Aug 22, 2019  
Mansfield University 2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    SWK 3352 - SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH FAMILIES


    Focuses on ethical practice content that encompasses values, knowledge, and skills to work with FAMILIES, including engaging clients in an appropriate working relationship; identifying needs, resources, and assets; collecting and assessing information; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; and planning for service delivery. Includes content on identifying, analyzing, and implementing empirically based interventions designed to achieve client goals, through the use of communication skills, supervision, and consultation. Emphasizes strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems, especially those populations at risk, in relation to their broader environments. Promotes strategies for effective practice with persons from diverse backgrounds and considers technological advances.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Social work candidacy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3353 - SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE WITH INDIVIDUALS


    Focuses on ethical practice content that encompasses values, knowledge, and skills to work with INDIVIDUALS, including engaging clients in an appropriate working relationship; identifying needs, resources, and assets; collecting and assessing information; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; and planning for service delivery. Includes content on identifying, analyzing, and implementing empirically based interventions designed to achieve client goals, through the use of communication skills, supervision, and consultation. Emphasizes strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems, especially those populations at risk, in relation to their broader environments. Promotes strategies for effective practice with persons from diverse backgrounds and considers technological advances.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Social work candidacy.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 3452 - CHILD WELFARE PRACTICUM


    Students enrolled in the Child Welfare for Baccalaureates Program (CWEB) will complete a 475 hour practicum in a child welfare agency which meets the requirement of the state CWEB Program, reinforces students’ identification with the purposes, values, and ethics of the field of social work in child welfare, fosters the integration of empirical and practice-based knowledge, and promotes the development of professional competence for child welfare social work practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Enrollment in the CWEB Program.

    Co-requisites: SWK 3321.

    Credits: 1 cr.

  
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    SWK 4452 - FIELD EDUCATION


    Provides a 500 hour supervised field placement in an agency setting.  Field education reinforces students’ identification with the purposes, value, and ethics of the profession, fosters the integration of empirical and evidenced based practice knowledge, and promotes the development of professional competence for generalist social work practice.  Field Education incorporates a Capstone paper and presentation, which represents the culminating assignment for the Social Work program, and is designed to focus on the integration of the curriculum with the Field Education experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Completion of all SWK major required courses with the exception of SWK 4453, and the acceptance of the Field Education Application by the Faculty Evaluation Committee. Co-requisite: SWK 4453.

    Credits: 12 cr.
  
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    SWK 4453 - FIELD SEMINAR


    Taken concurrently with SWK 4452, this seminar integrates the field experience with the knowledge, values, ethics, and skills of the social work profession for competent generalist practice. Prepares students for active participation in the process of supervision and addresses issues of diversity, populations at risk, and social and economic justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-requisite: SWK 4452.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    SWK 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for 1 through 3 credits at one time.
  
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    WLC 2500 - INTRODUCTION TO PARIS


    This course is an introduction to everyday life in Paris, at once a global modern city and a living museum.  Paris is a vibrant culture and commercial hub and the academic place of excellence in France, a city of continuity and change, of love and conflicts - the home of expatriates, artists, romantics, and revolutionaries of every kind.  We will study the history and geography of Paris and trace the city’s evolution, from its Roman arena to its Eiffel Tower, from the Louvre’s medieval foundations to its ultra-modern glass pyramid.  We will look at architecture, painting, sculpture, music, literature, film, and popular culture and study how they express ways of life over the centuries.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    WLC 2510 - INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN FILM


    This course is taught in English and introduces students to film as a mirror of German culture, offering a cross-section of typical sociopolitical and cultural themes.  Topics might include Expressionist films and their relation to art and literature, films from divided Germany with perspectives from West and East, films about coming to grips with the Nazi German past, and trends in German cinema since the reunification in 1990.  Students will become acquainted with some of the important figures in German films and will examine contemporary issues in society via the film medium.  Evaluations include class discussion, reaction papers, quizzes, exams, and projects.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    WLC 2520 - INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN CULTURES


    This course will expose students to the major cultural transformations that have shaped the development of many of the Latin American civilizations from the pre-Columbian period to the present.  Course topics may include Ancient Americas, the Conquest, the Colonial World, the creation of the Nation State, Globalization, and Intervention and Diaspora.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    WLC 3300 - PHONETICS AND LANGUAGE STRUCTURES


    This course is a general introduction to phonetics and language structures, open to all students and taught in English.  Students can expect to study the speech organs and how this knowledge helps to articulate and pronounce foreign language words with more precision and better sentence rhythm, and they will learn how to use the International Phonetic Alphabet.  The themes of this class may also include:  communication systems, common language structures, language dialects, regional pronunciation patterns, word and sentence structures, origins of puzzling phenomena in English, language acquisition, and identity.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    WLC 3310 - LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION


    In this course, students will explore the cultures of the French, German and Spanish speaking worlds by reading a representative selection of literary works in translation.  Students can expect to read, study, and discuss a representative sample of translated texts in all of these languages and in all of the major literary genres.  A variety of themes will be covered in this course, some of which include: gender, mythology, sports, voices of resistance, stereotyping, modernity, family, immigration, diaspora, civil rights, etc. Throughout the course, students will reflect on cultural differences in thought, aesthetic style, and thematic emphasis.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    WLC 3320 - FRANCE THROUGH FILM


    This course gives students an opportunity to look at a culture other than their own through its representation in films, and helps them discover unknown aspects of their own culture through the examination of a foreign one. While watching a selection of French movies (in French with English subtitles), we will explore aspects of recent French history and their influence contemporary French culture; reflect on the interaction of various cultural (social) systems in France and other French-speaking communities; work on analytical skills; learn how to read film, literature, essays and relate them to a historical/social/cultural background. The films chosen illustrate key periods of French society from the pre-Revolutionary period to the beginning of the 21st century.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take ENG 1112

    Credits: 3cr

  
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    WLC 3336 - GERMANY A VIRTUAL TOUR


    By means of an imaginary trip through the states of contemporary Germany, this course offers a detailed overview of the country’s geography, major cities and towns, regional identities, and tourist destinations and curiosities within each region. Along the way, pertinent information about economy, customs, cultural idiosyncrasies, architecture, history, technological developments, and many other aspects is discussed. Students gain insight into their own way of life and culture through frequent comparison with German culture throughout the course “trip.” Extensive use is made of Internet resources, along with other print and audiovisual materials, supported and evaluated by class discussions, brief presentations, quizzes and tests, and a final project.

    Prerequisites & Notes: 30 Earned Credits

    Credits: 3crs
  
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    WLC 3340 - FRENCH GRAPHIC LITERATURE


    This course explores major directions of French graphic literature since the early 20th century. Reading French-language “bandes dessinees” (comic strips, or graphic novels) in English translations helps us discover aspects of French and French-speaking culture. Representative texts include “comic” (funny) strips playing with stereotypical representations of cultures in history or science-fiction, short stories representing current events and social situations in France, “serious” graphic literature interpreting  major social or historical events, and/or literary works in the French language. Students reflect on intercultural representations in France and other French-speaking places while analyzing comics within their complex background of social, cultural, historical events.

    Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1112 or 30 earned credits

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    WLC 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline.
    The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field. May be taken for one,
    two or three credits at one time.

    Variable Credits: 1-3cr
  
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    WS 1100 - INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN’S STUDIES


    Cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural examination of the ways that language, images, and socialization have constructed women’s roles. Examines contemporary women’s issues (work and family, sexuality, violence against women), as well as the women’s movement and the role of women artists. Emphasis is on students (both female and male) working to discover the impact of these roles and issues in their own lives as well as in the larger world.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    WS 2909 - WOMEN OUTDOORS


    This course approaches the experience and perception of women outdoors from a variety of disciplines-rhetoric, cultural geography, recreations and leisure studies, history, and literature-all from a feminist perspective. We read essays giving an analytical framework for the books and films by women who hunt, fish, rock climb, mountain bike and surf. We explore issues such as how our cultural views and metaphorical constructs of women and nature affect participation in outdoor recreation, how women involved with recreation are talked to and about as compared to men, and what all this means for women who participate in outdoor recreation and for men who work or play outdoors with women.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Minimum 15 earned credits.

    Credits: 3cr. Dual Listed/Cross Listed: REC 2909
  
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    WS 4410 - SEMINAR IN WOMEN’S STUDIES


    An in-depth examination of a topic in Women’s Studies including women’s contributions, knowledge, and perceptions taught from a cross-disciplinary, cross-cultural perspective in seminar style. This serves as the capstone course for the Women’s Studies minor.

    Prerequisites & Notes: WS 1100, two other Women’s Studies courses, and junior standing or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr. Notes: May be taken for a total of 9 credits.
  
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    WSM 1625 - INTRODUCTION TO WATERSHED MANAGEMENT


    This introductory course explores important processes, concepts, and approaches to watershed management and assessment. Topics include: delineation of watersheds, movement of surface and sub-surface water, and the interaction of water, land and biota. This class is appropriate for anyone interested in the environment and water resources. Field work is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Co-Requisite: WSM-1625L.

    Credits: 4cr
  
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    WSM 1625L - WATERSHED MANAGEMENT LAB


    This is a field-based laboratory that investigates surface water in the context of watershed management. Students will collect data and solve problems related to stream discharge, water quality, and sediment dynamics. Students will produce written reports detailing field methods, analysis methods, and interpretations.

    Credits: 0cr
  
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    WSM 2855 - WETLAND IDENTIFICATION, MANAGEMENT AND POLICY


    This course allows students to gain an understanding of wetland identification using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manual along with learning the value, policy and ethical issues of wetland management. Wetland-related topics include: identification, delineation, mapping, pertinent regulations, court decision, ethical concerns, permitting issues, policies, management and protection. Field work outside of normal class time is required.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    WSM 3010 - WATERSHED SYSTEMS


    This watershed course focuses on system analysis of the physical, chemical and biological interactions of watersheds. It will consider procedures used to characterize the human, aquatic, riparian, and upland features. It will look at conditions, processes and interactions within a watershed, including lakes and rivers. The system analysis at the watershed level provides a systematic way to understand and organize information for the purpose of understanding the consequences of management actions prior to implementation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: WSM 1625 & WSM 1625L.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    WSM 3020 - PRACTICUM


    An out-of-class learning experience that allows students to observe or participate in applied work.  Practicums are graded S or U - they do not affect your GPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 - 5 crs. Notes: May be repeated for a total of five credits. 
  
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    WSM 3105 - ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING


    This course will focus on environmental permitting concerning streams and wetlands. It will introduce baseline environmental reports, NPDES permits, E&S permits, and water obstruction and encroachment permits (section 401 and 404 permits). Students will complete field work and the appropriate forms and supporting materials associated with the permitting process.

    Prerequisites & Notes: WSM-2855

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    WSM 3500 - WATERSHED RESTORATION


    An advanced course in Watershed Management that covers various aspects of watershed restoration including: what it is, how its accomplished, and who carries it out.  Also covers the scientific approach to watershed assessment and the role of public education in restoration activities.  Field work is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: WSM 1600.

    Credits: 3 cr. General Education Requirement: Professional Electives
  
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    WSM 4496 - INTERNSHIP


    Offers practical work experience and the opportunity to apply and to further develop appropriate skills.  All internships will be grades S or U - they do not affect your QPA.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 6 - 12 cr.
  
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    XRT 1010 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY I


    Course content provides an introduction to the basic elements of radiologic technology. Students will discuss and evaluate mediolegal issues, professionalism in radiology, radiation protection practices, and radiologic terms. This course is a professional course within the Radiology Technology curriculum and radiology students are given preference. With instructor permission, course enrollment is open to any university student.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    XRT 1020 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY II


    The goal of this course is to present a basic introduction to imaging equipment operation and concepts of patient care. Students will also learn radiographic examination considerations for the extremities, spine, shoulder girdle, pelvic girdle and bony thorax.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take XRT 1010, BSC 1121, and MA 1128.

    Credits: 5cr.
  
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    XRT 1030 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY III


    Course content acquaints the student with principles of radiation exposure and concepts of radiation biology.  Emphasis will be placed on radiographic examinations of the biliary, urinary, and digestive systems. Basic contrast studies and pediatric radiography is also presented. Drug pharmacology and radiographic contrast media will be discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take XRT-1020 and BSC-1122.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    XRT 1040 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY IV


    Course content is designed to impart an understanding of the components, principles and operation of digital imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology. Factors that impact exposure factors, image acquisition, display, archiving/retrieval, and image quality are included. This course also includes  radiographic examinations of the cranium, mobile, and trauma radiography and a review of previously learned concepts from other professional courses.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Take XRT 1030.

    Credits: 3cr.
  
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    XRT 1104 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY IV


    Course content acquaints students with the principles of radiographic film processing. Emphasis will be placed on radiographic examinations of the cranium, mobile radiography, and trauma radiography. Students will learn concepts related to image analysis and review introductory radiographic concepts presented in previous professional courses.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1103.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    XRT 1105 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY V


    This course includes the study of pathology and disease, computed tomography (CT), and quality assurance.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1040.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    XRT 1106 - X-RAY TECHNOLOGY VI


    The purpose of this course is to review the knowledge and skills underlying the performance of the major tasks typically required of an entry-level diagnostic radiographer. Students will also become familiar with the basic concept of technical reporting and evaluation. (Pre-requisite: XRT 1105).

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1105.

     

    Credits: 4 cr.

  
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    XRT 1107 - FUNDAMENTALS OF RADIOLOGIC SCIENCE AND HEALTH CARE


    Content is designed to provide an overview of the foundations in radiography and the practitioner’s role in the health care delivery system. Principles, practices and policies of the health care organization(s) will be examined and discussed in addition to professional responsibilities of the radiographer.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XTR 1010, BSC 1121 and MA 1128.

    Credits: 1 cr.
  
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    XRT 1108 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR THE RADIOGRAPHER


    Students will be introduced to the origins of medical terminology and the word-building system used in the medical field. The words, abbreviations, and symbols used in the medical environment will be discussed. An orientation to the understanding of radiographic orders and interpretation of diagnostic reports will be addressed through the related terminology.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1010, BSC 1121, and MA 1128.

    Credits: 2 cr.
  
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    XRT 2203 - X-RAY PHYSICS


    This course will provide the student will knowledge of basic radiologic physics. Atomic theory, nature and characteristics of radiation, x-ray production, and fundamentals of photon interactions with matter are discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1030.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    XRT 2221 - CLINICAL COURSE I


    The main purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the proper operation and utilization of modern diagnostic radiologic equipment. Initially, students will receive a general orientation regarding the clinical facilities and policies. While under the direct supervision of clinical faculty and registered radiographers, students will perform the radiographic examinations presented in course XRT 1020. Students are required to demonstrate and practice the competencies, which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1010, BSC 1121, and MA 1128.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    XRT 2222 - CLINICAL COURSE II


    Students will practice the competencies acquired in the previous clinical course and begin working towards achieving competency for radiographic examinations presented in course XRT 1030. Clinical rotations will begin in the specialty areas. Students are required to demonstrate and practice the competencies which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1020 and XRT 2221.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    XRT 2223 - CLINICAL COURSE III


    Students will continue to practice the competencies acquired in the previous clinical courses while working towards achieving competency for examinations of the skull. Emphasis will be placed on radiographic examinations from courses XRT 1020, XRT 1030, and XRT 1040. Clinical rotations will continue in the specialty areas. Students will also begin an evening clinical rotation which emphasizes trauma radiography. Students are required to demonstrate and practice competencies which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1030, and XRT 2222.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    XRT 2224 - CLINICAL COURSE IV


    Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate competency for general diagnostic examinations of most systems of the body, while continuing to practice the competencies acquired in previous clinical course. Training will begin in the areas of nuclear medicine and vascular imaging and will continue to magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. Students are required to demonstrate and practice the competencies, which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1040, and XRT 2223.

     

    Credits: 3 cr.

  
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    XRT 2225 - CLINICAL COURSE V


    During this final clinical practicum, students will complete clinical assignments that require the demonstration of competencies in a wide variety of general diagnostic entry-level radiologic examinations. Students will have a final opportunity to practice competencies achieved in previous clinical practice. Clinical rotations through the specialty areas will be completed. Students are required to demonstrate and practice the competencies which are included in the course goals and objectives.

    (Pre-requisites: XRT 1105 and XRT 2224.)

     

    Prerequisites & Notes: XRT 1105 and XRT 2224.

    Corequisite: XRT 1106.

    Credits: 3 cr.

 

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