Aug 16, 2022  
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    GEOS 1625 - SURFACE HYDROLOGY


    Surface hydrology is an introduction to physical and applied hydrology and explores the components of the hydrologic cycle including processes of precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, infiltration, ground-water flow, surface runoff and streamflow. Students learn about each physical hydrologic process, and then are introduced to both field and modeling methods to measure and estimate rates of each process and how the results are applied in real-world situations.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GEOS 2821 - MAP READING AND INTERPRETATION


    Studies the interpretation of maps. Topics include: location systems, scale, contour lines, projections, introductory surveying techniques and basic photogrammetry.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    GEOS 2855 - WETLAND SCIENCE


    This course will discuss wetland indicators including plants, soils and wetland hydrology in the soil or on the surface of wetlands. The course will help an individual interested in wetland delineation, along with teaching the importance and protection of wetland environments. Topics include wetland classification and delineation, origin and development of wetlands, biotic adaptions to the wetland environment, wetland chemistry and microbial communities, and wetland restoration.  The course will include lecture, labs, applied activities and field trips.

    Credits: 3cr
  
  •  

    GEOS 2880 - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


    This course will present land use management, with a primary emphasis on describing and explaining approaches, methods, and techniques for sustainable land use. Students will investigate the methods and tools by which local, state, and federal governments control the use of land and will put these to work by conducting a federal Environmental Impact Assessment of a local site.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    GEOS 3020 - PRACTICUM


    An out-of-class learning experience that allows students to observe or participate in applied work. Practicums are grades S or U - they do not affect GPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 earned credits and Instructor permission.

    Variable Credits: 1-5cr.
  
  •  

    GEOS 3060 - PRINCIPLES OF SOIL SCIENCE


    A survey course that examines the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils. Relationships between soils and plant growth, land use, watershed management, water pollution, and environmental protection form an integral part of the course.  Field work is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 Earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    GEOS 3105 - ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING


    This course will focus on environmental permitting. It will introduce General Permits, NPDES permits, E&S plans, and water obstruction and encroachment permits (section 401 and 404 permits). Students will complete fieldwork and the appropriate forms and supporting materials associated with the permitting process.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take GEOS-2855.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GEOS 3312 - CLIMATE CHANGE


    This course aims to familiarize students with the basic scientific and historical background needed to understand the causes and consequences of climate change, and proposed adaptation and mitigation options. Topics include the nature of energy and fossil fuels, weather and climate, the greenhouse effect, forcing and feedbacks, climate change in the geological and archaeological records, climate model projections and uncertainties, and the environmental consequences of unchecked global warming. This includes an examination of the prevalent methods utilized to determine climate change such as dendrochronology, palynology, and sediment, ice core, and borehole analysis. The course also explores the costs and benefits of a range of proposed solutions, which include: renewable energy and carbon sequestration, increased efficiency of energy use, carbon regulation, and new technologies.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 Earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    GEOS 3321 - GEOMORPHOLOGY


    Studies how landforms develop and change. Surveys the major landform regions and national parks of the United States. Interpretation of aerial photographs is an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: GEL-1125 & GEL-1125L.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    GEOS 3340 - INTRODUCTION TO GEOARCHAEOLOGY


    Geoarchaeology is the application of earth science methods and concepts to address archaeological research questions. This course introduces students to the application of Geoscience disciplines such as soils, geomorphology, sediments, stratigraphy, and geochemistry specifically within the context of past human settlement patterns, and the reconstruction of ancient landscapes and paleoclimates. The course includes a laboratory/field component and students will be provided with opportunities to apply practical skills discussed in class, including but not limited to: soil description, sampling, and analysis; geomorphological landscape analysis, and stratigraphic description and analysis.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 30 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GEOS 3430 - REMOTE SENSING


    This course is an introduction to remote sensing and focuses on the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of digital and photographic imagery.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: GEG-2200 and GEG-2200L.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    GEOS 3440 - GEOPHYSICAL METHODS


    This course introduces students to the science that underpins the most commonly used near-surface geophysical survey methods and provides experience in hands-on application of ground penetrating radar (GPR). Near-surface geophysical investigations are used in a variety of disciplines, including but not limited to geology, hydrogeology, mining, engineering, geomorphology, and archaeology. This course focuses on the use of geophysical methods on geomorphology and archaeology. This course focuses on the use of geophysical methods in geomorphology and archaeology.  For the purposes of this course, students will a) study the scientific underpinnings of a variety of geophysical methods, and b) learn how to collect, analyze, and process near surface geophysical data to investigate geomorphological and/or archaeological problems. This course is a requirement for the Geoarchaeology concentration buy may also be of interest to students studying environmental science or physics.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 30 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GEOS 4415 - APPLICATIONS IN GEOSCIENCES


    Offers extensive field experience and the opportunity to observe, first-hand, a variety of natural and human processes and phenomena.  May be taken for two through four credits.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Instructor permission; 45 earned credits.

    Variable Credits: 2-4cr.
  
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    GEOS 4440 - GEOSCIENCE RESEARCH


    Research laboratory for advanced geoscience students to learn the conduct of original research under faculty guidance. Topics include construction of a research question, use of various geoscience research methods, and appropriate sharing of results.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Instructor permission; 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    GEOS 4496 - INTERNSHIP


    Offers practical work experience and the opportunity to apply and further develop skills taught in the Geosciences Department. All internships will be grades S or U -they do not affect your GPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Instructor permission.

    Variable Credits: 6-12cr.
  
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    GEOS 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline.  The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field. May be taken for one, two or three credits at one time.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 45 Earned credits.

    Variable Credits: 1-3cr.
  
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    GEOS 4500 - SENIOR SEMINAR


    A capstone course for Geography majors.  A research project and job search, to include compiling a vita and writing a cover letter for an actual job, are integral parts of the course.

    Credits: 1cr.
  
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    GER 1101 - INTRODUCTORY GERMAN I


    For beginning students and those with less than two years of high school German who wish to review their knowledge starting from the very beginning. Students will learn the most basic communicative skills and will be able to greet people, give personal information, and otherwise form simple sentences and ask questions. Skills are all taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required weekly.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 1102 - INTRODUCTORY GERMAN II


    Continuation of 1101. This course is appropriate for students who have had 1 or 2 years of high school German. Students will strengthen skills in all areas and should be able to survive in a German-speaking environment at a minimum level by the end of the course. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required weekly.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GER 1101 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 2201 - INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I


    A review and expansion of topics involving cultural competence and the structure of the German language with additional emphasis on listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Particular attention is given to vocabulary development. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required. The course is appropriate for those with 2-3 years of high school German or equivalent.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GER 1102 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 2202 - INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II


    Increased emphasis on the development of language skills, using materials taken from current events and cultural and literary selections. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required. The course is appropriate for those with 3-4 years of high school German.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GER 2201 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 2205 - PHONETICS AND PRONUNCIATION


    A study of the speech organs and of the place and manner of articulation of German phonemes and their phonetic realizations, along with extensive practice exercises on pronunciation, intonation, stress and sentence rhythm. The numerous changes occurring in connected and rapid speech will be studied as well. Students will also be introduced to major German dialect groups.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GER 1102 or equivalent; GER 2201 or higher preferred.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 3300 - CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN


    Intensive oral practice in German for the development of a higher degree of fluency in the spoken language. Emphasis on topics of cultural, social, economic, and political nature.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GER 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 3305 - ADVANCED GERMAN CONVERSATION


    Intensive development of oral expression for students desiring a higher level of oral fluency. Emphasis is on enabling the student to carry on discussion in more detail and giving oral reports.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GER 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 3320 - ADVANCED GERMAN STRUCTURE


    Study and practical application of the German structural patterns with concentration on the morphology and syntax of the language.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GER 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 3330 - INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE


    This course will examine both the main literary movements from the 1 9th century to the present as well as the major authors representing them. Students will read selections from many of these authors’ works and discuss them in their historical context. The course also aims to familiarize students with methods of literary analysis.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GER 2202 or equivalent. One previous GER 3000 level course recommended.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 3335 - DEUTSCHE LANDESKUNDE


    Students will become acquainted with the political, educational, and economic makeup of modern Germany, including special problems of the German reunification. Contemporary German culture will also be examined in its context within society as a whole. In addition, practical aspects of everyday German life (public transportation, mail system, social behavior, etc.) are covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GER 2202 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 3336 - PROSEMINAR: LAENDER UND STAEDTE


    Emphasis is on the cultural, economic, and social significance of each major geographical region along with main cities and tourist destinations in each. Students will also prepare individual presentations on an area that interests them.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    GER 3337 - PROSEMINAR: TWENTIETH CENTURY GERMAN LITERATURE


    Major literary movements along with works or selections of works by representative authors will be the focus of this course. Techniques and terminology of literary analysis will be covered. Students will prepare a research project on a particular author, genre, or movement.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    GER 3360 - SEMINAR: GERMAN CULTURAL HISTORY


    Survey of the cultural development of the German-speaking areas from the tribal migration period through the recent reunification. Emphasis is on literary, architectural, musical, scientific, and artistic achievements of each period and how these interact. Students will prepare several brief presentations and an in-depth project.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 3363 - SEMINAR: THE GERMAN NOVELLE


    This is a genre-study course that concentrates on the Novelle (longer short story or novelette) as it developed in the German-speaking countries. Authors studied are from the 19th and early 20th centuries, covering romanticism to realism.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GER 3370 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    “Strongly recommended for all German majors - especially those in the BSE program or who plan to pursue graduate work, but open to students of any major who wish to live and study in Germany.” The number of credits granted is based upon validated credentials presented to the department. Plans for foreign study should be submitted at least one semester prior to departure. Regulations regarding study abroad are available in the Office of the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    GER 3371 - FOREIGN STUDY - CREDIT ARRANGED


    See GER 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    GER 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
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    GRA 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN


    This course offers a survey of the tools that graphic designers use in both print and motion graphics.  The goals of this course are to provide instruction on current trends in graphic design\ and experience in hands-on utilization of tools appropriate to the discipline.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GRA 1102 - HST OF GRAPHIC DESIGN


    This course offers a survey of the development of the field of graphic design from its beginnings to current practices in both print and electronic form.  The goals of this course are to provide instruction and experience in:  historical development of the field of graphic design; visual identity.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GRA 2200 - FOUNDATIONS IN DIGITAL MEDIA


    A foundation course in understanding the hardware, software, methodologies and techniques involved in digital illustration and imaging.  This course introduces the terms, applications, and skills necessary for all upper level computer generated art and design work.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GRA 2201 - COMPUTER GRAPHICS I


    This introductory course is designed to offer instruction on the basic concepts and terminology of the application of 2-D and basic 3-D computer graphics in visual communication.  Concentration is on visualization, design and digital techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GRA 1101.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GRA 3202 - VISUAL COMMUNICATION AND DESIGN


    This course introduces students to the theory and process of graphic design, including the study of image, typography, grid structure, color, visual perception, language, and hierarchy of information.  Conceptual and applied problem-solving projects will develop an understanding of the media, techniques, and processes used within the discipline of graphic design.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take GRA-2200.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GRA 3203 - HISTORY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN


    This course offers a survey of the development of the field of graphic design, from its inception to current practices.  The goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive view of graphic design as it has been inherently woven into our lives through industry, religion, history, economy, and culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 15 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GRA 3302 - INTERACTIVE DESIGN


    A comprehensive survey of the history, theory, media and techniques used within interactive design. Students receive an introductory approach to basic concepts, terminology, design, and software applicable to animation and motion graphics.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GRA 2202.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GRA 3303 - DESIGN THEORY AND PRACTICE


    Topics and presentations in the contemporary practice of print, exhibition, and time-based graphic design work will be offered. Presentations will cover survey of contemporary designers and related historic movements. Students will produce a semester-long directed project incorporating elements of print, installation, sound, video, and/or interactive media suitable for their portfolio. Class will culminate in a student-managed exhibition of the work at the end of the semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take GRA 2202 and 30 earned credits.  Restricted to Graphic Design major or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GRA 3304 - MOVING IMAGE AND SOUND


    The course surveys the history and theory of design work that utilizes moving image and sound relationships to connect with the emotional and rational realm of the viewer in a graphic design context. Students will learn the software tools and techniques necessary to produce well-designed sound and video projects. Course outcomes include narrative and non-narrative montage, experimental, non-representational, linear or interactive projects targeted for electronic distribution or site-specific installation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take GRA-2202. Restricted to Graphic Design major or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GRA 3342 - DESIGN AND ADVERTISING


    A comprehensive survey of basic principles and practices in graphic design and advertising, as well as their relationship to economy, society, and system of mass communication.  Psychological and creative factors, as well as the visual and verbal relationships involved in design, advertising, campaign, media and research are explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take GRA-3202

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    GRA 3350 - TYPOGRAPHY


    This course focuses on fundamental typographic structure within graphic design, including meaning, hierarchy, context and theme, grid structure, image-type relationships, interaction, and typographic history and expression.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GRA 3202.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GRA 3365 - DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION


    Introduction to the methods, techniques, and approaches to using the computer as a tool for visual communication.  This course provides conceptual strategies and effective, workable knowledge of software programs that can be applied to the area of creative expression and teaching.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take GRA-2200.

    Variable Credits: 1-6crs
  
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    GRA 4402 - ADVANCED INTERACTIVE DESIGN


    An in-depth study of the history, theory, media and techniques used within interactive design. Students investigate complex concepts, terminology, design, and as software, applicable to animation and motion graphics, in concert with projects that are specific to personal area of interest.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GRA 3302.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GRA 4403 - SENIOR SEMINAR PROJECT


    Senior Seminar Project focuses on advanced theory and application in preparation for professional practice. Students will define and develop content for projects, including research and critical analysis. This course will provide the opportunity for students to identify personal and professional goals, including the development of their resume, portfolio, and final exhibition or presentation of work.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take 90-105 credits by semester preceding Senior Seminar project; including 33 core major credits; have a 2.75 overall GPA; and approval of seminar proposal by department at the time of application.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GRA 4404 - BRANDING AND IDENTITY


    This course will focus on the history, methodology, and application of brand strategy, as well as visual and verbal brand development, and the role of design in creating brand essence, distinction, and identity. Through conceptual and applied projects, the components of successful, integrated brands will be explored. The course will culminate with the creation of an identity program that include name development, nomenclature systems, visual imagery and verbal language that reflects the essence and message of the brand.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GRA 2202 and GRA 3350.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GRA 4405 - GRAPHIC DESIGN PRACTICUM


    This course would provide an opportunity, through an experience-based project, for students to act and reflect upon their role as graphic designers and visual communicators within a community. The student will take part in a supervised and evaluated experience in varied settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Earned 90 credits by the semester preceding the practicum; including all 33 core major credits; have a 2.75 overall GPA; and approval of practicum proposal by department at the time of application.

    Credits: 1 - 5 cr.
  
  •  

    GRA 4410 - GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERNSHIP


    This course is designed to offer students practical understanding of graphic design techniques in the workplace environment.  The student will take part in a supervised and evaluated experience in varied settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Earned 90 credits by the semester preceding the internship, including all 33 core major credits; have a 2.75 overall GPA; and approval on internship proposal, by Department at the time of application.

    Credits: 6 - 15 cr.
  
  •  

    GRA 4450 - ADVANCED TYPOGRAPHY


    This course focuses on advanced-level use of typography within graphic design, with specific focus on experimental techniques, semiotics, hierarchy, context and theme, and complex interactions within a form.

    Prerequisites & Notes: GRA 3350.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    GRA 4465 - ADVANCED DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION


    An advanced course in the methods, techniques, and approaches to using traditional hand processes, together with the computer, as a tool for visual communication.  This course provides advanced conceptual and applied knowledge, to solve complex problems, which can be applied to the area of creative expression and teaching.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take GRA-3365

    Variable Credits: 1-6crs
  
  •  

    HON 1107 - MACRO PHYSICAL SCIENCE


    An introduction to motion and energy, astronomy thermodynamics, and sound. Students will construct laboratory apparatus from readily available sources to make measurements. Regularly cross-listed with SCI 1107.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HON 1108 - MICROPHYSICAL SCIENCE


    An introduction to the atom, chemistry, electricity and magnetism, and light. Students will construct laboratory apparatus from readily available sources to make physical measurements. Regularly cross-listed with SCI 1108. Honors Students take only one Honors science course, either HON 1107 or HON 1108.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HON 1111 - HUMANITIES HONORS I


    Introduction to the humanities by means of an interdisciplinary content drawn from literature, philosophy, theater, music, art and history.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HON 1112 - HUMANITIES HONORS II


    A study of the structure and significance of artworks through classics selected from the period beginning with the Renaissance and extending to contemporary times.  Emphasis is on understanding how artworks convey meaning through the use of representational, symbolic or formal aspects of the medium.  Selections will derive mainly from European or American sources, although non-Western works may also be included when feasible.  Works may be drawn from one or several media (such as narrative literature, visual art, music, drama or film) and from diverse cultural periods within the overall historical time frame.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HON 2200 - RESEARCHING CONTEMPORARY ISSUES


    This course focuses on a series of case studies drawn from recent events of local, national and international importance with an emphasis on interdisciplinary research methods.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HON 2500 - WHY BECOME EDUCATED?


    This course explores the nature and purpose of a liberal arts education. Questions in this course may include: What is “education?” what is its function or purpose? What are the instrumental and intrinsic values of education? Is there a difference between education and training? What are the relationships between education, happiness, and success? What does it mean to be “liberally educated?” Ought the professional and liberal arts disciplines remain separate from each other, or should they be integrated with each other? Are science, technology, engineering, and mathematics more important than humanities and the arts? Why are some people willing to die for their education? 

    Prerequisites & Notes: Only HON status or instructor permission.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    HON 3001 - HOW DO WE KNOW?


    This course explores the processes of inquiry that humans have developed to understand reality. Questions examined in this course may include: What does it mean to “know?”  What constitutes evidence and validity? What is the relationship between theory and observation? Is social science inquiry different from natural science inquiry? How does knowledge in humanities differ from scientific ways of knowing? What are some of the great scientific revolutions and why are they so significant?

    Prerequisites & Notes: Honor status, 30 earned credits, or professor permission.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    HON 3002 - ARE WE FREE?


    Are we truly free to think, make choices, and act as we wish, or are we limited by, even determined by, the complexities of our physical, social and historical contexts? Questions examined in this course may include: What do we mean by “free?” Do we have too much freedom, or not enough? What is the relationship between freedom and inequality? Is freedom free or is there a cost to freedom? What is the relationship between freedom and responsibility?

    Prerequisites & Notes: Honor status, 30 earned credits, or professor permission.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    HON 3003 - ARE WE PROGRESSING?


    This course explores the ways in which we conceptualize and measure progress.  Questions examined in the course may include: What is “progress?” Is progress necessary? What is the relationship between progress and happiness? What is the role of innovation in progress? How might ideologies affect and be affected by progress? To what extent is progress influenced by economics? When is too much progress, too much?

    Prerequisites & Notes: Honor status, 30 earned credits, or professor permission.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    HON 3004 - WHY DO SOCIETIES RISE & FALL?


    This course explores the reasons why and ways in which societies rise and decline, from ancient times to the present. Questions examined in the course may include: What defines “society?” What causes some societies to dominate? Why do others fail? What roles do science, religion, and ideology play? Is the US an empire in decline while China an empire on the rise?

    Prerequisites & Notes: Honor status, 30 earned credits, or professor permission.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    HON 3005 - WHAT IS FAIR?


    This course explores the reasons why and ways in which situations of injustice arise. Questions examined in the course may include: What are the causes and consequences of prejudice? How do we conceptualize fairness, equality, and justice? Why is there an inherent social categorization, an “us v. them” mentality? Can literature serve as a vehicle for social change? What does it mean to be invisible? What constitutes “privilege?” Who decides what constitutes social justice?  How can we increase awareness of social injustice? What are our personal and collective responsibilities to affect positive change in eradicating social injustices?

    Prerequisites & Notes: Honor status, 30 earned credits, or professor permission.

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    HON 4000 - HONORS CO-CURRICULAR EXPERIENCES


    HONORS CO-CURRICULAR EXPERIENCE. S/U for grade.

    Notes: Honors students only.
  
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    HON 4495 - HONORS SENIOR PROJECT SEMINAR


    To be taken in conjunction with (or the semester before, if necessary) the Honors Senior Project (HON 4497) to assist students in effectively presenting the findings f their projects.  Students will create project outlines, study citation methods, improve their presentation skills, and receive feedback from their classmates and their instructor.  Specific attention will be paid to creating engaging and interactive presentations and examining various off-campus and non-traditional venues in which to present student findings.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HON 4497 - SENIOR RESEARCH PRESENTATION


    A semester-long project, related to the students major, that involves the perspective of at least two academic disciplines. The project is supervised by a faculty member of the student’s choosing and approved by the Honors Program Director. A formal presentation before the campus community concludes the Honors Program.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HON 4500 - HONORS CAPSTONE


    Capstone project for the Honors Program.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 90 credits completed; HON status, or instructor permission.

    Credits: 0cr Notes: It is a 0-credit course based on an S/U grade.
  
  •  

    HPE 1102 - BEGINNING BOWLING


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    HPE 1106 - BEGINNING ARCHERY


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1108 - BEGINNING RACQUETS


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1110 - BEGINNING GOLF


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1115 - CONDITION AND BODY AWARENESS


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    HPE 1117 - BADMINTON AND RACQUETBALL


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    HPE 1118 - RACQUETBALL


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1122 - CONDITION AND WEIGHT TRAINING


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    HPE 1128 - AEROBIC CONDITIONING


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1129 - ARCHERY


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1131 - WALK LIFE FITNESS


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1135 - TENNIS AND RACQUETS


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1140 - RACQUETS


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1146 - INTERMEDIATE BOWLING


    Serves the individual with little or no experience in the activity selected. Emphasis on beginner-level fundamental skills in lifetime fitness, leisure, and recreational activities.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1165 - HIKING


    Designed to cover the broad scope of activities concerned with hiking, compass use and orienting. Emphasis will be placed upon safety, equipment, and traversing various trails in Tioga County. Participation in weekend sessions is required.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1168 - BLS FOR HLTH CARE PROVIDERS


    This course is designed to teach the skills of CPR for victims of all ages (including ventilation with a barrier device, bag-mask device, and oxygen), use of automated external defibrillator (AED), and relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (FBAO), as prescribed by the American Heart Association. It is intended for students who, by nature of their professions, provide health care to patients and victims in a wide variety of situations, including in-hospital and out-of-hospital settings. The course is also designed for anyone required to take a healthcare/professional rescuer course for future employment. This course is a prerequisite for those seeking future certification in ACLS and PALS.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 1200 - PERSONAL and COMMUNITY HEALTH


    Includes health services, health instruction, and  health environment dealing with contemporary principles, practices, and concepts serving personal, family, and community health.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Unity and Diversity of Humanity – Themes - Environmental, Economic, Social and Personal Sustainability,
    Wellness
  
  •  

    HPE 3315 - ATHLETIC TRAINING


    Designed to provide experience in the application of various methods of treatment to athletic injuries. A study of preventive measures and medical management of athletic injuries.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 3340 - FIRST AID and CPR


    Theory, scientific basis, and methods are used in the application of first aid and CPR skills.  This course will stress BLS-CPR (professional rescuer) and use of and A.E.D. for situations within 1 hour of definitive health care.  The student will receive certifications in Adult, Child, and Infant CPR, Adult and Pediatric First Aid, and Adult and Child AED through the American Heart Association.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
  •  

    HPE 3345 - WILDERNESS FIRST AID / CPR


    Wilderness First Aid and CPR is designed to meet the needs of all students who participate in activities in remote areas (more than 1 hour from definitive medical care).  Emphasis is placed on victim assessment and care, emergency action and extrication, CPR, and transportation. 

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 3353 - FIRST AID AND CPR INSTRUCTOR


    This course is designed to prepare the student to become a certified First Aid and CPR Instructor as per the requirements of the American Heart Association. Upon successful completion the student will be recertified in the latest CPR and First Aid techniques, and will meet all the necessary standards to be classified as “Instructor” by the American Heart Association.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 3360 - KINESIOLOGY


    Analysis of human motion based on anatomical and mechanical principles. Applications of mechanics to sports activity.

    Prerequisites & Notes: BSC 1121.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 3370 - PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE


    Critical analysis of physiological bases of muscular activity with special attention to general effects of exercise on body function.

    Prerequisites & Notes: BSC 1122 and HPE 3360.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HPE 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
  •  

    HST 1111 - WORLD CIVILIZATION TO 1350


    A survey of significant ideas, events, and cultural developments from the emergence of ancient Civilizations to 1 350.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 1112 - WORLD CIVILIZATION 1350-1900


    A continuation of HST 1111, beginning with the Renaissance to the close of the nineteenth century, including the political, economic, and social developments that affected the world.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 1113 - WORLD HISTORY SINCE 1900


    A survey of the cultural, political, economic, and social forces that have shaped world history since 1 900, with particular emphasis on global historical trends.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 2201 - UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1877


    A survey of American history covering pre-European contact through colonization, independence, and the formation of the new republic; nationalism, sectionalism, and the growth of democracy in the 19th century; and the Civil War and Reconstruction.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 2202 - UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1877


    A continuation of 2201, covering significant trends and events in the rise of modern industrial America, its emergence as a world power and events into the 21st century.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 2210 - AMERICAN WOMEN’S HISTORY


    Explores the cultural, social, racial, and political forces that have shaped the experiences of women throughout American history.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 2216 - HISTORY OF NON-WESTERN CIVILIZATION


    A survey history of Non-Western societies that explores the cultural and political developments of countries in Asia and Africa. 

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 2220 - WORLD WAR II


    The origin, background, and course of World War II and its effects upon world affairs. Deals with battles and the scientific, psychological, political, and economic impact of the war.

    Credits: 3 cr.
 

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