Apr 20, 2024  
Mansfield University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
  • RUS 3372 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See RUS 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • RUS 3373 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See RUS 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • RUS 3374 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See RUS 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • RUS 3375 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See RUS 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SCI 1104 - FORENSIC SCIENCE


    Forensic science is the application of science to law. this course will study the collection and identification of materials used as evidence. This will include an understanding of their physical and chemical nature and origins at the crime scene. Further, the student will utilize the collected evidence to suggest scenarios for crime scenes.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Natural and Physical Sciences,
    Natural Sciences
  
  • SCI 1107 - PHYSICAL SCIENCE I


    An introduction to astronomy, forces and motion, and energy. Students will often construct laboratory apparatus from readily available sources to make physical measurements. This general education course is particularly suitable for elementary education majors.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Natural and Physical Sciences,
    Natural Sciences
  
  • SCI 1108 - PHYSICAL SCIENCE II


    An introduction to the atom, chemistry, electricity and magnetism, sound, and light. Students will often construct laboratory apparatus from readily available sources to make physical measurements. This general education course is particularly suitable for elementary education majors.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Natural and Physical Sciences,
    Natural Sciences
  
  • SCI 3270 - NANOTECH LAB EXPERIENCE


    An intensive nanotechnology laboratory experience. Topics covered include: material safety and equipment; basic nanotechnology processes; thin film deposition; lithography; materials modification; and device characterization, packaging, and testing.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of Nanotechnology Coordinator required.

    Credits: 18 cr.
  
  • SCI 4400 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION


    This is a course for one to three credits for practicing teachers and for graduate and undergraduate students who are enrolled in education programs. The course may focus on one or more physical science topics, but content, activities, and methods will be treated with equal importance for a variety of classroom settings. The information, ideas, and activities obtained will be timely and useful to teachers in their classrooms.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
  • SFM 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO SAFETY MANAGEMENT


     

    An introduction to the basic principles of safety management and implementation of safety management systems in industrial and other types of organizations. Required as a first course for students enrolled in the BS Safety Management major.

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
  • SFM 1800 - JOB SITE SAFETY


    This course will cover basic safety procedures and OSHA regulations pertaining to common work sites, including well pads.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: GEG-1800
  
  • SFM 2001 - LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN SAFETY


    Legal and Ethical Issues in Safety -An overview of legal, regulatory, and ethical dimensions of safety management. Covers the basic aspects of OSHA regulation of safety and contrasts regulatory compliance with ethical responsibilities. Students will analyze case studies to understand and recommend appropriate actions.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SFM 2002 - REGULATION OF INDUSTRAIL HEALTH AND SAFETY


    An overview of the regulation of industrial health and safety. Students will gain an understanding of industrial and occupational health and safety, safety legislation and regulation, ergonomics and safety management, fire prevention and protection, safety systems, and various resources for ensuring the health and safety of an industrial workforce. Special attention will be given to the safety needs of the gas production and service industry.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SFM-1101

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SFM 3001 - SAFETY PROGRAM MANAGEMENT


    An overview of strategies for developing and managing safety programs. Students will gain an understanding of the elements of effective cultures of safety and design a basic safety education program for a simulated workplace need.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SFM-1101

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SFM 3002 - CRITICAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT


    A comprehensive overview of critical incident management. Students will gain an understanding of best practices for managing critical incidents that may put lives, property, or the environment at risk. Simulations of critical incidents will be used to ensure students learn relevant skills.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SFM-1101

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SFM 3003 - HUMAN FACTORS IN SAFETY


    An overview of human factors in safety management and accident prevention. Students will review theories of human factors in safety and learn through case analysis ways to reduce the probability of accidents by more effectively recognizing risks and managing human behaviors at the worksite.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SFM-1101

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SFM 4450 - SENIOR SEMINAR IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT


    This is a capstone seminar that addresses critical and advanced topics in safety management. Students will be expected to demonstrate a high level of critical thinking in written and oral work and leadership skills in identifying solutions to complex safety problems. All students will prepare a major presentation on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SFM-3003

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SOC 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY


    Introduction to the basic concepts, premises, and techniques involved in the scientific approach to the study of human societies. Analysis is made of selected aspects of social behavior at interpersonal, intergroup, and societal levels. Global perspectives are explored.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Social and Behavioral Sciences,
    Global Awareness, Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 1121 - CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS


    A survey of the major problems in contemporary society with special attention to the major paradigms (conflict, functionalist, interactionist) that are used to interpret the formation of social policy and social movement. Special focus is on social and economic justice and populations at risk globally and locally.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Ethics and Civic Responsibility,
    Global Awareness, Information Literacy, Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 2200 - AMERICAN MINORITIES


    An investigation of the individual and group processes by which the U. S. has been peopled and of the resulting racial, religious, and ethnic communities. Consideration will be given to the similarities and differences in the values and experiences of a variety of groups and to the relative strength of tendencies toward assimilation and toward preservation of distinguishing characteristics.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SOC 2203 - TELEPHONE SURVEY RESEARCH


    Provides training in applied social research. Students are directly involved in constructing an interview schedule, selecting a sample, conducting telephone interviews, coding and analyzing data, and writing a report.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SOC 1101, PSY 1101 or ANH 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy, Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 2232 - AMERICAN FAMILY SYSTEMS


    An examination of the diversity of marriage and family life in American society as reflected in changing social conditions and social policies. Focus is given to social and economic justice and populations at risk, including the identification and function of values, norms, and codes relevant to marriage and family decision making.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Social and Behavioral Sciences,
    Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 2260 - SOCIAL STRATIFICATION


    This general education course provides an introduction to the study of social stratification in the United States of America and around the world. Students will investigate the dimensions of inequality among social positions analyze the means by which individuals, groups and countries attain unequal rank, and critique theories of this intersection of class, race, gender and country. Explores the problems associated with theorizing about and measuring social class.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Social and Behavioral Sciences,
    Global Awareness, Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 3280 - SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR


    Explores sociological theories and research on deviant behavior. Emphasis is on understanding the social construction of what is considered deviance in society, the social patterns behind deviant behavior within society, and how deviance is a necessary part of society. Major and minor forms of deviant behavior will be explored using these perspectives.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SOC 3301 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR


    Overview of the major concepts, theories, and research findings in the field of organizational behavior. Examines the sociological analysis of organizations in modern society, the social dimensions of high performance organizations, and how to direct and lead individuals, groups and organizations.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SOC 3305 - SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION


    Analysis of the interrelationships between religion and other aspects of society, particularly with reference to the problems of order and change.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 3307 - SOCIAL RESEARCH I: RESEARCH DESIGN DATA COLLECTION


    Examines the basic relationship of research with social theory, the challenges of defining a problem for study, the selection of an appropriate sample, and the challenges faced in using various techniques to collect data from a sample. Careful consideration is given to the ethical issues that arise in the conduct of research.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • SOC 3308 - SOCIAL RESEARCH II: ANALYSIS, INTERPRETATION, AND APPLICATIONS


    Covers how social scientists handle quantitative data. Reviews the scientific method, causality, the types of variables encountered in social research, and how data informs social theory. The focus is on learning basic techniques for describing social science data and testing for relationships between variables. Includes training in statistical software package and student-driven applied research projects; thus previous training in statistics strongly recommended.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • SOC 3310 - SOCIOLOGY OF SEX AND GENDER


    This course introduces major sociological concepts, theories, and perspectives about gender and sex. The main purpose of this course is to explore how society and culture work together to shape our lives and our gender identities.  The course will explore the relationship between gender and major social institutions, such as family and economy.  This will examine how culture, economy, and education, maintain, reproduce, and change gender roles within the United States and across the world. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 24 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Social and Behavioral Sciences,
    Global Awareness, Social Science
  
  • SOC 3320 - SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION


    Globalization is profoundly remaking social structure and transforming the lives of people in every corner of the planet.  The objective of this course is to survey the distinct themes sub-areas that make up the sociology of globalization.  These include: theories of globalization; the global economy; political globalization; globalization and culture; transnational civil society/transnational social movements; globalization and gender/race/ethnicity; and transnational migration, etc.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SOC 3322 - SOCIOLOGY OF AGING


    Analyzes the influence of social interaction upon the process, stages, and problems of aging, particularly of older age. Student-conducted oral history is utilized not only as a catalyst for intergenerational understanding and respect, but also as a therapeutic social work technique designed to enhance the self-image of older people by having them look back over their personal histories and through that process help them to meet the human need to attain a self-appreciation of the validity and significance of their lives.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: SOC 5522. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Social and Behavioral Sciences,
    Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 3336 - POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY


    Covers the intersection of sociology and politics. Investigates the development of policy issues, people’s reactions and responses to them, and resolution of the issues in the public arena. Focuses on the dynamics of power and influence in the social relations: who has power, who does not, and why.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SOC 3350 - SELECTED TOPICS SEMINAR


    Review of a specialty area in anthropology, sociology or the study of a problem from an interdisciplinary position.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Upper division standing and permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 - 6 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 6 credits.
  
  • SOC 3357 - SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION


    This course is designed to introduce students to the major sociological theories and research in the area of education. Students will examine the history and structure of education in the U.S. and how the U.S. compares with other countries. Understanding who makes it and who doesn’t in the U.S. education system and why, is the major focus of the course.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • SOC 3360 - SOCIOLOGY OF MEDICINE


    This course includes the sociological study of physical health and illness, therapy, rehabilitation, and the organization of health care systems in the United States. It examines help-seeking behaviors, utilization of health care services, issues of bioethics, and the roles of health care service providers all from the sociological perspective. Race, class, and gender stratification within the health care system will also be explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Social and Behavioral Sciences,
    Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 3365 - DISABILITY AND SOCIETY


    This course examines the influence of societal structure in the socialization of persons with disabilities.  It examines various perspectives to view disability.  Students also learn the complexity and diversity of sociological issues surrounding disability, including those arising from the family, parenting, school, workplace and society, as well as social movements related to disability and other socialization issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes:

    Must have 30 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Social and Behavioral Sciences,
    Social Sciences

  
  • SOC 3370 - SOCIOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD


    This course explores the nature of childhood and the development and socialization of children from infancy through adolescence.  Through course readings, assignments, and discussions, the course will cover the agencies and social forces that shape children.  This course will incorporate the perspective, which rather than assuming that children are passive participants starts from the assumption that children are active participants who both shape and are shaped by their social world.  The course will also address the future of childhood which might be especially beneficial to current or future policy makers.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Approaches to Knowledge – Social and Behavioral Sciences,
    Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 4415 - AMERICAN VALUES IN CONFLICT


    Analyzes American values and values conflicts from a sociological perspective, placing such values and conflicts within a context of ideological orientation, ethnic/racial and social class diversity, group interaction, socio-cultural change, and societal policy.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Social Sciences
  
  • SOC 4441 - ORGANIZATIONAL INTERNSHIP


    Provides experience in the regular activities of a business, government agency, or social service organization. Students will prepare an analysis of the organization’s role system and its real or potential area of stress.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor; SOC 3301 strongly recommended.

    Credits: 6 - 15 cr.
  
  • SOC 4449 - PRACTICUM


    This course is designed to provide an applied experience working in an agency or organization. Students will develop an understanding of organization’s position in the community.  The student should become aware of the agency/organization’s social interaction patterns, the organization’s mission and role, and its strengths and weaknesses.  Students are expected to help the organization reach its goals through the application of sociological concepts and training.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SOC 4480 - SOCIAL SCIENCE THEORY


    Course examines classical theorists who have contributed to the development of sociology and anthropology.  Students review the historical, societal and intellectual situation surrounding the classical theorists, the linkages between their work, their backgrounds, and the major contributions that they have provided.  The role of theory in the process of conducting social science research is illuminated.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 12 semester hours of Sociology courses or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SOC 4495 - SENIOR SEMINAR


    This course provides Sociology and Anthropology majors an opportunity to integrate their learning experiences.  Two aspects of these learning experiences will be demonstrated through 1) career-oriented learning applications and 2) academic learning applications.  Students will create a portfolio and a capstone paper and do a professional presentation in the chosen focus area.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 60 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SOC 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
  • SPA 1101 - INTRODUCTORY SPANISH I


    For students who have not previously studied Spanish. Fundamentals of grammar, intensive drill in pronunciation, comprehension, and speaking. Two hours language laboratory required weekly.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 1102 - INTRODUCTORY SPANISH II


    Continuation of SPA 1101, two hour language laboratory weekly.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 1101 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 2201 - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I


    Continuation of SPA 1102, grammar review.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 1102 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 2202 - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II


    Continuation of SPA 2201.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2201 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 2205 - PHONETICS AND PRONUNCIATION


    A study of the speech organs, place and manner of articulation of Spanish phonemes and their phonetic realizations, along with extensive practice exercise on pronunciation, intonation, stress and sentence rhythm. The numerous changes occurring in connected and rapid speech will be studied as well. Students will also be introduced to some Spanish dialects and regional pronunciation patterns.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 1102 or equivalent; SPA 2201 or higher is preferred.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 2225 - SPANISH GRAMMAR REVIEW


    SPA 2224 is a transition course between the intermediate and advanced level Spanish courses. It provides intensive Spanish grammar review and practice. It emphasizes the foundations of grammar and their expression in conversation, writing, and reading. In this course, students will increase their grammatical competency and command, as well as, work towards developing a more complex grammatical expression.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2201, SPA 2202 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Global Perspectives - Language other than English (Option 1),
    Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 3300 - SPANISH CONVERSATION


    Practice in oral self-expression and comprehension. Selected topics assigned for each class.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 3301 - CONVERSATION AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES


    SPA 3301 is an upper level conversation course designed to move students from intermediate to advanced level oral proficiency. All class activities will focus on contemporary Hispanic issues and will consist of individual/group presentations, debate, and discussion.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2201, SPA 2202 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 3306 - THE CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION OF SPAIN


    Examines the history of customs and institutions of Spain. Emphasizes the effect of history on general culture and customs of present-day Spain.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 3307 - THE CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION OF LATIN AMERICA


    Studies the history, customs and politics of Latin America. Emphasizes general characteristics: race, religion, life style, etc.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 3310 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES


    SPA 3310 in an introductory course in literary studies. In this course, students will read a diverse but representative collection of short Peninsular and Latin American literary texts, concentrating on their form, creation, context, and meaning. As a result, students will develop better reading, critical thinking, and evaluative skills.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or permission of instructor.

    Co-requisite - SPA 2225

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Information Literacy, Language and Literature

  
  • SPA 3320 - ADVANCED SPANISH STRUCTURE


    Study and application of Spanish structural patterns; emphasizes syntax.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 3351 - TOPICS IN THE LITERATURE OF SPAIN


    SPA 3351 is a Peninsular Literature course designed to enhance and refine the introductory literary skills gained in SPA 3310. As a topics course it will vary each semester in thematic focus. Nevertheless, one can expect to study in detail a particular era, writer, genre, or Peninsular literary phenomena. Some examples might include: The Medieval Text, Golden Age Theater, Cervantes, Becquer, The Realist versus Surrealist Text, The Works of Garcia Lorca, Literature of Exile, Feminist Voices in Spanish Literature, New Theater, or Avant-garde Movements.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 3310 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 3360 - TOPICS IN THE LITERATURE OF LATIN AMERICA


    SPA 3360 is a Latin American Literature course designed to enhance and refine the introductory literary skills gained in SPA 3310. As a topics course it will vary each semester in thematic focus. Nevertheless, one can expect to study in detail a particular area, writer, genre, or Latin American literary phenomena. Some examples might include: Latin American Parody, Journalism and Art Criticism in Latin America, the Avant-garde, Latin American Children’s Literature, Feminist Voices in Latin American Literature, or Experimental Urban Theater.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPA 3310 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPA 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time. General Education Requirement: Global Awareness, Language and Literature
  
  • SPE 1001 - FOUNDATIONS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION


    Examines the nature and need of persons who are exceptional in emotional, social, physical, and intellectual development.  Discussions will include key historical foundations, major legislation, laws and policies, identification procedures, placement options, current issues and trends in Special Education.  Observations in Special Education settings are required. 

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Professional Elective
  
  • SPE 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION


    Examines the nature and need of persons who are exceptional in emotional, social, physical, and intellectual development, including the gifted and talented. Discussions will include career opportunities, social issues, current trends in Special Education, rehabilitation and related settings. Observation in Special Education settings will be available.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Professional Elective
  
  • SPE 2276 - INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS


    This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers with the skills to provide linguistically and culturally appropriate instruction, assessment, and learning opportunities for students identified as English Language Learners (ELL).  We will examine current trends and issues in Second Language Acquisition (SLA), theoretical notions and research in the study of language acquisition, enculturation, acculturation, and cognitive development. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 2300 - INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING and DESIGN


    Teacher education candidates will examine the components of curriculum development, content and adjustments.  Students will develop knowledge and skills in goal development, instructional delivery options, and instructional planning for students in a variety of service delivery options.  In addition, student will review the purposes of assessment in the curriculum development and modification process.  Students will be required to interview a special education teacher and a special education administrator. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3270 - MENTALLY AND PHYSICALLY DISABLED


    Introduction to etiology, characteristics, education, management, and laws pertaining to children and adults with mental and physical disabilities.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1101 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3275 - INCLUSION OF DIVERSE LEARNERS


    This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to teach in schools which are becoming diverse. Issues, which include gender, social class, race, ethnicity, disabilities and religion, will be discussed. The teacher candidate will develop skills in teaching pedagogy, assessment curriculum development and teacher student relationships.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3280 - CHILDREN IN NEED OF EMOTIONAL SUPPORT


    Examines the etiology of emotional disturbance with concentration on the characteristics, diagnostic procedures, therapy, educational strategies, instructional materials, and relevant research in relation to the education of emotional/behavioral disturbance. Includes observation and child study experience.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3290 - LEARNING DISABILITIES


    Introduction to the definition, identification, etiology, and epidemiology of learning disabilities with a particular emphasis on methods of differential diagnosis and educational procedure. Remediation strategies, classroom management, and research will be studied.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3291 - HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES


    The focus of this course will be on the specific disabilities that are considered to be high incidence in the field of special education.  In relation to these disabilities, particular attention will be given to the causation, inclusion (including legislation and documentation), instruction (both in general and special education) with needed modifications, and evaluation of progress related to the IEP. Highlights will include development of adaptations and accommodations, literacy skills development, and cognitive skills development. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3300 - CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT & ADJUSTMENT


    Examines curriculum development, adjustments, methods, and materials in Special Education. Studies IEP goals, school organization, grouping, planning unit instruction, teaching-learning process, evaluating pupil progress, and parent and other agency relationships.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 3270 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3315 - LANGUAGE and COMMUNICATION DISORDERS


    Teacher education candidates will develop an understanding of language and communication, language and communication disorders and strategies for assessing, enhancing, addressing augmentative and alternative communication and using those strategies in the classroom for students with sensory, language and communication disorders.  A field component will be required - observation and interview. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3351 - BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT


    Studies the implications of behavior theory as classroom teaching techniques. Conditioning of both academic skills and non-academic behaviors on an individual and group is stressed. Direct experience in modifying the behavior of exceptional children will be arranged.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3352 - ASSESSMENT and EVIDENCE-BASED BEHAVIOR SUPPORT FOR INCLUSION


    This course is intended to expose students to three knowledge areas in order to facilitate inclusion: requirements in assessing the educational needs of children who may require special education services, awareness of social/emotional development and the skills required to establish a positive behavioral support classroom environment.  Both process (informal assessment) and product (formal assessment) will be considered.  For positive behavior support; functional assessment/functional analysis, antecedent control techniques and reinforcement will be emphasized. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3370 - EARLY CHILDHOOD DISABILITIES


    Examines the nature, needs, and education of young children with disabilities in infant-toddler, preschool, and primary programs. Emphasis will be on identification, multi-disciplinary educational planning, parent counseling, agencies, and services. Coverage will include special classes, resource rooms, and mainstream education including curriculum, methods, and materials plus the roles of other professionals. Observations and child studies are required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3380 - ASSESSMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION


    Provides students with the skills necessary to diagnose and correct learning problems. Special attention is given to considerations related to the selection of appropriate formal tests (e.g., test bias). Selective diagnostic instruments are examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • SPE 3390 - METHODS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MILD DISABILITIES


    Provides organizational procedures, curriculum practices, methods and techniques used in educating mildly handicapped students K-12 in need of academic learning support. Emphasis is on direct teaching, collaborative practices, transitional planning, and curriculum adaptation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1101 and SPE 3300.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 3400 - BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL: SCHOOL EXPERIENCES IN BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL


    A pre-student teaching intensive field experience course.  Students will demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions in pr-k-4th grade education.  Field experiences will be marked by attentions to candidate reflection, continuous learning, research-validated and ethical practices, advocacy for children knowledge and understanding of diversity, collaboration with others, adapting instruction to individual student learning differences, and commitment to professional standards and growth. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: ELE-2800 and 60 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ELE-3400 General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • SPE 3552 - ADVANCED EVIDENCE - BASED BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT


    This course content will rely heavily on evidence-based practices from the field of applied behavior analysis.  The strategies for addressing behavior concerns in the classroom will emphasize research-documented positive behavioral supports, including antecedent control techniques and discrimination training.  A tiered intervention approach will be presented to respond to the intensity of the behavioral concern.  Field application of the behavior principles will be arranged. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 4400 - STUDENT TEACHING


    (By arrangement). Opportunity to apply knowledge and skills acquired in professional preparation. Accomplished by a field experience under the supervision of master teachers in two different special classes in university established centers. Observations and conferences are scheduled by the departmental supervisor.

    Credits: 12 cr.
  
  • SPE 4400L - SENIOR LAB: BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL


    This lab is designed to develop and refine professional competencies prior to accepting a teaching position.  Topics include current issues; school organization, administration, and law; teacher certification issues; collective bargaining and unions; philosophies of teaching; seeking a professional position; and beginning a teaching career. 

    Credits: 0 cr.
  
  • SPE 4420 - OBSERVATION AND PARTICIPATION - SPECIAL ED


    Observation and participation in classroom setting. Emphasizing teaching/learning process, selecting, organizing, and presenting lessons and materials. Projects and demonstrations required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1101.  Co-requisites:  SPE 3351, ELE 3383 and ELE 3384.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • SPE 4430 - TECHNOLOGY IN SPECIAL EDUCATION


    Introduction and overview of the possibilities provided by microcomputers in assisting the exceptional learner. Provides initial skill and knowledge in using the microcomputer. Exposure will be made to available resources, selection and evaluation of course ware, adaptive devices, curriculum, correlation, and classroom integration.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 4440 - INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES


    Teacher education candidates will study the nature and needs of children with moderate to severe disabilities.  Focus will be on the educational and transitional needs of these candidates.  The teacher education candidates will develop knowledge and skills in identification, assessment, educational techniques and strategies which are coupled with supportive measures, materials and techniques.  Use instructional adaptations such as assistive technology will be stressed.  A field component will be required. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1101 and SPE 3300.

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
  • SPE 4445 - ADVANCED INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION


    This course provides an in-depth look at the assessment-instruction cycle and effective teaching-learning strategies that will benefit the learning of children with disabilities in the various service delivery options.  Students will develop assessment and remediation strategies to monitor children’s academic progress.  Field component required. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: SPE 1001 and SPE 2300.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SPE 4450 - INTERNSHIP


    A supervised field experience in a professional setting serving individuals with disabilities.

    Credits: 12 cr.
  
  • SPE 4460 - PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR


    Designed to develop and refine the professional competencies of the special education major prior to the field experience and/or accepting a professional position. Coverage includes general orientation to the profession, current issues, school organization and administration, techniques for seeking a professional position, the scope of the field of special education, and professional responsibilities.

    Credits: 2 cr.
  
  • SPE 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 - 3 credits at one time.
  
  • SWK 1500 - SOCIAL WORK AND POPULAR CULTURE USING MOVIES


    Analyzes the Social Work profession as portrayed in popular culture.  Popular culture will be explained and defined.  The most current theories will be used to give the courses context.  Several movies representing popular culture will be viewed in order to synthesize the theories as they are applied to Social Work.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 1800 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK


    Introduces students to the profession of Social Work. Provides an overview of social work by familiarizing the students with a generalist perspective and includes issues such as diversity, populations at risk, and the values and ethics of the profession. Examines the history of the profession, social welfare policies, economic justice, and human behavior theories that are related to social work practice.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 2246 - PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY AND PRE-PRACTICE EXPERIENCE


    Builds upon the basic knowledge, values and ethics learned in introductory course with a student initiation into Social Work practice.  Course components include: an overview of the program curriculum and degree requirements, content about professional values and behavior, and the application of communication techniques and basic helping skills that will ground students in generalist practice.  Analysis of the ethical principles of the National Association of Social Workers will engage students in ethical-decision making.  Exploration of the dynamic context of practice requires the completion of a 30-hour shadow observation in a social work setting.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 2249 - PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS


    Familiarizes students with the use of communication skills in professional social work, including written, verbal, and non-verbal communication. Exposes students to APA style writing, library resources, and an introduction to verbal and non-verbal communication with clients. Requires the completion of an early field education experience.

    Credits: 1 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • SWK 2500 - DIVERSITY IN AMERICAN SOCIAL WELFARE


    Examines the history and evolution of social welfare, the social work profession, and social movements that led to the formation of social welfare laws and services.  There is a strong focus on diversity and at risk populations through exploring the factors that may oppress, marginalize, and discriminate these populations.  This course recognized and communicates the importance of personal life experiences in understanding power and privilege of diverse groups in the formation of social welfare.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 3300 - HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT


    Focuses on the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments. Includes empirically based theories and knowledge that focus on the interactions between and among individuals, groups, societies, and economic systems. Includes theories and knowledge of biological, sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development across the life span; the range of social systems in which people live (individual, family, group, organizational, and community); and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 3301 - HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I


    The course focuses on the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments prenatally to young adulthood.  It includes empirically based theories and knowledge that analyzes interactions between and among individuals, groups, societies, and economic systems through assessment, intervention and evaluation.  It critiques theories and knowledge of biological, sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development; and the ways social systems promoted or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
  • SWK 3302 - HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II


    The course focuses on the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments from young adulthood to death.  It includes empirically based theories and knowledge that analyzes interactions between and among individuals, groups, societies, and economic systems through assessment, intervention and evaluation.  It critiques theories and knowledge of biological, sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development; and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes: 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
  • SWK 3308 - EVALUATION RESEARCH


    Provides an understanding of a scientific, analytic, and ethical approach to building knowledge for social work practice through qualitative and quantitative research content. Prepares students to develop, use, and effectively communicate empirically based knowledge and critical thinking skills, including evidence-based interventions.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Information Literacy
  
  • SWK 3315 - EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL WELFARE IN AMERICA


    Analyzes the history and evolution of social welfare services, the history of social work and major policies that form the foundation of social welfare. Includes the impact of social welfare on populations at risk and examines factors that contribute to and constitute being at risk. Provides knowledge of distributive justice, human and civil rights, and the global interconnections of oppression.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 3320 - GERONTOLOGY


    Provides students from a variety of careers (such as social work and psychology) with an introduction to gerontology. Emphasizes a person-in-environment perspective to interacting with older persons and includes a practice-based component. Provides an opportunity for students to practice interaction skills with older persons. Offers current implications of aging in our complex, and increasingly older, modern society.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SOC 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 3321 - CHILD WELFARE


    Introduces students to the field of child welfare in social work. Students will explore issues affecting the lives of children in the United States and current services developed to meet children’s needs. The course is taught from a systems, strengths-based perspective.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 3322 - INTRODUCTION TO TRAUMA IN SOCIAL WORK


    Introduces students to the issue of trauma and trauma treatment at both an individual and systems level.  Emphasis is placed upon the variety of variables which both contribute to and are impacted by trauma.  Analysis of key factors such as psychobiology, central nervous system involvement, impact and implication on intra psychic functioning, attachment and bonding, as well exploration and discussion around dynamics such as hyper vigilance, hyper arousal, re-enactment, repetition compulsion, flashbacks, intrusive thoughts, and disassociation will be explored at length.  Students will be trained in an “iinjury” model of assessment and treatment, with an emphasis on expanding the ability to think critically relative to these core functions, and the range of evidenced based interventions be introduced, from which students will learn to integrate the various models and apply theory to practice.  The issue of ethics in treatment will be interwoven throughout, as well as the principle and practice of self-care for the worker.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SWK 1800 and 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 3323 - LEADERSHIP IN SOCIAL WORK


    Analyzes the variety of leadership roles available within the social work industry, with emphasis being placed upon leadership in the private, not-for-profit sector.  Various models of leadership and leadership theory will be introduced, and students will examine the unique role social work leaders play in the human service field and differentiate this from leadership in other venues.  Critical analysis and didactic learning around such key factors as strategic planning, supervision, human resource management, and fiscal planning will be addressed, as well as the ethical considerations and implications inherent in leadership in Social Work.

    Prerequisites & Notes: SWK 1800 and 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  • SWK 3324 - SOCIAL WORK AND HEALTH CARE


    Focuses on the application of social work in a variety of health care settings and is designed to develop a beginning knowledge of: medical terminology, physiology, health care systems and insurance issues, community factors, the effect of illness and disease on the patient and family members, cultural and ethical issues.  Critical practice issues considered will include theories of health behaviors, patient’s rights, assessment and intervention, religion, sexuality and social problems that affect health care.  Class activities, group exercises and case studies will encourage students to exhibit skills of problem-solving and effective communication with both clients and other members of the health care team.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes: SWK 1800 and 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
 

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