Apr 20, 2024  
Mansfield University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
  • ENG 3305 - COMPARATIVE LITERATURE


    Examines major works in a genre or movement, comparing two or more national literatures.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for a total of nine credits. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • ENG 3307 - LITERATURE IN ENGLISH FROM AROUND THE WORLD


    Study of literature written in English outside of the British Isles and the United States.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • ENG 3313 - COMPOSITION II


    Advanced writing and analytical thinking based on texts from across the curriculum. Must be passed with a minimum grade of “C-” before graduation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 and 45 credits earned.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Foundations of Knowledge – Written Communication,
    General Education Core
  
  • ENG 3316 - CREATIVE NON-FICTION PROSE WRITING


    Students will write about subjects of interest and importance to them using literary techniques and devices. Will read and discuss a selection of book-length non-fiction works: memoirs, diaries, socio-political commentary, and nature writing. Writing techniques and exercises designed to stir creativity and stimulate ideas will be used.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 2202.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Language and Literature
  
  • ENG 3320 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE


    A specialized study of a topic in literature, film, or folklore.

    Credits: 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for a total of 9 credits. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities,
    Language and Literature
  
  • ENG 3324 - COMPOSITION THEORY & PRACTICE


    Analysis of current theories about the writing process and methods of applying these theories, with actual practice in tutoring writing.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 and ENG 3313.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ENG 3326 - WOMEN’S LITERATURE


    A study of literature by and about women in its literary, cultural, and social contexts. May be topical, thematic, or period-based. May include such authors as Austen, Bronte, Chopin, Woolf, Emecheta, Morrison, and Tan.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities,
    Language and Literature
  
  • ENG 3327 - AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE


    This course studies a prominent dimension of African-American Literature. Potential topics include specific genres, important time periods, major or minor authors, comparative multicultural contexts. Students hone their critical reading and writing skills in this important and growing area of American literature.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities,
    Language and Literature
  
  • ENG 3328 - LESBIAN AND GAY LITERATURE


    This course focuses on literature by and about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, and what it is to be LGBT in our society. Literature will be studied in conjunction with film, music, television, newspaper and magazine articles, art, and history. The emphasis of the course will be on active discussion and close scrutiny of the literature, our society, and ourselves.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Ethics and Civic Responsibility,
    Language and Literature
  
  • ENG 3332 - NATURE WRITING


    Based on reading, observation, and experience, students will write creative non-fiction prose about nature and discuss each other’s work. The course will deal with such issues as the importance of place, the role of science in personal responses to nature, the nature of Nature, and the meaning of “nonfiction” in nature writing.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Environmental, Economic, Social and Personal Sustainability,
    Language and Literature
  
  • ENG 3333 - ADVANCED WRITING FOR ENGLISH MAJORS


    Designed to refine the writing skills of English majors, with an emphasis on critical analysis and the mechanics of writing. Students will read and write about a literary, rhetorical, or linguistic concept chosen by the instructor (irony in literature, for example) and revise at least one essay from their English portfolio.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1130 and two upper division ENG classes.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ENG 3350 - OLD AND MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE


    Study of major British writers and works from the Anglo Saxon period to 1500. Selections may include Old English lyric and narrative poetry (Like Beowulf) in translation, and Middle English romances, allegories, bawdy tales, plays, songs, and mystical writings, some in the original language, some in translation. Authors may include Chaucer, Julian of Norwich, Langland, Malory, and that most prolific of medieval authors, Anonymous.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness
  
  • ENG 3351 - ENGLISH RENAISSANCE LITERATURE


    A study of major writers from 1500 to 1660, the Reformation through the English Civil War. Authors include Sydney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, and Milton.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness
  
  • ENG 3352 - SHAKESPEARE


    Selected plays of Shakespeare with interpretation, evaluation, and attention to his development as a dramatist and poet.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 and one of the following: ENG 1130 or ENG 1115 or ENG 2207 or ENG 2209.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Information Literacy
  
  • ENG 3356 - EIGHTEENTH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE


    A study of major British writers from 1660 to 1800. The course will include both primary texts and literary criticism addressing the literature of the period. Includes authors such as Behn, Defoe, Pope, Richardson, Fielding, Smith, and Radcliffe.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Information Literacy
  
  • ENG 3359 - NINETEENTH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE


    A study of major British writers from the Romantic and Victorian eras. May include such authors as Burns, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Bronte, Carlyle, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, and Wilde.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness
  
  • ENG 3360 - BRITISH LITERATURE SINCE 1900


    A study of major writers of the twentieth century such as Yeats, Joyce, Woolf, Eliot, Beckett, Winterson, and Rushdie. Topics of study include modernism, postmodernism, literary responses to cultural upheaval such as World War II, and post-colonialism.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness
  
  • ENG 3362 - AMERICAN ROMANTICISM AND TRANSCENDENTALISM


    A study of American Romanticism and Transcendentalism, focusing on the work of such writers as Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Whitman, Melville, Hawthorne, and Poe.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ENG 3363 - AMERICAN REALISM AND NATURALISM


    Study of American literature written between the Civil War and World War I. Possible authors include: Dickinson, Twain, James, Chopin, Crane, Chesnutt, Wharton, Dreiser, Wilkins Freeman, and Orne Jewett.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ENG 3364 - AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1900


    A study of major American writers since World War I, such as Wharton, Faulkner, Williams, Baldwin, Morrison, and Erdrich. Topics include modernism, postmodernism, race, and gender.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ENG 3371 - PROFESSIONAL WRITING


    This course teaches students to write for various purposes in professional contexts. Particular attention will be paid to issues of audience awareness and style. Students will write texts for various contexts, including, but not limited to, letters, resumes, memos, press releases, reports, analyses, and grants.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ENG 3376 - MAJOR GENRE


    A study of a major genre, such as poetry, drama, the novel, short fiction, nonfiction prose, or film.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 or ESL 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Humanities,
  
  • ENG 3381 - HISTORY OF LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM


    Survey of Western literary theory and criticism from Plato, Aristotle, and Horace to the New Critics.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Language and Literature
  
  • ENG 3382 - CONTEMPORARY LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM


    Survey of recent approaches to literature, including formalist, structuralist, post-structuralist, reader-response, psychoanalytic, feminist, marxist, new historical, and/or post-colonial literary criticism.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 and ENG 1130.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ENG 3385 - MAJOR AUTHOR


    A detailed study of a major author/auteur (or pair of authors/auteurs), such as Chaucer, Milton, Dickens, Brontë, Woolf, Faulkner, Morrison, or Hitchcock.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 and ENG 1130.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ENG 3389 - GRAPHIC NOVEL


    This course focuses on analyzing and creating graphic literature, also referred to as “comics”. Potential topics include specific genres, important time periods, major or minor authors, and comparative multicultural contexts.  Students hone their critical reading skills as well as their creative skills in this important and growing area of literature.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Arts and the Human Experience,
    Languages and Literature
  
  • ENG 4401 - SEMINAR IN LITERARY STUDIES


    A sustained, in-depth study of literature which draws on the expertise developed in previous English courses. Topics will vary. Students will complete a seminar-length researched paper/project, culminating in the public presentation of that work.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 and 75 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • ENG 4416 - NOVEL WRITING


    Students will read and discuss published novels and work on writing their own, critiquing and discussing one another’s work. Includes the first 3 chapters and a synopsis of the novel.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 3312 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
  • ENG 4495 - ENGLISH INTERNSHIP


    Offers practical work experience and the opportunity to apply and further develop skills such as writing and editing in a variety of professional settings. May be taken for six through twelve credits. No more than six credits count toward the major.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: Permission of the department chairperson and supervising faculty member.

    Variable Credits: 6-12 cr.
  
  • ENG 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
  • ES 3300 - HUMANS IN NATURE


    Students explore the relationship between people and the natural world emphasizing modes of analysis drawn from social science, humanities, and art disciplines. The course focuses on the interdisciplinary understanding of selected issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEG 1122 and one of the following: BSC 1103, CHM 1103 or GEL 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ES 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Working with an advisor outside the area of their majors, students produce interdisciplinary projects involving the relationship between people and nature.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Completion of 18 hours toward the Environmental Studies minor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ESL 0045 - INTENSIVE ENGLISH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS I


    Designed to improve the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of intermediate level non-native speakers of English in preparation for regular degree program academic work. Recommended for students with TOEFL scores between 450 and 500 or who have permission of the instructor. Meets ENG 0090 requirement. Credits do not count toward the total needed for graduation. May be repeated.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ESL 0046 - INTENSIVE ENGLISH FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS II


    Designed to improve the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of the advanced intermediate level non-native speakers of English in preparation for regular degree program academic work. Recommended for students who have successfully completed ESL 0045 or who have TOEFL scores between 500 and 515 or who have permission of the instructor. Meets ENG 0090 requirement. Credits do not count toward the total needed for graduation. May be repeated.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 0045.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • ESL 1112 - ESL COMPOSITION


    Composition for advanced level non-native speakers of English. Includes intensive reading and writing of expository prose. Assignments develop analytical and critical thinking skills and college-level research skills, with emphasis on the particular needs of ESL students. Meets ENG 1112 requirement. Students may not apply both ENG 1112 and ESL 1112 toward graduation requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ESL 0045 and ESL 0046 or permission of instructor. May be taken concurrently with ESL 1145.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Foundations of Knowledge – Written Communication
  
  • ESL 1145 - ADVANCED ENGLISH


    Designed to improve the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of advanced level non-native speakers of English in preparation for the TOEFL exam. Credits count toward the total needed for graduation. Recommended for students who have successfully completed ESL 0045 and 0046 or who have a TOEFL score of 515 or higher or who have permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ESL 0045 and ESL 0046 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • FIN 3301 - INTRODUCTION TO FINANCE


    Examines basic concepts and techniques for  identifying and solving elementary financial management problems. Topics include compound interest and time value of money, financial statement analysis, working capital management, cash flow analysis and capital budgeting, short-term financing, and stockholder equity valuation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ECO 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • FIN 3312 - FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS


    This course is an introduction to the money and capital markets of the United States, with an emphasis on the determination of financial asset value and the management of interest rate risk. Topics include the determination of interest rates, valuation of financial claims, financial markets, futures and options, managing interest rate risk, managing credit risk, asset management and pricing, liability management, and government regulation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ECO 1101 and ECO 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • FIN 3333 - INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT


    Examines international aspects of finance from the point of view of corporations doing business outside the sovereign boundaries.  Includes determination of exchange rates, various types of exposure faced by MNCs, international money and capital markets, export/import financing, currency swaps, international portfolio management, international capital budgeting, and foreign direct investment.  Examines the challenges and difficulties faced by MNC146s in doing business in China, India, South America and Eastern Europe.   

    Prerequisites & Notes: BUS 2249 and ECO 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness
  
  • FIN 3380 - MANAGERIAL FINANCE


    This course introduces the investment and financing decision of corporations.  Topics covered include valuation of stocks and bonds, time value of money, financial ratios, risk and expected return, capital investment analysis, corporate financing and dividend policy.  Some fundamental aspects of international finance are presented.  The course will also cover some current issues related to ethics in finance.  

    Prerequisites & Notes: BUS 2249 and ECO 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • FIN 4435 - INVESTMENT THEORY


    Introduction to financial policy with special emphasis on the practical application of risk-return theory. Investment decisions by individuals and firms, in stocks and bonds and other securities, made on the basis of incomplete information in an uncertain environment is covered. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: BUS 2249 and ECO 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • FR 1101 - INTRODUCTORY FRENCH I


    For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school French. Emphasis is on grammar, pronunciation drills, aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing with language lab.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 1102 - INTRODUCTORY FRENCH II


    Continuation of 1101 with language lab.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 1101 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 2201 - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I


    Reading texts, grammar review and further practice in aural comprehension, speaking, and writing with language lab.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Three years of high school French or FR 1102.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 2202 - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II


    Continuation of 2201 with language lab.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Four years of high school French or FR 2201.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 2205 - PHONETICS AND PRONUNCIATION


    A study of the speech organs, place and manner of articulation of French phonemes and their phonetic realizations, along with extensive practice exercises on pronunciation, intonation, stress and sentence rhythm. The numerous changes occurring in connected and rapid speech will be studies as well. Students will also be introduced to some French dialects and regional pronunciation patterns.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 1102 or equivalent; FR 2201 or higher is preferred.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3300 - CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH CIVILIZATION


    Designed to gain more fluency and develop writing skills. Examines socio-economic, political, and cultural topics.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3305 - ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION


    Continuation of 3300. Students make oral commentaries and write reports.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3306 - TOPICS IN FRENCH CIVILIZATION (HISTORY)


    A brief survey of French history, with particular attention to major events and personalities.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3307 - TOPICS IN FRENCH CIVILIZATION (GEOGRAPHY)


    A study of the geography of French-speaking countries.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3309 - TOPICS IN FRENCH CIVILIZATION (CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS)


    A study of the problems facing the people of French-speaking countries.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3310 - BUSINESS FRENCH


    An introduction to French business and its terminology: a broad study of the commercial procedures in France with a concentration on the acquisition of the necessary vocabulary.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3311 - INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE


    The course is designed to introduce students to important periods, genres, literary movements, and authors. It is based on the most recent French practices in teaching literature at an introductory level, with a concentration on poetry, essay, theatrical works, and autobiographical writings. It is designed to give students a sense of what constitutes a literary text as well as a capacity for analyzing texts, discussing themes and ideas, and improving their reading and writing skills. The course will cover examples of texts from poetry to the novel, from the Renaissance to the end of the XXth century, from tragedy to comedy, from entertainment to questioning and discussing major themes.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 2202 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3320 - ADVANCED FRENCH STRUCTURE


    A final review of the structure of French and study of short literary texts.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3330 - SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE I


    Selected readings of major French writers through the 1 8th century, outside readings and reports, literary movements, style and form.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3331 - SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE II


    Selected readings of major French writers since 1800; outside readings and reports, literary movements, style and form.

    Prerequisites & Notes: FR 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 3370 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    Open to students who wish to continue the study of French abroad. The number of credits granted is based upon validated credentials presented to the department. Plans for foreign study should be submitted at least one semester prior to departure. Regulations regarding study abroad are available in the Office of the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FR 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • FYS 1100 - FIRST YEAR SEMINAR


    First Year Seminar - Subject changes.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Foundations of Knowledge – First Year Seminar
  
  • GEG 1101 - WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY


    Regional study of the world with special emphasis on the diversity of human existence and the world-scale problems currently faced.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Social Sciences
  
  • GEG 1102 - HUMAN GEOGRAPHY


    Study of aspects and distribution of culture. Topics include: population, health, language, religion, and economic activities.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Western and Non-Western Global Cultures (Option2),
    Global Awareness, Social Sciences
  
  • GEG 1111 - PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY


    Introduces the earth-science component of geography. Topics include: earth-sun relationships, weather and climate, vegetation, soils, and landforms.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Natural and Physical Sciences,
    Global Awareness, Social Sciences
  
  • GEG 1122 - ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES


    Surveys a wide range of environmental issues. Topics include: population growth, soils, floods, water availability and quality, sewage treatment, solid and toxic waste, fossil fuels, nuclear power, and alternative energy sources.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Environmental, Economic, Social and Personal Sustainability,
    Global Awareness, Social Sciences
  
  • GEG 1130 - INTRO INFOGRAPHICS


    A basic course in how to make information visible by creating graphs, charts and maps using readily available software. Major topics include which graphics to use, how to design them, how to create them and how to integrate them into papers and presentations.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  • GEG 1800 - JOB SAFETY


    This course will cover basic safety procedures and OSHA regulations pertaining to common work sites, including well pads.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: SFM-1800
  
  • GEG 2400 - INTRODUCTION TO SURVEYING


    This course is an introduction and orientation to proper field surveying theory and techniques. Subject areas include taping, tape corrections, leveling, angle measurements, traversing, traverse adjustments, contouring, fundamentals of mapping, and proper use and care of surveying instruments. Students will also gain an understanding of the role that proper site surveying plays in the development of land parcels for different public and private applications.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEG 2800 - GIS/GPS


    Covers Geographic Information systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS, and how to integrate them with databases to solve practical problems.  Hands-on work is stressed.

    Credits: 4 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • GEG 2820 - MAP AND AIR PHOTO INTERPRETATION


    Studies the interpretation of maps and aerial photographs. Topics include: location systems, scale, portrayal of relief, introductory surveying techniques, photogrammetry, interpretation principles, and specific applications.

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
  • GEG 2880 - ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT


    This course will present land use management, with a primary emphasis on describing and explaining approaches, methods, and techniques for sustainable land use. Students will investigate the methods and tools by which local, state, and federal governments control the use of land and will put these to work by conducting a federal Environmental Impact Assessment of a local site.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEG 3000 - COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN


    This course introduces the fundamentals of design using CAD (Computer Assisted Drafting) software with particular emphasis on land use and environmental applications. The course covers the advantages of CAD compared to other drafting techniques, and introduces the main commands and procedures used in drawing and editing as well as view manipulation, inquiry, and plotting. Emphasis is on hands-on learning and comprehension of procedures based around applied problem sets.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEG 3020 - PRACTICUM


    An out-of-class learning experience that allows students to observe or participate in applied work.  Practicums are graded S or U - they do not affect GPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1-5 cr. Notes: May be repeated for a total of five credits. 
  
  • GEG 3060 - PRINCIPLES OF SOIL SCIENCE


    A survey course that examines the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils. Relationships between soils and plant growth, land use, watershed management, water pollution, and environmental protection form an integral part of the course. Field work is required.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEG 3200 - ADVANCED GIS


    This course will focus on the design theory and practical implementation of computer based Geographic Information Systems. The course will focus on application specific design strategies, and advanced tools (surface and grid analysis, 3-D analysis) and methods available in the ARC GIS environment. The course will be structured around several applied projects that organize and analyze spatial data using GIS software.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take GEG-2800

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEG 3280 - CARTOGRAPHY


    The principles and tools of cartography. Students use a combination of graphics software and mapping software to compile, design, and produce maps.

    Credits: 4 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • GEG 3312 - WEATHER AND CLIMATE


    Studies the basic concepts of meteorology and climatology. Topics include: causes and consequences of climate change, surface and upper-level processes, severe storms, clouds, and optical phenomena.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEG 3321 - (GEL) GEOMORPHOLOGY


    Studies how landforms develop and change. Surveys the major landform regions and national parks of the United States. Interpretation of aerial photographs is an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEG 1111 or GEL 1121 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEG 3345 - WEB BASED CARTOGRAPHY


    This course will demonstrate the role and duties of a cartographer or graphic artist in the design and construction of a graphic-intense website. Each student will design and produce an informative and interactive website that presents a thoroughly researched topic. Students will write HTML and simple scripts that control rollovers, image maps, and sliced images. In addition, they will learn about scanning, computer animation, and digital photography for the web.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEG 3280.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEG 3364 - GEOSTATISTICS


    An introduction to the methods of geographic measurement, such as data-gathering and statistical-computerized analysis. Intended to familiarize students with more advanced methodologies of geographic research.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • GEG 3380 - GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA


    An analysis of the physical and human aspects of the United States and Canada. Particular emphasis on regionalism and regional problems.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Social Sciences
  
  • GEG 3381 - GEOGRAPHY OF PENNSYLVANIA


    Analysis of the regional patterns of Pennsylvania. Topics include: topography, climate, water resources, mineral resources, and the historical development of economic regions within the State.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Social Sciences
  
  • GEG 3410 - GEOGRAPHIC RESEARCH


    Studies the techniques of research in geography as well as the effective written and oral presentation of results. Both a research paper and an oral presentation are required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEG 3364.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • GEG 4415 - SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN GEOGRAPHY


    Offers extensive field experience and the opportunity to observe, first-hand, a variety of natural and human processes and phenomena.

    Credits: 2-4 crs. Notes: May be taken for 2 through 4 credits.
  
  • GEG 4420 - (GEL) - REMOTE SENSING


    Examines color and color infrared aerial photography as well as Landsat, SPOT, Thermal and Radar imagery. Computer processing of Landsat data is an integral part of the course. GEG (GEL) 3290 recommended.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEG 4465 - SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE


    An upper-level seminar that integrates and applies concepts and skills taught in the basic courses of the Environmental Science emphasis.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  • GEG 4496 - INTERNSHIP


    Offers practical work experience and the opportunity to apply and further develop skills taught in the Geography and Geology Department.   All Internships will be graded S or U - they do not affect your GPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 6-12 crs. Notes: May be taken for 6 through 12 credits.
  
  • GEG 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
  • GEG 4500 - SENIOR SEMINAR


    A capstone course for Geography majors.  A research project and job search, to include compiling a vita and writing a cover letter for an actual job, are integral parts of the course. 

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  • GEL 1102 - ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY


    The relationship of man to his environment will be examined with particular emphasis to problems of natural hazards (earthquakes, flooding, landslides), construction, ground water management, resources, utilization, impact mitigation and geological planning.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Environmental, Economic, Social and Personal Sustainability,
    Natural Sciences
  
  • GEL 1121 - PHYSICAL GEOLOGY


    A study of the solid portion of the earth, the materials of which it is composed and the processes which are acting on it. Included are such topics as rocks and minerals, weathering, and geologic structure.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Natural and Physical Sciences,
    Natural Sciences
  
  • GEL 1121L - PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LAB


    Physical Geology lab.

    Credits: 0 cr. General Education Requirement: Natural Science
  
  • GEL 2810 - OIL AND GAS GEOLOGY


    A study of oil and natural gas resources focused on resource formation, occurrence, exploration and production methods, and regional prospects for oil and natural gas development. Students will be actively involved in map interpretation and written presentation of data.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEL 2820 - MAP AND AIR PHOTO INTERPRETATION


    Studies the interpretation of maps and aerial photographs. Topics include: location systems, scale, portrayal of relief, introductory surveying techniques, photogrammetry, interpretation principles, and specific applications.

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
  • GEL 2950 - PRINCIPLES OF MUDLOGGING


    This course will focus on common techniques of geologic data collection and description that are employed during drilling operations, with particular emphasis on regional subsurface geology and formation evaluation techniques. Students will learn basic rock identification and classification of drill cuttings using petrographic microscopes. They will also learn how common well logs (SP, Density, Gamma, etc.) are collected and interpreted in real time at drill pads. The course will also introduce the duties and responsibilities of a well site geologist in relation to the overall Exploration and Production process and personnel.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEL-1121

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEL 3290 - MAP AND AIR PHOTO INTERPRETATION


    Studies the interpretation of maps and aerial photographs. Topics include: Location systems, scale, protrayal of relief, introductory surveying techniques, photogrammetry, interpretation princiles, and specific applications.

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
  • GEL 3310 - HYDROLOGY


    Hydrology is the study of water in the geological environment. The emphasis of this course is on the occurrence, movement, quality and quantity of surface and groundwater. Students will solve problems using math, maps and software.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisite: GEL 3310L - Hydrology Lab

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
  • GEL 3310L - HYDROLOGY LAB


    This is a field-based lab that investigates surface and ground water. Students will make observations, collect data and solve problems related to stream discharge, ground water monitoring and water chemistry.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisite: GEL 3310.

    Credits: 0 cr.
  
  • GEL 3321 - GEOMORPHOLOGY


    Studies how landforms develop and change. Surveys the major landform regions and national parks of the United States. Interpretation of aerial photographs is an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEG 1111 or GEL 1121 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEL 3322 - HISTORICAL GEOLOGY


    A study of earth history that includes introductory through advanced topics related to geologic time, stratigraphy, paleontology, plate tectonics, and structural geology. Students will apply their new knowledge to solve a number of field, computer, and classroom-based problems. A special emphasis will be placed upon the application of historical geology to mineral resource and geologic hazard assessments.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEL 1121.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEL 3362 - MINERALOGY/PETROLOGY


    A study of rocks and minerals that includes: their chemical and physical properties, how they are identified, where they occur, how they form, and their importance to society. Students will be actively involved with specimen identification, worldwide web activities, and presentation assignments.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEL 1121.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • GEL 3500 - GEL MAPPING/ANALYSIS


    This course covers many of the basic techniques that are used in the collection, analysis and presentation of geologic field data. The course encompasses elements of structural geology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, and geophysics in an applied context. A large portion of the course content is presented through field and map-based exercises including a weekend mapping project.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GEL-1121 and GEL-1121L.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Informational Literacy
 

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