Jan 22, 2022  
Mansfield University 2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    HST 2202 - UNITED STATES HISTORY SINCE 1877


    A continuation of 2201, covering significant trends and events in the rise of modern industrial America, its emergence as a world power and events into the 21st century.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 2210 - AMERICAN WOMEN’S HISTORY


    Explores the cultural, social, racial, and political forces that have shaped the experiences of women throughout American history.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 2216 - HISTORY OF NON-WESTERN CIVILIZATION


    A survey history of Non-Western societies that explores the cultural and political developments of countries in Asia and Africa. 

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 2220 - WORLD WAR II


    The origin, background, and course of World War II and its effects upon world affairs. Deals with battles and the scientific, psychological, political, and economic impact of the war.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 2226 - FILM AS HISTORY


    Explores how the cinema, the 20th century’s most important mass medium, has portrayed and presented history on the screen. We view various feature films with historical topics and then analyze how these films present history to their audiences. We look into not only questions of visual representation, but also the problem of factual accuracy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 2230 - HISTORY OF SEXUALITY


    This course examines the social constructs of sexuality, sexual orientation, gender and gender identification from a historical perspective.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3265 - HISTORY OF SPORTS IN AMERICAN SOCIETY


    Topics include: evolution of major sports, influence of organization and technology, critics of sports, racism, role of women and labor relations within sports, sports in the school, various sports heroes, and sports and culture.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3266 - HISTORY OF BASEBALL


    This course will examine the history of baseball from its origins during the colonial period into the 21st century.   Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between baseball and American culture, including the sport’s ethnic and working class roots, the changing nature of leisure and recreation, business consolidation, gender and race relations, labor-management conflict, and the importance of the community in everyday society.  Offered online during summer sessions.    

    Prerequisites & Notes: One history course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 3271 - AMERICAN REVOLUTION ON FILM


    This course will focus upon film portrayals of the American Revolution form the early twentieth century to the present.  Feature films and televisions movies will be used to examine the historical accuracy of these media as they interpret American history from the 1760s into the 1780s.  Offered online during summer sessions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3272 - AMERICAN WOMEN’S HISTORY ON FILM


    This course will focus upon film portrayals of American women’s history from colonial times to the present. Feature films and television movies, along with documentaries, will be used to evaluate the historical accuracy of these media as they interpret American women’s history.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    HST 3273 - HISTORY OF MEDICINE


    A history of medicine in Western and non-Western society from the Ancient world to the twenty-first century. This course will take a global approach to explore the development of medicine over time in various cultures. This course will also examine the relationship between medicine and historical themes, such as the Enlightenment, Scientific Revolution, Industrialization, production and consumption.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    HST 3275 - HISTORY OF SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA


    Historical study of the peoples of South and Southeast Asian countries from ancient to the present. Also covers the indigenous religions of the region. Includes the Indian subcontinent and SE Asian countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ANH 3333.
  
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    HST 3290 - HISTORICAL METHODS


    Introduces the student to the discipline, methods, and techniques of historical research and writing. Examines the major interpretations of history.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 3294 - TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY


    A special area of American history that is of current interest.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 3295 - TOPICS IN GLOBAL HISTORY


    A special area of world history that is of current interest.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3296 - TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY


    A special area of European history that is of current interest.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ANH 3296.
  
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    HST 3301 - HISTORY OF COLONIAL AMERICA TO 1763


    A study of the colonial foundations of the American heritage from the earliest beginnings to the reorganization of the British imperial administration in the 1760’s. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: 45 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3302 - HISTORY OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC 1789 - 1848


    This course will provide a basis for understanding the development and expansion of the new nation. Topics covered will include the rise of democracy, economic and social development, territorial expansion, and foreign affairs. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: HST 2201 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3303 - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 1763-1789


    The primary purpose of this course is to explore the history of the American Revolution from the end of the French & Indian War in 1763 through the ratification of the United States constitution in 1788.  Particular attention will be paid to the social, economic, and political aspects of the conflict. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: HST 2201 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3307 - CONTEMPORARY AMERICA


    Explores the social, cultural, and economic changes of America since World War II. Examines the rise of suburbia, civil rights, counterculture, and development of the post-industrial economy.

    Prerequisites & Notes: One history course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3308 - RISE OF INDUSTRIAL AMERICA, 1877-1945


    Study of the growth of big businesses and influential figures of corporate America. Also addresses the political and social implications on American society.

    Prerequisites & Notes: One history course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3313 - WOMEN IN EUROPEAN HISTORY


    Explores the experiences of women in Europe from the fall of Rome to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on the changing legal and social status of women throughout the period.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3316 - TEACHING SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES


    This course provides a thorough background in the methods and materials for the teaching of social studies.  Emphasis is placed on self-directed inquiry that focuses on identifying issues, problems, and contexts and on methods to incorporate this knowledge and these skills into classroom instruction.  Students will have an opportunity to plan and implement practice strategies in a classroom setting.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ED 1102 or ED 1110 and must be a teacher education candidate.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3320 - HISTORY OF AMERICAN TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENT


    Study of the American landscape and its inhabitants. Role of technology in American society and its impact on the environment. Environmental thought and issues on the changing landscape. Implications of population growth, technology, industries, and development on the American economy and society.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: One history course or approval of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3325 - HISTORY OF WITCHES AND WITCH HUNTS


    This course explores one of the darkest periods in history, the witch hunts which occurred in Europe and Salem in the early modern period. The course focuses on the intellectual, economic, and social forces which allowed people to believe in witches and to accuse their family members and neighbors of witchcraft. The course also addresses issues of gender and their impact on the witch hunts both in Europe and Salem.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3326 - HISTORY OF WOMEN AND TELEVISION


    Through a study of both former and present television program, this course explores the changing roles of American women. We will consider how television both reflects and influences the culture understanding of gender in our society. The course will include discussions from a historical perspective on the impact of women in the workplace, the women’s movement and its backlash. The importance of these events and their reflection in television programs throughout the television age will be discussed.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3330 - ROME: FROM REPUBLIC TO EMPIRE


    Traces the history of Rome from the founding of the Roman Republic in the 5th century B.C. to the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 A.D. Particular emphasis is placed on cultural and political trends during the late Republic and early Empire.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: One history course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3333 - HISTORY OF RELIGIONS IN NORTH AMERICA


    Surveys the impact of the development of religious movements, institutions, ideas, practices and values on US and Canadian cultures, politics and society.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3345 - (W)MIDDLE AGES: LIFE AND CULTURE


    The political, socioeconomic, and cultural development of the civilization of Medieval Europe from the fall of Rome to the Medieval synthesis in the High Middle Ages.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: One history course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3350 - INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY


    An introduction to selected areas of the public history field for those students who would like to know more about career and employment opportunities outside of teaching. Topics include museums, archives, historic site interpretation, historic preservation, and historical societies.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 earned credits or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3357 - HISTORY OF ENGLAND


    A survey of the social, political, economic, and constitutional themes that have shaped the history of England.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3361 - EARLY MODERN EUROPE


    Political, social, economic, and cultural forces involved in the transition from medieval Western society with attention to the rise of national states and the growth of individualism.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3366 - TWENTIETH CENTURY EUROPE


    A study of the political, economic, cultural, and international developments in Europe during the twentieth century. Particular attention is given to the two World Wars and their causes, the rise of mass culture, the cold war, and the revolutions of 1989.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: One history course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3370 - HISTORY OF WORLD REVOLUTIONS


    This course examines the cause and effect of political, social and cultural revolutions from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits or Permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3377 - HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA


    A survey of Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean from Pre-Columbian Indian Civilizations to the 20th century. Emphasis is placed on the factors that have affected the region’s social, economic, and political development.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3387 - HISTORY OF EAST ASIA


    Traditional cultures and institutions of China and Japan and their roles in Korea and Southeast Asia; the role of Western powers in China’s development; post-war changes; United States foreign policy in relation to the Far East; and the emergence of Communist China and Modern Japan are discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: One history course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3388 - HISTORY OF AFRICA


    Surveys the history of Africa from Paleolithic times to the presents, with particular emphasis on broad regional trends and the formation of African states after 1800.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3390 - GENOCIDE IN THE 20TH CENTURY


    This course looks at the modern phenomenon of genocide, the mass killing of targeted groups of people by state entities in the 20th century, and primarily explores four case studies of genocide. The Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Cambodian genocide, and the Rwandan genocide. This course will also focus on the theory of genocide, how scholars define the concept and also how they explain the actions of perpetrators. Commonalities between these four case studies will be stressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr
  
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    HST 3395 - THE COLD WAR


    This course covers the period of the Cold War, from its origins late in the Second World War to its end with the revolutions of 1989 and the demise of the Soviet Union in December, 1991. We will especially look at the major events, international relations, and cultural impact of the Cold War.

    Prerequisites & Notes: One HST course.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 3401 - PENNSYLVANIA HISTORY


    The founding and development of Pennsylvania, emphasizing the social, political, and economic characteristics of the Commonwealth and the
    diversity of its people.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Completion of 45 credits.

    Credits: 3cr Dual Listed/Cross Listed: HST 4401
  
  •  

    HST 4401 - HISTORY OF PENNSYLVANIA


    The founding and development of Pennsylvania, emphasizing the social, political, and economic characteristics of the Commonwealth; the diversity of its people.  This course will count as a capstone course for the History major.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites:  HST 3290. History Majors.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: HST 3401
  
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    HST 4403 - THE US PRESIDENCY


    Examines the roles and powers of the executive branch in the US political system. Addresses the historical development of the institution and the relationship with other political actors (particularly Congress). Includes how the changing media and public environment has impacted the presidency and highlights the most recent campaigns.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Must have 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 4406 - THE WESTWARD MOVEMENT IN AMERICA


    Settlement of the geographic areas and the influence of westward expansions on the political, social and economic development of the American people. Includes the trans-Mississippi West and role of the Plains Indian in American history.

    Prerequisites & Notes: One HST course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 4415 - MODERN AMERICAN DIPLOMACY


    Explores American diplomacy from the Spanish American War through recent events. Included are the techniques, purposes, and problems of diplomacy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 4420 - NAZI GERMANY AND THE HOLOCAUST


    Explores the political, cultural, economic, and social history of National Socialism, from Hitler’s rise to political prominence in the 1920’s to the demise of the Third Reich in May, 1945. Particular attention is paid to the genesis of the Nazi Holocaust and its historical repercussions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: One HST course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 4431 - HISTORY OF CONSUMER CULTURE IN AMERICA


    Rise of contemporary consumption and its impact on American society since late 19th century. Historiography of consumer thought, materialism, and social excesses.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 4449 - PRACTICUM


    Designed to give experience in the work of a historic site or museum and an understanding of its position in the community. The student should become aware of the site or museum’s philosophy and goals, its formal and informal organization, and its role in public history and the community.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 60 Earned credits, 12 credits in HST, including at least one upper level HST course.

     

    Variable Credits: 1-5 cr. Notes:  May be repeated for a total of five credits.

  
  •  

    HST 4450 - INTERNSHIP


    Provides pre-professional skills. Museum and archival work are examples of areas in which students can bring together academic training and practical experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: permission of department chairperson, sponsoring instructor, and an agency.

    Credits: 3 - 12 cr. Notes: May be taken for 3 through 12 credits.
  
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    HST 4452 - SOUTH AFRICA: FROM CAPE COLONY TO APARTHEID


    Explores the history of South Africa, from its founding as a Dutch Colony in 1652 to the collapse of the Apartheid system in the 1990s and the election of Nelson Mandela as president of a multiethnic nation. Particular emphasis is placed on the history of racial segregation and the development of Apartheid.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: One history course.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 4471 - HISTORY OF MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN


    A survey of Mexico and the Caribbean basin from the rise of native civilizations to the revolutions of the 20th century and their aftermath. Studies the interaction of various racial groups, the formation of distinct national identities, and class conflict.

    Credits: 3 cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: ANH 4471.
  
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    HST 4487 - PACIFIC RIM: HISTORY AND THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD


    Study of the cultures and traditions of China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asian countries with special focus on the Newly Industrialized Countries and their participation in the global economy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    HST 4496 - SENIOR SEMINAR


    In-depth knowledge of historical methodology and research.  Significant historical problems are selected for oral discussion.  Topics will vary.  This course will count as a capstone course for the History major. 

    Prerequisites & Notes: HST 3290 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    HST 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
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    ITA 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN I


    Students will learn the most basic communicative skills and will be able to greet people, give personal information, and otherwise form simple sentences and ask questions.  Skills are taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required.  The course is appropriate for those with no experience or who wish to refresh their previous knowledge of the language.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    ITA 1102 - INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN II


    Continuation of introduction to Italian language and culture. Students will consolidate and expand their knowledge of basic structures and vocabulary of Italian as they become more familiar with the geographical, social, and cultural diversity of modern Italy. Skills are taught from a cultural emphasis and include pronunciation and speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing, and proper structures. Online language laboratory and other exercises are required. The course is appropriate for those who have completed ITA 1101 or equivalent, or 1-2 years of high school Italian courses.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ITA-1101 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
  •  

    JN 1100 - JOURNALISM


    Introduces the nature and practice of newsgathering, reporting, writing, editing, and professionalism. Students acquire basic skills by covering textbook examples and off-campus breaking stories.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    JN 2200 - CRISIS NEWS ANALYSIS


    Critically examines roles, functions, and performance of the media during crises. Addresses the nature of crisis reporting of war, disaster, and the global environment.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    JN 3310 - SPECIALIZED NEWS AND FEATURE WRITING


    Develops the journalism craft beyond routine coverage practices. Field assignments and classroom workshops offer practical experience in non-fiction depth/feature writing styles, interviewing techniques, and story marketing.

    Prerequisites & Notes: JN 1100.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    JN 3320 - MAGAZINE WRITING AND PRODUCTION


    Explores advanced non-fiction feature article writing and literary journalism, with an emphasis on magazine writing, design, and production. Students create the annual edition of Crossroads magazine published in May since 1990.

    Prerequisites & Notes: JN 1100, JN 3310 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    JN 3330 - CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN JOURNALISM


    Engages students in issues, problems, and criticism concerning the mass media. Material covers media ethics; First Amendment and libel concerns; group media ownership; and public perception of the media.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    JN 3340 - ONLINE JOURNALISM


    The class will include information on such emerging media themes as the ethical and legal implications of publishing online in a 24/7 environment; the characteristics that distinguish news Web sites and their stories from their print and broadcast counterparts; guidelines for doing research on the Internet; and the impact of blogs, wikis and other citizen journalism on mainstream media.

    Prerequisites & Notes: JN 1100 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    LDR 2325 - INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP STUDIES


    Provides students with an in-depth understanding of leadership studies and examines applications of leadership principles to the college environment as well as other settings in the community. Students participate in a campus or community setting where they can study and apply these principles.  Serves as an entry into the Minor in Leadership Studies.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    LDR 4425 - LEADERSHIP CAPSTONE


    A leadership seminar and practicum that provides a capstone to the Minor in Leadership Studies. Students will synthesize and integrate their interdisciplinary studies of leadership, complete self-assessments on their leadership abilities, complete a leadership portfolio with a focus on their future development as leaders, and initiate and complete an applied leadership project in the campus or community environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes: LDR 3325 and 15 earned credits in the Leadership Studies minor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    LS 4450 - LIBERAL STUDIES INTEGRATIVE INTERNSHIP


    This “capstone type” course,  is  a field-based experience,  integrating a  student’s General Education course work with course work in their minor or minors.  It is intended for students who are not permitted an internship in their minor, but who would benefit from an opportunity to expand their university experience by participating in a supervised, pre-professional work placement.

    Prerequisites & Notes: All course work completed in minor/s and within 18 credit hours of graduation.  Departmental approval based on student readiness and appropriateness of proposed placement.

    Credits: 6 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 0090 - BASIC ALGEBRA


    Introduction to basic algebra. Topics include real numbers, linear equations, formulas, exponents, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions and equations, graphing, systems of equations, radicals, word problems, and applications. DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD GENERAL EDUCATION OR TOTAL CREDITS NEEDED FOR GRADUATION.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 1115 - SURVEY OF MATHEMATICAL IDEAS


    A liberal arts course designed to acquaint the student with the nature and scope of modern mathematics. Emphasis is on concepts and understanding rather than the acquisition of technique. Topics included are suitable for the non-science liberal arts student. No extensive background in algebra is required.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 1117 - MATHEMATICS AND WORLD CULTURES


    This course, intended for non-majors, explores the development of mathematics in many diverse societies. Working within the historical framework, the student is introduced to significant mathematical concepts and to the way that different peoples have thought about and explored these concepts. The motivation for, development of, and basic procedures of various branches of mathematics (including trigonometry, analytic geometry, calculus, probability and statistics, and Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry) are investigated within their cultural contexts. No mathematical background is required beyond basic arithmetic.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    MA 1119 - FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICAL REASONING


    This course will center on quantitative reasoning skills. Areas of focus include deductive and inductive reasoning, critical thinking, numerical and geometrical reasoning, developing number sense, decision making under uncertainty, and mathematical communication skills. These skills will be presented and developed within the context of classical and everyday mathematical applications.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 1125 - INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS


    A survey of basic statistical methods for analyzing data. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, point and interval estimation, hypothesis tests, linear regression, correlation, and non-parametric tests.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 1126 - INFERENTIAL STATISTICS and PROBABILITY


    This is an introductory level statistics class with a primary focus on probability, inferential statistics, and regression analysis.  Inferential statistics topics include confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for regression parameters, goodness of fit tests, ANOVA, and non-parametric tests. 

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    MA 1128 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA


    Review of ideas in basic algebra, graphs, equations, inequalities, and a strong emphasis on functions (general, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic).

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    MA 1129 - FINITE MATHEMATICS


    An initial treatment of those topics in basic mathematics that are of special importance in business and the social sciences. Topics included are logic, sets and counting techniques, probability, mathematical models, linear equations and inequalities, introduction of linear programming, and matrices, also Markov Chains and Game Theory.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    MA 1135 - MATH APPLICATIONS IN INDUSTRY


    This course will center on the applications of quantitative reasoning skills in common industrial and environmental job situations. Areas of focus include unit conversions, calculation of proportions, applications of trigonometry, and the use of Excel for automating basic calculations in the workplace. These skills will be presented in the context of applied problem sets from a variety of industrial and environmental contexts.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    MA 1165 - PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS


    Intended to prepare students for the study of calculus. Topics include functions, graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and analytic trigonometry.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 1128 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 1170 - FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF CALCULUS


    The fundamental concepts of calculus is for non-physical science majors utilizing the basic techniques of differential and integral calculus. Not available to students who have completed MA 2231.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 1128 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 2203 - MATH FOR ELEMENTARY & SPECIAL EDUCATION


    A study of the basic ideas and structure in modern arithmetic, algebra, and geometry.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 2231 - CALCULUS I


    The purpose of this course is to develop a good understanding of limit, continuity, the derivative and its uses (including modeling and solving problems), to introduce the definite integral, and to establish the important relationship between the derivative and the definite integral. In this context the course will examine different classes of functions numerically, symbolically, and graphically. This course is intended for mathematics, science, and engineering majors. (Addresses NCTM Standards 1 .5.8 and 1 .5.10 for Mathematics Education majors.)

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 1165 or high school algebra and trigonometry.

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 2232 - CALCULUS II


    This is a continuation of MA 2231 and is intended to develop a good understanding of the definite integral and its uses including calculating area and applying numerical computation and estimation techniques, and to develop basic integration techniques. Differential equations, Taylor polynomials, series, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and polar coordinates, and analytic geometry are also covered. (Addresses NCTM Standards 1 .5.2, 1 .5.3, 1 .5.8, and 1 .5.10 for Mathematics Education majors.)

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2231 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 2233 - CALCULUS III


    This is a continuation of MA 2232, and the purpose of this course is to investigate functions of two or more variables. Topics include graphing functions of two or more variables, partial derivatives, vectors, optimization, double and triple integrals, line and surface integrals, and calculating volumes. (Addresses NCTM Standards 1 .5.3 and 1 .5.10 for Mathematics Education majors.)

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2232 or equivalent.

    Credits: 4 cr. General Education Requirement: Mathematics
  
  •  

    MA 3260 - DISCRETE STRUCTURES


    Foundations of mathematics emphasizing fundamental concepts in abstract mathematics and deductive reasoning. Topics include logic, mathematical induction, graph theory, recurrence relations, difference equations, Boolean algebra, sets, functions, relations, cardinality, number systems, and algorithms. (Addresses NCTM Standard 1 .5.11 for Mathematics Education majors.)

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3280 - LINEAR ALGEBRA AND MATRIX THEORY


    A study of the geometry of vectors, matrix algebra and operations, solutions of general systems of linear equations, inversion of matrices, determinants, vectors and vector spaces, subspaces, linear independence, bases and dimension, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and applications. (Addresses NCTM Standards 1 .5.11 and 1 .5.1 3 for Mathematics Education majors.)

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2232.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3301 - SURVEY OF MATHEMATICAL MODELS


    A survey of different math models, some deterministic and some stochastic, requiring no calculus background, designed to show non-trivial applications. Computer use is emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 1125 or MA 1129.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3305 - HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS FROM COUNTING TO CALCULUS


    An in-depth study of the chronological development of facets of mathematics up to the development of Calculus. The historical background of each facet is integrated with experience in mathematical study and application. Emphasis is placed on great mathematicians, their contributions, and their methods of reasoning, including the contributions of underrepresented groups and diverse cultures. Concepts of number, number systems, and the nature of axiomatic reasoning are also covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisite: MA 3260.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3306 - HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS FROM CALCULUS TO COMPUTERS


    An in-depth study of the chronological development of facets of mathematics beginning with the development of Calculus and continuing to the present day. The historical background of each facet is integrated with experience in mathematical study and application. Emphasis is placed on great mathematicians, their contributions, and their methods of reasoning, including the contributions of underrepresented groups and diverse cultures. Concepts of number, number systems, and the nature of axiomatic reasoning are also covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisite: MA 3260.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    MA 3308 - OPERATIONS RESEARCH


    Examines the development and use of the techniques of research. Topics include linear programming, queuing theory, probabilistic inventory models, and simulation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 1125, MA 2232, MA 3260, MA 3280 or MA 3314.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3310 - NUMERICAL ANALYSIS


    A study of numerical methods for the solution of algebraic, transcendental, and differential equations, numerical integration and differentiation, and error analysis.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2232.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3311 - DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I


    Techniques for solving ordinary differential equations, superposition principle, existence and uniqueness theorem, applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2232 (may be taken con-currently).

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3312 - DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II


    Additional work in partial differential equations and boundary value problems, numerical methods, qualitative treatment of differential equation in phase plane, stability issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 3311 and MA 2233 (may be taken concurrently).

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3314 - APPLIED PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS


    An introduction to applications of descriptive, inferential statistics, and probability. Descriptive statistics including frequency distributions, measures of location and variation; axioms of probability, probability (both theoretical and simulated), permutations, combinations, random variables, expected value, and decision making; probability distributions (both discrete and continuous), distribution functions, sampling and sampling distributions; statistical inferences concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; analysis of variance, non-parametric methods, regression, correlation, planning surveys and experiments. (Addresses NCTM Standards 1 .5.6, 1 .5.7, and 1 .5.11 for Mathematics Education majors.)

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 1170 or MA 2232.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3315 - APPLIED REGRESSION ANALYSIS


    Simple and multiple regression will be used to analyze data. Residual analysis, indicator variables, and step-wise and polynomial regression. Computer software will be used to analyze data.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 1125 or MA 3314.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3324 - APPLIED MATHEMATICS


    Illustrates the principles and basic styles of thought in solving physical problems by mathematical methods. Particle dynamics, heat and fluid flow, wave equations, vector, Fourier and tensor analysis.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2232 and MA 3280.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3329 - UNIFORM GEOMETRIES


    A study of the traditional modern geometries. Topics include: Euclid’s postulate system with special focus on his Fifth Postulate, Hilbert’s axiom system, the hyperbolic axiom system, spherical geometry, the Gauss-Bonnet theorem for triangles, and Klein’s transformational geometry. MA 3329 and MA 3330 may both be taken for credit, and either course can be taken before the other.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 3260 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3330 - NON-UNIFORM GEOMETRIES


    A study of the modern geometries leading up to the geometry of manifolds. Topics include: Euclid’s “algebraic” propositions., Descartes’ analytic geometry, the analytic approach to Euclidean geometry, Euclid’s and Hilbert’s axioms as theorems in analytic geometry, Euclid’s Fifth Postulate and the birth of non-Euclidean geometry, Descartes’ lost manuscript and the angle deficit, angle deficit and curvature, the polyhedral Gauss-Bonnet theorem, paper models of curved surfaces, and an introduction to Gaussian curvature and Riemannian geometry. MA 3329 and MA 3330 may both be taken for credit, and either course can be taken before the other.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 3260 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3335 - NUMBER THEORY


    An analytical study of basic concepts including divisibility, congruence, quadratic reciprocity and Diophantine equations. Varied methods are stressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2232 and MA 3260.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3345 - REAL ANALYSIS I


    The real number system. Emphasis on the concepts and theoretical approach to calculus: functions, sequences, series, limits, continuity, derivatives, the Riemann integrals, and sequences of functions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2233 and MA 3260.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3348 - COMPLEX VARIABLES


    A first course in complex variables. Complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary functions, mappings by elementary functions, integrals, power series, residues, poles, and conformal mappings.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2233.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3361 - MODERN ALGEBRA - GROUPS


    A study of abstract algebraic structures focusing on groups. Topics include: dihedral groups. cyclic groups, permutation groups, subgroups, cosets, quotient groups, homomorphisms, isomorphisms, cardinality, generators and relations, Lagrange’s theorem, Cayley’s theorem, the fundamental homomorphism theorem, the fundamental theorem for abelian groups, and applications of groups. MA 3361 and MA 3362 may both be taken for credit, and either course can be taken before the other.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 3260 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3362 - MODERN ALGEBRA - RINGS


    A study of abstract algebraic structures focusing on rings. Topics include: rings, integral domains, fields, subrings, ideals, quotient rings, fields of quotients, the division algorithm, factorization of polynomials (reducibility and unique factorization), field extensions, and applications of rings/fields. MA 3361 and MA 3362 may both be taken for credit, and either course can be taken before the other.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 3260 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3371 - MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I


    Distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, expected values and moments, conditional probability and independence, special discrete and continuous distributions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2233.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
  •  

    MA 3381 - TOPOLOGY


    Introduction to point-set topology. Set theory, metric spaces, topological spaces, connectedness, and compactness.

    Prerequisites & Notes: MA 2232 and MA 3260.

    Credits: 3 cr.
 

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