE THEORY


    Course examines classical theorists who have contributed to the development of sociology and anthropology.  Students review the historical, societal and intellectual situation surrounding the classical theorists, the linkages between their work, their backgrounds, and the major contributions that they have provided.  The role of theory in the process of conducting social science research is illuminated.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 12 semester hours of Sociology courses or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 4495 - SENIOR SEMINAR


    This course provides Sociology and Anthropology majors an opportunity to integrate their learning experiences.  Two aspects of these learning experiences will be demonstrated through 1) career-oriented learning applications and 2) academic learning applications.  Students will create a portfolio and a capstone paper and do a professional presentation in the chosen focus area.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 60 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SOC 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
  •  

    SPA 1101 - INTRODUCTORY SPANISH I


    For students who have not previously studied Spanish. Fundamentals of grammar, intensive drill in pronunciation, comprehension, and speaking. Two hours language laboratory required weekly.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPA 1102 - INTRODUCTORY SPANISH II


    Continuation of SPA 1101, two hour language laboratory weekly.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 1101 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPA 1111 - SPANISH FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES: HEALTHCARE I


    Spanish for Special Purposes: Healthcare I is a beginning level Spanish course designed to help students develop basic language skills within the context of the health field. It constitutes the first of a four course sequence that approaches language learning through intercultural literacy. This course emphasizes the use of Spanish in realistic and practical situations within the medical environment, while underscoring the cultural richness and diversity of the Latin American and Caribbean patient’s background.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    SPA 1112 - SPANISH FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES: HEALTHCARE II


    Spanish for Special Purposes: Healthcare II is the second beginning level Spanish course designed to help students develop basic language skills within the context of the health field. It constitutes the second part of a four course sequence that approaches language learning through intercultural literacy. This course emphasizes the use of Spanish in realistic and practical situations within the medical environment, while underscoring the cultural richness and diversity of the Latin American and Caribbean patient’s background.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 1101 or SPA 1111 and instructor’s permission.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    SPA 2201 - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I


    Continuation of SPA 1102, grammar review.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 1102 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    SPA 2202 - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II


    Continuation of SPA 2201.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2201 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    SPA 2205 - PHONETICS AND PRONUNCIATION


    A study of the speech organs, place and manner of articulation of Spanish phonemes and their phonetic realizations, along with extensive practice exercise on pronunciation, intonation, stress and sentence rhythm. The numerous changes occurring in connected and rapid speech will be studied as well. Students will also be introduced to some Spanish dialects and regional pronunciation patterns.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 1102 or equivalent; SPA 2201 or higher is preferred.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    SPA 2213 - SPANISH FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES: HEALTHCARE III


    Spanish for Special Purposes: Healthcare III is the first intermediate level Spanish course in the Spanish healthcare sequence designed to help students develop language skills within the context of this field. It constitutes the third part of this four course sequence that approaches language learning through intercultural literacy. This course emphasizes the use of Spanish in realistic and practical situations within the medical environment, while underscoring the cultural richness and diversity of the Latin American and Caribbean patient’s background.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 1102 or SPA 1112 and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    SPA 2214 - SPANISH FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES: HEALTHCARE IV


    Spanish for Special Purposes: Healthcare IV is the second intermediate level Spanish course in the Spanish healthcare sequence designed to help students develop language skills within the context of this field. It constitutes the last part of this four course sequence that approaches language learning through intercultural literacy. This course emphasizes the use of Spanish in realistic and practical situations within the medical environment, while underscoring the cultural richness and diversity of the Latin American and Caribbean patient’s background.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2201 or SPA 2213 and instructor permission.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    SPA 2225 - SPANISH GRAMMAR REVIEW


    SPA 2224 is a transition course between the intermediate and advanced level Spanish courses. It provides intensive Spanish grammar review and practice. It emphasizes the foundations of grammar and their expression in conversation, writing, and reading. In this course, students will increase their grammatical competency and command, as well as, work towards developing a more complex grammatical expression.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2201, SPA 2202 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    SPA 3300 - SPANISH CONVERSATION


    Practice in oral self-expression and comprehension. Selected topics assigned for each class.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPA 3301 - CONVERSATION AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES


    SPA 3301 is an upper level conversation course designed to move students from intermediate to advanced level oral proficiency. All class activities will focus on contemporary Hispanic issues and will consist of individual/group presentations, debate, and discussion.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2201, SPA 2202 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPA 3306 - THE CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION OF SPAIN


    Examines the history of customs and institutions of Spain. Emphasizes the effect of history on general culture and customs of present-day Spain.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    SPA 3307 - THE CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION OF LATIN AMERICA


    Studies the history, customs and politics of Latin America. Emphasizes general characteristics: race, religion, life style, etc.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SPA 3310 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES


    SPA 3310 in an introductory course in literary studies. In this course, students will read a diverse but representative collection of short Peninsular and Latin American literary texts, concentrating on their form, creation, context, and meaning. As a result, students will develop better reading, critical thinking, and evaluative skills.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or permission of instructor.

    Co-requisite - SPA 2225

    Credits: 3 cr.

 

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