Oct 04, 2022  
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    COM 3322 - CASE STUDIES IN PUBLIC RELATIONS


    This course provides advanced study of public relations through the examination of public relations cases.  Students will be exposed to issues, challenges, and opportunities within public relations practice and further develop their skills in these areas. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2210.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3325 - INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION


    Interpersonal communication explores the dynamics of communication transactions between individuals in impersonal, personal, and professional relationships.  This course will focus on the practical application of communication skills to one’s own communication experience and relationships as well as an understanding of a myriad of concepts and principles necessary in successful relationships.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3330 - EFFECTIVE MEETING MANAGEMENT


    Focuses on all aspects of effective meeting management in a variety of settings. Topics include agenda setting, group dynamics, parliamentary procedure, and effective meeting strategies. Students will facilitate, lead, and participate in various meetings as well as analyze effective and ineffective meeting dynamics.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3331 - MEDIA ETHICS


    This course focuses on the conduct of the mass media practitioner and the impact of ethical decision-making on the mass media industry and on society in general.  Contemporary problems and issues in media ethics will be examined using case study methods.  This course will specifically explore ethical decision-making in the areas of invasion of privacy, truth telling, conflicts of interest, revealing sources, social responsibility, offensive and violent content, media content and juveniles, and stereotyping.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3332 - INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION


    Intercultural Communication examines theory and practice related to communicating across cultures and communicating between members of different cultural groups. This course will focus on improving communication competence with intercultural communication, developing relationships with members of other cultures, and developing an understanding of the global differences among cultures.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3334 - GENDER AND COMMUNICATION


    This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of gender and how those concepts relate to communication. The course introduces students to important gender communication concepts such as gendered verbal and non-verbal communications, the social shaping of gender, gendered power and violence, sexual harassment, and gendered communication in educational, organizational, media, and relationship settings.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3336 - BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION


    Focuses on a skills-based approach to professional communication in the business environment. Topics include presentations, technology, interviewing, writing, and interpersonal and group communication in a simulated business environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 1101, COM 1102 or COM 1103 and 60 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 3345 - THE DARK SIDE OF INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION


    The Dark Side of Communication explores the different problems, events, and behaviors that occur in personal relationships such as aggression, bullying, criticism, deception, infidelity, and secret keeping. This course will examine and identify the ways to manage these problems and to communicate productively in family, romantic, friend and workplace relationships.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    COM 3360 - ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION


    Examines the process of communication within organizations. Investigates formal and informal communication networks to gain a greater understanding of the vital role that they play within organizational structures and operations.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 1101, COM 1102 or COM 1103.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4400 - COMMUNICATION THEORY


    Communication Theory introduces students to theories and related concepts necessary for describing, explaining, and predicting human communication.  Students will develop a better understanding of the process of communication (i.e., intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, culture, gender, organizational, and media effects) and the ways to appropriately evaluate communication theories.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4401 - PERSUASION


    A study of the psychology of persuasion and its use in a free society, and propaganda and its effect on our daily living. Prepares the student to evaluate persuasive messages, to use persuasion effectively, and to appreciate the ethics of persuasion.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4403 - SPEECH WRITING


    Practical experience in the techniques of speech writing for speakers and public relations practitioners. Emphasis is placed on actual speech writing situations.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4406 - DIGITAL VIDEO EDITING


    Instruction in the mechanics and techniques of non-linear video editing ranging from logging and organizing materials to understanding and employing differing types of editing methods. Hands on experience with various editing platforms such as Final Cut pro and AVID.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GRA 1101 and COM 3301.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4407 - ELECTRONIC MEDIA WORKSHOP


    This course emphasizes synthesizing knowledge and skills learned in other electronic media courses requiring students to use advanced techniques taught with a variety of media software. Students will work singularly and in small professional production teams in the areas of production and programming development, advanced writing of proposals and teleplay, and digital post-production. Students are expected to complete a semester long project utilizing skills and knowledge taught throughout courses in the Electronic Media Program. Active participation in Mountaineer News will be required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2201, COM 2208, COM 3301, and COM 3304.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    COM 4410 - INTERNSHIP


    Supervised and evaluated participation in varied settings provides practical application of theoretical principles.

    Credits: 6 - 12 cr. Notes: May be taken for 6 through 12 credits.
  
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    COM 4415 - CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN HUMOR


    A critical study of contemporary humor employing a variety of communication theories of analysis and criticism. Areas such as television, film, writing, and stand-up will be examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4420 - PUBLIC RELATIONS WORKSHOP


    An advanced study focused on the planning and execution of a public relations campaign.  Working in teams, students research, develop, execute, and evaluate a public relations campaign for a local nonprofit organization.  Students engage in a planning process to develop public relations objectives, strategies, and tactics designed to meet the client needs.  Implementation of a special event is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take COM 2210 and COM 3320.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4425 - COMMUNICATION TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT


    Advanced study of the construction, preparation, and delivery of professional presentations and workshops. Designed to familiarize the student with the research, audience analysis, and technology used to present and evaluate professional presentations and workshops.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 1101, COM  1102 or COM 1103 and 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4435 - GLOBAL MEDIA


    Designed to familiarize students with global media systems and issues. Lectures, research projects, and classroom presentation of global media examples are used to broaden perspectives and international understanding.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2201 and Must have 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4440 - COMMUNICATION LAW


    Provides a background in communication law as it affects the conduct of the print and electronic media industries. Will study landmark cases and investigate legal industry, and ethical issues which confront communication professionals.

    Prerequisites & Notes: COM 2201.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4450 - SPECIAL PROJECTS


    A project initiated by the student to increase his/her knowledge in an advanced area not offered as a regular class. Intensive study of a subject area under the guidance of a faculty member who has special expertise in that subject.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits, but not to exceed 9 credits total.
  
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    COM 4485 - SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION


    Learning how to work effectively in groups. The dynamics of cooperative communication situations and skills associated with interpersonal relations and group goal achievement. Emphasis on presentational speaking, agenda management, problem solving, decision making, conflict and cohesion, project management, leadership, participation theory, listening, verbal and nonverbal choices, planning and conducting meetings.  As the capstone for Organizational Commuication, you will focus on all of the program outcomes in this course.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take: COM 1101, COM 1102 or COM 1103.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
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    ECO 1001 - INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC THINKING


    This course is an introduction to the essential concepts of Economics and the way economists approach problems. Topics include opportunity
    cost, supply, demand, perfect competition, monopoly, Aggregate demand, inflation, fiscal policy, and monetary policy.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    ECO 1101 - PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS


    An introduction to aggregate economics with emphasis on interdependence of sectors of an economy, aggregate concepts, determination of national income and fiscal and monetary policy for stabilization.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 1102 - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS


    Examines the mechanism of the free enterprise system; pricing, production, and employment under various market conditions; functional distribution of income; selected topics in modern theory of general equilibrium and welfare economics.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 2205 - CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC PROBLEMS


    Examination of some of our crucial economic problems: unemployment, inflation, poverty; also some of the minor issues: right-to-work, national debt, and of several international concerns, e.g., the Common Market.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ECO 1101 and ECO 1102 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 3301 - INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMIC THEORY


    Develops models of the macroeconomy and analyzes the level and distribution of income, theories of unemployment, theories of consumption, theories of the public economy, theories of investment, the role of money, theories of crisis, theories of inflation, and theories of growth from alternative paradigms. A macroscopic view of the economy and the ability to analyze and forecast business conditions are developed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ECO 1101 and ECO 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 3302 - INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMIC THEORY


    Introduction to the models and methods of modern microeconomic theory, concentrating on individual and firm decision making and on industry equilibrium; a brief treatment of general equilibrium theory and welfare analysis.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ECO 1101 and ECO 1102 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 3305 - ECONOMETRICS


    The orientation of this course is toward the analysis and interpretation of economic data. This course will examine the general linear regression model and its application to economics, including violations of the classical model assumptions.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 3310 - BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC FORECASTING


    This course is an introduction to the various methods economists and business managers use to forecast economic variables. Topics covered include regression techniques, exponential smoothing, decomposition of time series, moving averages, ARIMA models, and VAR models.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ECO 1101, ECO 1102 and MA 1125.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 3311 - MONEY AND BANKING


    An inquiry into the monetary system of the U.S. Brief examination of historical development; the functioning of monetary policy is considered. Emphasis is on the public/private nature of our banking system.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ECO 1101 and ECO 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 3315 - PUBLIC FINANCE


    Investigates theories of taxation; normative and positive theories of the public economy; various taxes; tax incidence and the distribution of income and wealth; taxes and microeconomic behavior; and the distribution of expenditure benefits. Provides students with an understanding of the functions of taxation and public expenditures in the process of accumulation and legitimization.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ECO 1101 and ECO 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 3333 - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC ISSUES AND POLICY


    This course explores why nations trade, the effects of barriers to trade, trade policies of various nations, international agencies and agreements.  It also examines the balance of payments, different types of foreign exchange polices, and the IMF.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 credits completed at registration.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 4450 - INTERNSHIP


    Designed to allow the student the opportunity to learn in a professional setting. It must involve the application of economic theory and provide an opportunity for work involving the application of academic skills. Consult an academic advisor for departmental internship policies.

    Credits: 3 - 12 cr.
  
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    ECO 4485 - MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS


    A rigorous development and application of microeconomic theory with an emphasis on the tools and techniques most useful to managers in a decision making environment. Topics include demand analysis, production and cost analysis, market structure, pricing strategies, risk analysis, estimation and forecasting.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 1125 and MA 1170 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ECO 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1, 2 or 3 credits at one time.
  
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    ED 1102 - INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION


    An introduction to professional careers in K-12 education. Students examine teaching responsibilities, certification requirements, career prospects, and attributes of successful teachers. Topics include historical and social foundations of education, schools in a multicultural society, political influences on education, observations in schools, frameworks for teaching, and beginning a professional portfolio.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 1105 - EDUCATION FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL


    This course introduces first year students to the University, teacher education, and their major program.  Students will be encouraged to become engaged members of the University learning community and to participate fully in the Mansfield University undergraduate experience.
    The course will also prepare students with information and tools for achieving teacher education program and Mansfield University success. 

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    ED 1110 - FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION


    An introduction to professional careers in K-12 education.  Students examine teaching responsibilites, certification requirements, career prospects, and attributes of successful teachers.  Topics include historical and social foundations of education, schools in a multicultural society, political influences on education, observations in schools, frameworks for teaching, and beginning a professional portfolio.

    Credits: 2 cr.
  
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    ED 2205 - EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY


    A study of the application of learning theory principles to the educational and institutional setting. Provides demonstrations and field experiences to enhance the applicability of these principles.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 2260 - ASSESSMENT IN EDUCATION


    Students will study the domains of Educational Objectives and different types of formal and informal assessment techniques to assess young children.  Students will also learn how to interpret and utilize multiple assessment results to make educational decisions.  Students will develop an authentic assessment related to their area of teaching specialization. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 2276 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS


    This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers with the skills to provide Linguistically and culturally appropriate instruction, assessment, and learning opportunities for students identified as English Language Learners (ELL).  We will examine current trends and issues in Second Language Acquisition (SLA), theoretical notions and research in the study of language acquisition, enculturation, acculturation, and cognitive development.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take SPE 1001. Restricted to Ed majors.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    ED 2606 - FIELD EXPERIENCE


    This is a site-based pre-student teaching field experience in a diverse ethnic, language or SES community. Students will participate daily in public school classrooms in their field of study. Based on the site location, students will participate in community projects, interact in learning forums with other pre-service teachers and visit historical and cultural sites and museums.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1110 or SPE 1001.

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    ED 3260 - ASSESSMENT IN EDUCATION


    A basic testing and measurements course. Students study the domains of educational objectives, evaluation theory, the application of basic statistics to test data, and principles for selecting and interpreting standardized tests. Students will develop a test related to their area of teaching specialization.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3308 - TEACHING FOR MIDDLE-LEVEL LITERACY


    This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to support literacy among middle-school students, grades 4-8.  The course focuses on foundations of literacy, components of reading, types of texts, reading and writing assessment, reading and writing instruction and support strategies, and middle-level literacy research. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1110.

    Co-Requisites ED 3400.

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    ED 3310 - CONTENT AREA READING AND WRITING


    Designed to provide instructional experiences that enable secondary content teaching candidates and special field teacher candidates to develop selected basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding the reading learning process. May be offered in a modular timeframe format.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 3320.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3312 - TEACHING SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS


    Designed to prepare the student for the teaching of middle school/junior/senior high school English communication arts. In investigating the present resources of the school, the needs of the learners, and the potential for development in the field of English language study, the student will be preparing to function in either a traditional or experience-based school curriculum.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3313 - TEACHING SECONDARY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY


    Designed to prepare preservice teachers to teach science and technology to middle school and high school students. Content in the course includes principles, materials, strategies, and techniques for teaching science and technology.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3314 - TEACHING SECONDARY MATHEMATICS


    Examines methods of teaching secondary school mathematics in the “Information Age”, the mathematics education reform movement, curricular changes and the standards for school mathematics, instructional methodology, use of materials, and development of skills required of secondary school mathematics teachers.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3316 - TEACHING SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES


    This course provides a thorough background in the methods and materials for the teaching of social studies. Emphasis is placed on self-directed inquiry that focuses on identifying issues, problems, and contexts and on methods to incorporate this knowledge and these skills into classroom instruction. Students will have an opportunity to plan and implement practice strategies in a classroom setting.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1102 or ED 1110 and must be a teacher education candidate.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3317 - TEACHING SECONDARY FOREIGN LANGUAGES


    Emphasizes methods of teaching language skills, lesson organization, language resources, multimedia applications including computer technology and the history of foreign language teaching.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3320 - OBSERVATION AND PARTICIPATION - SECONDARY


    Provides secondary education students with opportunities to observe and participate in secondary schools prior to student teaching. Topics addressed include effective teaching and classroom discussion techniques, lesson and unit planning, and classroom management and discipline. Students receive supervision and feedback on their classroom performance from classroom teachers and the college instructor. Offered in a modular timeframe format.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisite: ED 3310.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3324 - TEACHING MIDDLE-LEVEL MATHEMATICS


    This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach mathematics to middle-school students, grades 4-8.  The course focuses on implementation of state- and national-level mathematics teaching standards, assessment of middle-level mathematics understanding, developmentally appropriate mathematics instructional techniques, and research in mathematics education. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1110.  Completed requirements for Gate One.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3326 - TEACHING MIDDLE-LEVEL SOCIAL STUDIES


    This course provides a thorough background in the methods and materials for the teaching of social studies in grades 4-8.  Emphasis is placed on self-directed inquiry, which focuses on identifying issues, problems, and contexts, and on methods to incorporate this knowledge and these skills into classroom instruction.  Students will have an opportunity to plan and implement practice strategies of their own in the classroom. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1110, ED 2205, GEG 1101, HST 1111, HST 2201 and completion of Gate One requirements.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3327 - TEACHING MIDDLE-LEVEL SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY


    This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to teach science to middle-school students, grades 4-8.  The course focuses on implementation of state- and national-level science teaching standards, safety and welfare, techniques for assessment and instruction, nature of science and technology, socially important issues related to science and technology, and utilization of community resources for science and technology education. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1110 and complete Gate One requirements.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ED 3400 - SCHOOL EXPERIENCES AT THE MIDDLE LEVEL


    A pre-student teaching intensive field experience course, focusing on history and philosophy of middle-level education, teaching at the middle level, understanding of early adolescent development, and professionalism. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 3324, ED 3327 and 60 earned credits.

    Co-Requisite ED 3308.

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    ED 4400 - STUDENT TEACHING


    (By arrangement) Opportunity to apply knowledge and skills acquired in professional preparation. Accomplished by a field experience in university established centers under supervision of qualified cooperating teachers. Observations and conferences are scheduled by the departmental supervisor.

    Credits: 12 cr.
  
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    ED 4400L - SENIOR LAB: BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL


    This lab is designed to develop and refine professional competencies prior to accepting a teaching position.   Topics include current issues; school organization, administration, and law; teacher certification issues; collective bargaining and unions; philosophies of teaching; seeking a professional position; and beginning a teaching career. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisite ED 4400

    Credits: 0 cr.
  
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    ED 4460 - PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR


    Designed to develop and refine professional competencies prior to accepting a teaching position. Topics include current issues; school organization, administration, and law; techniques for seeking a professional position; teacher certification issues; collective bargaining and unions; philosophies of teaching; seeking a professional position; and beginning a teaching career.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: Senior standing in teacher education; taken during student teaching semester.

    Credits: 2 cr.
  
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    ED 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
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    ELE 1150 - INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION


    An introduction to the teaching of young children, birth through age eight; current issues and practices; historic and future trends; and assessment of one’s strengths and interests related to the career opportunities in early childhood education.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 1190 - CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND COGNITION I: PRENATAL TO 5 YEARS


    This course covers child development, with focus on related cognitive process of children from prenatal age to 5 years old.  Candidates will develop knowledge, skills, & competencies in a comprehensive range of developmental topic areas: language, social, moral, and physical areas.
    Other topics include the needs of young children and family influences.  Candidates will learn developmentally appropriate practices to include educational contexts, assessment, and classroom applications; the use of data-driven research about young children; and identification with young childhood education including professional organizations (PDE, NAEYC, & ACEI).  

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 2210 - CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND COGNITION II: 6 - 9 YEARS


    This course covers child development, with focus on related cognitive process of children from 6-9 years old.  Candidates will develop knowledge, skills, and competencies in a comprehensive range of developmental topics areas: cognitive, language, social, moral, and physical areas.
    Other topics include the needs of young children and family influences.  Candidates will learn developmentally appropriate practices to include educational contexts, assessment, and classroom applications; the use of data-driven research about young children; and identification with young childhood education including professional organizations (PDE, NAEYC, and ACEI). 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 1190.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ELE-5550
  
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    ELE 2220 - CHILD DEVELOPMENT


    Examines development from conception and infancy, through preschool and middle school, and ends with adolescence. Major developmental theories that focus on the interaction of heredity and the environment are the key components.

    Prerequisites & Notes: PSY 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 2260 - ASSESSMENT IN EDUCATION


    Students will study the domains of Educational Objectives and different types of formal and informal assessment techniques to assess young children. Students will also learn how to interpret and utilize multiple assessment results to make educational decisions. Students will develop an authentic assessment related to their area of teaching specialization.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1102

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    ELE 2800 - EARLY CHILDHOOD INTEGRATED CURRICULUM and METHODS


    Students learn to build on children’s experience and knowledge to foster development of skills in language, communication, observation, investigation, inquiry, collaboration, citizenship, and social interactions, using play, visual and auditory stimulation, and hands-on manipulation of developmentally appropriate resources.  Family, linguistic, cultural, and community backgrounds, individual approaches to learning; and informal knowledge will be addressed, as will issues of self-control and self-esteem.  Students learn to introduce content in language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, physical health, music, integrated arts, and technology to pre-school children. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1110.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3263 - PRESCHOOL CURRICULUM AGES 3 - 5


    Addresses aspects of a quality preschool program. Topics this course examines include: theoretical foundations of teaching and learning, children ages 3 - 5; preschool curriculum models; key components of a preschool program; an integrated curriculum to foster children’s development; and adapting curricula for children in inclusive preschool settings. This course will require observations and participation in a preschool setting.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3301 - OBSERVATION AND PARTICIPATION - ELEMENTARY


    Provides juniors with the following observation, participation and professional guidance experiences: observation of an elementary classroom; orientation to policies and practices of an elementary school; opportunity to observe the in-service teacher in the performance of his/her duties; introduction to administrative duties of an elementary classroom; the privilege of working with individual children, small groups of children and an entire classroom under supervision; and the opportunity to receive feedback on performance from the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3362 - EMERGING LITERACY


    Theoretical foundations and the components of a developmentally appropriate literacy program for children ages 4-8 are introduced. Topics include: teaching and assessment strategies, instructional resources, classroom management, grouping for instruction, and involving parents.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3383 - LITERACY METHODS I: PRE-K-1


    Developmentally appropriate literacy instruction for the preschool and early grades featuring the following: foundation in research and theory; word-level instructional strategies; text-level comprehension strategies; reading-writing connections; instructional approaches and materials; and assessment. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 2800.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3384 - TEACHING ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS


    Methods of teaching mathematics in the “Information Age”, the reform movements curricular changes and emphasis, instructional methodology and use of materials, and development of mathematics skills required of elementary school teachers are examined.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3386 - SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS FOR THE DEVELOPING CHILD


    Students learn the scope and sequence of the social studies that encompass the seven disciplines of history, geography, political science, economics, sociology, psychology, and anthropology and align with the ten NCSS thematic strands.  They incorporate developmentally appropriate multicultural social studies content, integrative cross-curricular models, research-based instructional methods employing current technologies to plan lessons and as social studies unit for children in Pre-K to grade 4 settings. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 2800.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3387 - SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY METHODS


    Develops techniques for fostering understanding of the nature of science and strengthening the habit of conducting first-hand scientific inquiry into the natural world.  Emphasis is placed on developmentally appropriate techniques for bridging early conceptions of the natural world to scientific conceptions, along with implementation of state and national science/technology standards. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 2800.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    ELE 3388 - MATHEMATICS METHODS I: GRADES PRE K-1


    Planning, implementing, and assessment of developmentally appropriate mathematics instruction in preschool through first grade. Emphasis on materials, activities, manipulatives, learning centers, games, children’s literature, and technologies to build emergent conceptual mathematical understandings. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 2800.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3391 - BEHAVIORAL, SOCIAL, AND EMOTIONAL ISSUES


    Addresses “at-risk” factors in children and the classroom techniques that teachers may use to address students’ behavioral, social, and emotional needs. Topics examined in the course include classroom management and discipline, students’ social relationships, students’ emotional well being, and gender issues in teaching. Teachers will learn to identify students who are victims of physical abuse and to make appropriate professional referrals.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3395 - INTEGRATING THE ARTS FOR THE DEVELOPING CHILD


    Examines the nature of creativity and varied uses of creativity and the arts in elementary lesson planning, teaching, and curriculum development; areas of study include art, music, drama, storytelling, movement and dance, poetry, and children’s literature; emphasis is placed upon the uses of creativity and the arts by classroom teachers to enhance their teaching across the curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 2800.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 3400 - SCHOOL EXPERIENCES IN BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL


    This course provides a pre-student teaching extended field experience in Pre-K through fourth grade education.  Field experiences will be marked by attention to candidate reflection, continuous learning, research-validated and ethical practices, advocacy for children, knowledge and understanding of diversity, collaboration with others, adapting instruction to individual student learning differences, and commitment to professional standards and growth.  This field experience course should be scheduled as close to student teaching as possible and after students have completed a significant number of education methods courses. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take ELE-2800 and earned 60 credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 4400 - STUDENT TEACHING


    (By arrangement) Opportunity to apply knowledge and skills acquired in professional preparation. Accomplished by a field experience in university established centers under supervision of qualified cooperating teachers. Observations and conferences are scheduled by the departmental supervisor.

    Credits: 12 cr.
  
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    ELE 4400L - (W)SENIOR LAB: BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL


    This lab is designed to develop and refine professional competencies prior to accepting a teaching position.  Topics include current issues; school organization, administration, and law; teacher certification issues; collective bargaining and unions; philosophies of teaching; seeking a professional position; and beginning a teaching career. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisites:  Take ELE-4400

    Pre-requisites:  Students are registered for this lab by the Field Experience Office, only after approval of the Student Teaching Application.  Therefore, no student would be admitted to student teaching without the rest of the education program.

    Credits: 0 cr.

  
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    ELE 4403 - (W)LANGUAGE ARTS METHODS FOR THE DEVELOPING CHILD


    Language arts instruction in Pre-K-4 early childhood and elementary education.  Featured topics include language arts theory and research; instructional techniques for developing listening, speaking, reading, writing, visual representations, and viewing; spelling, handwriting, grammar, and word study; comprehension.  Particular emphasis is placed on writing instruction. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 3383.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 4405 - EARLY SCHOOL CURRICULUM AGES 6-8


    Addresses aspects of a quality early school program (K-3rd grade). Topics examined in this course include: theoretical foundations of teaching and learning with children, age 6-8; perspectives that inform curriculum planning; components of an early grade program; an integrated curriculum; and adapting curricula for children in inclusive settings. Students will team-teach with classmates in an early grade in a local school.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 1150 and ELE 3263.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 4425 - LITERACY METHODS II: GRADES 2-4 LITERATURE II


    Builds on literacy and language models and teaching methods from ELE 3383, with an emphasis on differentiating instruction based on formal and informal reading assessments.  Approaches to designing data-driven interventions for individuals and research-based classroom literacy methods are explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 3383.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 4426 - MATHEMATICS METHODS II: GRADES 2-4


    Elementary mathematics instruction in grades two, three, and four.  Featured topics include problem solving, teaching for conceptual understanding, uses of manipulatives, number and operations, early algebra and geometry, measurement, and data analysis and probability.  Knowledge and application of national and state standards for the teaching of mathematics. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 3388.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 4435 - LITERACY METHODS II


    Builds on literacy and language models and teaching methods from ELE 3383, with an emphasis on differentiating instruction based on formal and informal reading assessments.  Approaches to designing data-driven interventions for individuals and research-based classroom literacy methods are explored. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE 3383.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ELE 4460 - PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR


    Designed to develop and refine professional competencies prior to accepting a teaching position. Topics include current issues; school organization, administration, and law; techniques for seeking a professional position; teacher certification issues; collective bargaining and unions; philosophies of teaching; seeking a professional position; and beginning a teaching career.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: Senior standing in teacher education; taken during student teaching semester.

    Credits: 2 cr.
  
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    ENG 0090 - BASIC WRITING SKILLS


    Designed to prepare students to do college-level writing. DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD TOTAL CREDITS NEEDED FOR GRADUATION.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Minimum passing grade:C-.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    ENG 1112 - COMPOSITION I


    Intensive reading and writing of expository prose. Analytical and critical thinking and college-level research skills are emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Exemption from ENG 0090 or equivalent transfer course.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ENG 1115 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE


    Introduction to reading poetry, fiction, drama for understanding and enjoyment.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ENG 2130 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES


    An intensive introduction to the discipline of literary studies for current and prospective English majors and minors. Students will become acquainted with literary genres and terms, learn strategies for reading and understanding literature, and develop critical skills for discussing and analyzing literary texts.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    ENG 2208 - READINGS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE


    An introductory level course for the non-English major to develop interpretive and critical-analytical skills, cultural understanding, and enjoyment of literature through selected readings in American literature.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ENG 2220 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE


    A study of one of the following topics: African-American Literature, Women’s Literature, other Minority Literature, Recent Literature, Film, or Folklore. May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ENG 2222 - SLAVE NARRATIVE


    Students taking this course will read, discuss, and write about a variety of slave narratives from Equiano’s 1789 tale to Bok’s 2003 narrative. We will discuss the slave narrative as a genre, the authors’ motivations for publishing such accounts, and the social and literary impact of these texts. Students will hone their writing and critical thinking skills as well as develop an historical understanding of U.S. and recent worldwide slavery and slave narratives as we read, discuss, and write about a number of texts. Expect quizzes, in-class writing, informal response papers, and exams. Honors students will also give an oral presentation.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ENG 2223 - CIVIL RIGHTS AUTOBIOGRAPHY


    ENG 2223 examines the Civil Rights Autobiography as a genre as well as the motivations people have for writing about their experiences during the Civil Rights Movement. It considers the literary, historical, and social concerns of a variety of texts written by Movement leaders and self-described “foot soldiers.” Students will develop critical reading skills and a greater knowledge of an important era of recent American history as they read, write about, and discuss a selection of autobiographies.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    ENG 2225 - ENGLISH GRAMMAR


    A systematic description of the rules of modern English grammar, making use of both traditional and contemporary grammatical theories.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ENG 2226 - HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE


    A study of the development of the English language from Old English to modern times with special attention to the causes of linguistic change.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    ENG 2237 - ENVIRONMENTAL LITERATURE AND SUSTAINABILITY


    ENG 2237 examines environmental literature from the last 150 years to explore the interaction of humans and nature with a focus on how the texts reveal different approaches to sustainability and to evolving ideas of what terms such as human, animal, nature, culture, and sustainability mean. Starting from the assumption that sustainability is a scientific as well as social issue, the class applies a variety of disciplinary and analytical thinking to the texts, broadens perspectives through class discussion, and hones critical thinking skills through writing assignments.

    Credits: 3crs.
  
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    ENG 2252 - INTRODUCTION TO POETRY WRITING


    Designed to help students develop their voices and styles as poets and to discover and utilize the various poetic devices and forms through writing exercises, reading and discussing poems, discussing one another’s poems in a supportive atmosphere and through revising poems.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ENG 3252.
  
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    ENG 2254 - INTRODUCTION TO FICTION WRITING


    Designed to help students find their true voice and true concerns as writers while mastering the essentials of the art. Emphasis is on writing exercises and then complete works, but also on becoming better readers. In-depth discussion of student work, the assigned readings, and the process of writing.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ENG 3254.
  
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    ENG 2268 - SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE


    Survey of Major British literature from Old English through the present.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr.
 

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