Aug 14, 2020  
Mansfield University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Mansfield University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    BUS 4450 - ORGANIZATIONAL INTERNSHIP


    Supervised and evaluated participation in the regular activities of a business, government, agency, or appropriate organization. In consultation with the supervising faculty member, the student is expected to prepare a comprehensive final report relating to the work accomplished during the field experience.

    Credits: 1 – 15 cr.Notes: May be taken for 1 through 1 5 credits. No more than 6 credits count toward the major.
  
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    BUS 4451 - MANAGING THE ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR


    An examination of theories, concepts, and research findings emerging from the various disciplines which study individual and group behavior within organizational systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: Bus 2230.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    BUS 4490 - BUSINESS POLICY


    This capstone course addresses general management skills that integrate the various functions of the organization. An analysis of the problems and complexities of strategic decision making. Develop skills in formulating strategic considerations using environmental analysis, resource assessment, assumption development, goal determination, strategy formulation, implementation, and performance evaluation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: 75 earned credits; ECO 1101, MA 1125, and MA 1170.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    BUS 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.Notes: May be taken for one, two or three credits at one time.
  
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    CDN 1101 - INTRODUCTION TO CANADA


    An interdisciplinary course. Provides a comprehensive introduction to Canada stressing the basics of geography, history, economics, politics, and culture before taking up various contemporary issues, among them: constitutional reform, environmental issues, and the sovereignty of Canada’s Native People.

    Credits: 3 cr.General Education Requirement: May satisfy General Education requirements
  
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    CDN 3370 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    Open to students who wish to study in Canada. Plans for study at a Canadian university should be presented at least one semester prior to departure. Number of credits granted will be based on validated credentials presented to the Canadian Studies program. The student should register for CDN 33 70-3380 prior to departure. Students should consult the regulations for study-abroad available in the Office of the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3371 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3372 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3373 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3374 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3375 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3376 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3377 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3378 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3379 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 3380 - FOREIGN STUDY – CANADA


    See CDN 3370 for course description.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CDN 4450 - INTERNSHIP


    Supervised participation in a business or government agency in Ontario or Quebec, or in a U.S. business or government agency with Canadian interests.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CDN 1101 and 6 credits in Canadian Studies.

    Credits: 1 - 6 cr.Notes: May be taken for 1 through 6 credits.
  
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    CDN 4490 - SELECTED TOPICS IN CANADIAN STUDIES


    An in-depth study of an issue or problem in Canadian culture, politics or business.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CDN 11 01 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CHM 1101 - INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY


    A treatment of fundamental principles for non-science majors. Does not meet degree requirements for chemistry or biology majors.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 1, 2]General Education Requirement: May satisfy General Education requirements
  
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    CHM 1102 - ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY


    Deals with the principles of organic and biochemistry and their application to topics such as nutrition, consumer products, and the environment. In the laboratory students carry out various reactions, syntheses, analyses, and separations that exemplify the practice of organic and biochemistry. This course does not meet degree requirements for chemistry or biology majors.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 11 01 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 1, 2]General Education Requirement: May satisfy General Education requirements
  
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    CHM 1103 - CHEMISTRY AND THE ENVIRONMENT


    Examines the theory and practice of chemistry and its relationship with the environment. The impact of modern day living on the environment will be examined. Topics treated will be integrated and historically developed. This course is intended for General Education  science credit and does not meet degree requirements for the chemistry major.

    Credits: 3 cr.General Education Requirement: May satisfy General Education requirements
  
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    CHM 1105 - HOW DRUGS WORK


    This lecture course outlines the mechanisms by which drugs exert their effects on the body. It begins with a discussion of molecular structures of drugs and their targets in the body, and then reviews physiological aspects of various disease states and the ways different drug classes modify the relevant physiology. This course is intended for General Education science credit and does not meet degree requirements for the chemistry major.

    Credits: 3 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 0]General Education Requirement: May satisfy General Education requirements
  
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    CHM 1106 - CHEMISTRY FOR THE ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES


    A one-semester survey course for non-science majors. General organic, biochemistry, and clinical chemistry are emphasized for students in health support programs.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [4, 0, 0]
  
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    CHM 1110 - SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY, INTRODUCTORY, ORGANIC, AND BIOLOGICAL


    A survey course for non-science majors. General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry are emphasized. DOES NOT meet degree requirements for chemistry and biology majors.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 1, 2]General Education Requirement: May satisfy General Education requirements
  
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    CHM 1111 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY I


    For science majors. A study of the fundamental principles of chemistry from the standpoint of stoichiometry, gases, states of matter, solution reactions, bonding, atomic and molecular structure. Laboratory sessions stress the chemical principles discussed in the lecture.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 3]General Education Requirement: May satisfy General Education requirements
  
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    CHM 1112 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY II


    A continuation of 1111: kinetics, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction, acid-base theory and equilibrium are studied.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 1111.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 3]General Education Requirement: May satisfy General Education requirements
  
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    CHM 2201 - INTRODUCTION TO BIOCHEMISTRY


    An introductory course in biochemistry with particular emphasis on human nutrition. Major topics are fuel management and the organization and control of metabolic pathways. The laboratory component includes separation, analysis, and properties of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and enzymes. This course does not meet degree requirements for chemisty and biology majors.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 11 02.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 2]
  
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    CHM 3264 - CHEM MTDS FOREN SCI


    An advanced treatment of the chemical methods used in the investigation of criminal activities. The use and reliability of chemical tests, solubilities, and reactions as well as the chemistry of chromatographic, spectroscopic and instrumental analysis will be included.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CHM-1 11 0 SCI-1104 SCI-1 1 07. Corequisite course: CHM-3264L

    Credits: 3 cr.Variable Credits: [2, 0, 2]
  
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    CHM 3301 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I


    Fundamentals of organic chemistry are presented. Modern theory, reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry are included along with nomenclature, preparation, reactions and properties of organic compounds. The laboratory stresses syntheses, chemical and physical properties and an introduction to instrumental techniques. The laboratory period includes one hour of lecture on theory and techniques of laboratory operations.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 1112.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 4]
  
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    CHM 3302 - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II


    A continuation of 3301. The laboratory period includes one hour of lecture on theory and techniques of laboratory operations.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 3301.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 4]
  
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    CHM 3311 - QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS


    An introductory course in analytical chemistry emphasizing classical titrimetric and gravimetric methods and related theories.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 1112.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 4]
  
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    CHM 3321 - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I


    An introduction to the methods and topics of physical chemistry. Topics include introduction to thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, atomic structure, and molecular spectroscopy.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 1112, 3302, MA223 1, PHY 221 0 and 2211.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 4]
  
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    CHM 3322 - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II


    A continuation of 3321 . Advanced study of the methods and topics covered in physical chemistry I. MA 2233 is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 3321 and MA 2232.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 4]
  
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    CHM 3332 - INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS


    Deals with the principles and applications of instrumental methods in chemical analysis. Studies include electroanalytical, spectrophotometric, and chromatographic techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 33 11.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 4]
  
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    CHM 3341 - BIOCHEMISTRY


    A study of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, vitamins, and hormones in terms of structure, function, and synthesis in living systems. The laboratory includes the isolation, identification, and chemical behavior of biochemically important molecules.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 3302 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 3]
  
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    CHM 3352 - RADIOCHEMISTRY


    The study of radioisotope methodology. A laboratory oriented course familiarizing the student with radiation detection and applications in natural science problems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.Variable Credits: [2, 0, 3]
  
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    CHM 4410 - SEMINAR


    Deals with reports emphasizing chemical literature searches and/or current research.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: upper division chemistry major.

    Credits: 1 cr.Variable Credits: [1, 0, 0]
  
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    CHM 4420 - QUALITATIVE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY


    The identification of organic compounds by various classical and instrumental techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 3302.

    Credits: 3 cr.Variable Credits: [2, 0, 4]
  
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    CHM 4421 - ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY


    An advanced lecture course designed to deepen and expand knowledge in the field. Topics such as reactions, mechanisms, reactive intermediates, photochemistry, kinetics, stereochemistry, natural products, and spectroscopy may be stressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 3302 and 3321.

    Credits: 3 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 0]
  
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    CHM 4431 - ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY


    A presentation of atomic structure and periodic properties. In addition to other topics; valence bond, molecular orbital, crystal and ligand field theories are treated. Laboratory sessions include one hour of lecture on theory and techniques in the preparation of representative compounds.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 1112 and 3321.

    Credits: 4 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 4]
  
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    CHM 4432 - STRUCTURAL CHEMISTRY


    The symmetry and structural properties of molecular systems are utilized to determine their energy levels. The electronic and vibrational spectroscopic properties of these systems will be predicted also utilizing symmetry properties. These spectra-structure correlations will be made on organic and inorganic systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CHM 3302 and 3321.

    Credits: 3 cr.Variable Credits: [3, 0, 0]
  
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    CHM 4490 - PROBLEMS IN CHEMISTRY


    Involves the student in study projects under the direct supervision of an instructor. Library and laboratory research in selected problems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.Variable Credits: [0, 0, variable]Notes: May be taken for one through three credits.
  
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    CHM 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.Variable Credits: [0, 0, variable]Notes: May be taken for 1 - 3 credits at one time.
  
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    CIS 1101 - COMPUTERS IN SOCIETY


    Examines the impact of computers on modern society and how they are programmed and used. A variety of computer applications from the social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, and professions will be studied.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 1102 - VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING


    Introduces problem solving through the use of the programming language, Visual Basic. Enables students to write programs, which they can use for Windows development, scientific computing, spreadsheet design, and database work.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 1103 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTERS


    Introduces an operating System for microcomputers and the use of word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 1104 - COMPUTER SCIENCE I


    Introduces a high-level programming language as a means of studying problem solving, algorithms, and program structure. Includes data representation, repetition, selection, modular programming, debugging, and verification of programs.

    Credits: I 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 2203 - SOFTWARE FOR BUSINESS APPLICATIONS


    Advanced applications of spreadsheets, data base management systems, and graphics.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 2204 - COMPUTER SCIENCE II


    Emphasizes algorithms, structured programming and program analysis and design. Topics include files, records, recursion, string manipulation, graphics, and dynamic data structures.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 11 04

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 2206 - BUSINESS PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS I


    An introduction to analyzing and designing solutions to business-related problems using a business programming language.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 11 04.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3300 - PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES


    Comparative study of current programming languages. Examines the structure of languages and their use in problem solving.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 2204 and 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3301 - DATA STRUCTURES


    Topics covered are data types, arrays, records, stacks, queues, linked lists, and trees. Other more advanced topics may include: file structures, recursion, heuristics, and hashing.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 2204.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3303 - WEB SITE DESIGN


    An introduction to the principles of Web Site Design. The syntax and semantics of HTML is covered. Multimedia elements will also be introduced.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3306 - BUSINESS PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS II


    A second course in business programming stressing data processing and advanced programming techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 2206

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3308 - OPERATIONS RESEARCH


    The development and use of the techniques of operations research. Topics include linear programming, queuing theory, probabilistic inventory models and simulation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 2203 or 2204; MA 1125 or 3314; MA 1129, 3260 or 3280; MA 11 70 or 2231.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3309 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS


    This is an introductory course to computer-based information systems (CBIS) with emphasis on information processing systems as a tool for management of organizations. This course requries that students learn to use software and hardware to facilitate managerial decision-making, planning, and control.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 1104 or CIS 2203.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3310 - SYSTEMS ANALYSIS


    An introduction to the concepts of systems analysis and design. Problem definition; data gathering, information analysis, presentation techniques, implementation planning, system controls, documentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: BUS 1130 or 2230, and CIS 2203 or 2206.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3311 - SOFTWARE ENGINEERING


    This is an introductory course which covers the application of engineering principles to the building of computer software. It provides a general overview to the field of Software Engineering. Topics may include theories, tools, and methods for the systematic representation, design, implementation, verification, validation, management, and maintenance of computer software systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 3301.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3314 - (ACC) AUTOMATED ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS


    Introduction to the development and implementation of an accounting information system.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: ACC 331 5 and CIS 2203 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3320 - COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE


    Classification of computers. Defining hardware and software interfaces within a computer system. Special purpose architectures.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 3330

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3325 - OPERATING SYSTEMS


    Functions and characteristics of an operating system: concurrent processes, system nucleus, memory management, input and output, filing system, resource allocation and scheduling, system protection and reliability, and job control.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 3301 and 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3330 - COMPUTER ORGANIZATION


    Overview of computer hardware, computer structure, machine representation of information, instruction codes, addressing, concepts of digital logic, microprogramming and assembly language programming.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 11 04.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3335 - ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGRAMMING


    Explores assembly language programming including macro and subroutines. Emphasis will be on application and systems programming including machine organization for a general purpose computer.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 2204 and 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3340 - DATABASE SYSTEMS


    First course in the theory and use of database management systems. Provides experience in the creation of an actual database system and the manipulation of the data in it.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 3301 and CIS 3306.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3350 - ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS


    An introduction to the study of the theory and design of algorithms. Topics may include analysis of Abstract Data Types (ADTs), NP-Completeness, study of various graph algorithms, searching and sorting algorithms, and a look at algorithm design techniques such as greedy algorithms, divide and conquer, dynamic programming, and branch-and-bound.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 3301.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3361 - ANALYTICAL METHODS OF INFORMATION SCIENCE


    The study of key mathematical developments in computer science. Topics will include: sets, functions, relations, graphs, and digraphs. Other computer-specific topics may include: recursion, finite state machines, formal language theory, list processing support for management and decision functions.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 2204 and 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 3390 - NETWORKING 1


    Introduction to the underlying principles of networking. Concepts of network protocols and network applications are covered. TCP/IP principles will be taught.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 2204.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4309 - E-COMMERCE SYSTEMS


    This course provides tools, skills, and an understanding of technology, business concepts and issues that surround the emergence of electronic commerce. The student develops an understanding o fthe current practices and opportunities in electronic publishing, electronic shopping, electronic distribution, and electronic collaboration. The student also explores several of the problem areas in electronic commerce.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 3309 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr
  
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    CIS 4420 - SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN COMPUTER APPLICATIONS


    Study of a specialized topic. Possible topics include Computer Aided Design, Data Base Systems, Telecommunications, Advanced Business Programming.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4430 - PROGRAM TRANSLATION


    The theoretical aspects of program translation: Compilers, assemblers, and interpreters

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 3301 and 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4440 - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE


    The application of computers to solve problems and to understand the principles of human intelligence including search, reasoning, and problem reduction. Applications to games, expert systems, natural language, learning, robotics, and computer vision.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CIS 2204.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4441 - SWITCHING THEORY AND LOGIC DESIGN


    An introduction to electronic circuits used in digital systems including computers, instruments, communications systems, and control systems. Topics include Boolean algebra, switching theory, logic design, and major digital circuit lines.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 2204 and 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4450 - ORGANIZATIONAL INTERNSHIP


    Supervised and evaluated participation in the regular activities of a business, government, agency, or appropriate organization. In consultation with the supervising faculty member, the student is expected to prepare a comprehensive final report relating to the work accomplished during the field experience.

    Credits: 6 - 12 cr.Notes: May be taken for 1 through 12 credits. No more than 6 credits count toward the major.
  
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    CIS 4490 - NETWORKING II


    Second course in data and computer communications. Communication principles, computer requirements, networking, standards, and future trends and issues will be examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CIS 3390 and CIS 3330.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CIS 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field.

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.Notes: May be taken for 1 - 3 credits at one time.
  
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    CJA 1100 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE


    An introduction to the field of criminal justice, its major components, roles and functions. Emphasis is placed upon concepts of law and the historical descriptive analysis of the police, courts, and corrections.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 2200 - SURVEY OF POLICING


    Introduction to law enforcement problems and practices; its legal, political, and historical framework. An analysis of police organizations and their relationship with other criminal justice and social agencies.

  
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    CJA 2201 - SURVEY OF CORRECTIONS


    Origin and history of incarceration practices and procedures; associated organizational, criminological and phenological concepts; categories of inmates and laws affecting classification; special custody problems and treatment programs, staff organization; professional, administrative and custodial personnel training, recruitment and promotions; interagency relationships and cooperation; release programs, furloughs, work-release, and final discharge.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3261 - COMMUNITY POLICING


    This course will focus on the individual and societal aspects of police-community relations, police and minority groups, and social change and law enforcement. It will also cover the changing role of police from a community policing perspective.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CJA 1100 and CJA 2200.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3262 - INVESTIGATION AND INTERROGATION


    An introduction to the fundamentals of criminal investigation, rules of evidence, sources of information, observations, descriptions, and identification, including collection, preservation, and processing of physical evidence, records, reports, statements, case preparation, surveillance and undercover techniques, and modus operandi information.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3267 - COMMUNITY AND INSTITUTIONAL CORRECTIONS


    An in-depth examination of the American correctional system, covering probation, intermediate punishments, corrections, parole, community correction, as well as related issues such as clemency, boot camps, sentencing, the death penalty and challenges facing corrections. Attention will be given to the Pennsylvania correctional system, its agencies and national and state current events which dictate how public policy decision-making affects the American correctional process.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3276 - CRIMINOLOGY: A MULTI DISCIPLINARY APPROACH


    Acquaints students with the nature and forms of crime. Major areas of concern are the functions of law, the scientific study of crime, criminological topologies, classical and positive definitions of crime, comparative criminology, and the problem of punishment.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3301 - INDUSTRIAL SECURITY


    Examines basic industrial security concepts, principles, and methodologies. Provides knowledge of procedures and programs currently applied in industrial security management.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3324 - JUDICIAL CRIMINAL PROCESS


    An examination of the role and function of the judiciary in the criminal justice decision-making process. It includes a survey of America’s court system and an in-depth analysis of its major components. Emphasis will also be placed on important interactions within the judicial system and its major interrelationships with other criminal justice agencies.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3336 - CRIMINALISTICS


    Examines the phase of the criminal investigation process concerned with physical evidence. Major emphasis will be placed upon legal and technical consideration in the recognition, collection, and preservation of various categories of physical evidence and the process through which it is transmitted to the crime laboratory. Attention will also be given to knowledge requirements of the evidence technician in terms of the capabilities and techniques of the crime laboratory.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CJA 1100 AND CJA 2200.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3354 - CRIMINAL LAW


    This course is designed to give students an understanding of the origins and purposes of criminal law, the constitutional limitations on criminal law, and the general principles of criminal liability and defenses to criminal liability. The definitions and various elements of crimes of most frequent concern will also be examined.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3355 - EVIDENCE and CRIMINAL PROCEDURE


    This course is designed to give students an understanding of the major aspects of the law of criminal procedure, the purposes behind that law and how that law impacts the search for, the gathering of, and the use of evidence in criminal cases. The constitutional provisions which are the source of much of the law of criminal procedure, and the courts’ interpretations of those provisions, will be closely examined.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3357 - CORRECTIONAL STRATEGIES


    Offender classification; special offender groups, treatment, custody, recidivism, and strategies designed to change offender conduct.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3359 - JUVENILE JUSTICE


    All aspects of juvenile justice, with particular emphasis on delinquency and its causes, will be covered. The legal rights of juveniles and the evolution of these rights will be reviewed from a constitutional perspective. Inter-relationships with other institutions, including law enforcement, criminal courts, and placement alternatives will also be examined.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 3395 - DELINQUENCY AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM


    Exposes students to the full impact of the delinquency problem. Theories of delinquency causation, prevention, and rehabilitation will be critically examined.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4401 - ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL SECURITY


    An advanced course focusing on industrial and government security concepts, principles, and methodologies. Knowledge of relationships of industrial security procedures in business organizations to the Department of Defense National Security Program will be examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: CJA 3301.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4405 - RESEARCH METHODS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE


    An introduction to research methodology with particular emphasis placed on criminal justice issues. Examines research theory, its major components, and its application to various criminal justice agencies including the police, courts, correctional institutions, etc.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4450 - INTERNSHIP IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION


    An educational and work experience in an actual Criminal Justice related agency including police, courts, corrections, or private security.

    Credits: 6 - 12 cr.Notes: May be taken for six through twelve credits.
  
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    CJA 4453 - POLICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION


    Organizational theory, budgeting, personnel management planning, information management theory, civil service, unions, management prerogatives, supervision, executive development, manpower distribution schemes, and policy development and execution as applied in both small and large law enforcement agencies.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisites: CJA 11 00 and CJA 2200.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4475 - SERIAL MURDER


    A broad overview of serial, spree and mass murder in the U.S. during the 20th century. Examines the myths and social construction of serial murder, FBI involvement, crime scene analysis, the organized and disorganized offender, and crime scene, history of serial murder in the U.S., construction of profiling, and behavior typology, and also examines offender typology (gender, race and team serial killers).

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4490 - SENIOR SEMINAR


    This is a capstone course designed to: 1) help seniors integrate the knowledge gained from their other criminal justice courses; 2) assist them in developing analytical thinking skills through focusing on several selected topics; and 3) to instill confidence that they have acquired a core body of knowledge that will assist them when they enter a criminal justice agency or graduate school.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4496 - SELECTED TOPICS


    An intense analysis of a selected topic in law enforcement, adjudication, and correctional fields. Intended for advanced undergraduates, graduates, and in service professionals.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    CJA 4497 - INDEPENDENT STUDY


    Independent study is an activity initiated by the student to increase his/her already advanced knowledge in a particular academic discipline. The subject is examined in an intensive manner with guidance by a faculty member who has special expertise in that field..

    Credits: 1 - 3 cr.Notes: May be taken for one, two or three credits at one time
  
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    COM 1101 - ORAL COMMUNICATION


    Objectives are to help the student to formulate his/her own ideas coherently, evaluate factual material, and use sound reasoning patterns in his/her preparation and attempts to communicate concepts orally; to determine and select the most effective means of expression in formal and informal speaking situations. Required of all Mansfield students.

    Credits: 3 cr.
  
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    COM 2200 - ORAL INTERPRETATION


    An introductory course in presenting oral readings of various literary genres. It involves written analysis and practical experience in presenting selections, and the understanding and appreciation of oral interpretation as the communication of the readers impression of the authors intent as an artistic representation of his/her world in a piece of literature.

    Prerequisites & Notes: Prerequisite: COM 1101 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 cr.
 

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